Food

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Craft Food

Families of Carrots, Miniature Mountains, and Baguettes Crafted from Needle Felted Wool by Hanna Dovhan

January 16, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Ukraine-based designer Hanna Dovhan (previously) consistently delights us with her needle felted wool sculptures of anthropomorphic mushroom pairs, clutched baguettes, and miniature mountain families. The works are each decorated with a tiny smiling face, and sometimes paired with a micro mustache. You can see new sets of cuddly creatures by following her on Instagram or visiting her Etsy shop Woolsculpture.

 

 



Craft Food

Miniature Embroideries by ipnot Transform Thread into Delicious Designs

January 9, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Japanese embroidery artist ipnot (previously) continues to dazzle us with her creative miniatures formed from thread and embroidery hoops. The works often incorporate props, such as ketchup bottles or chopsticks, to add an interactive layer to the pieces. Textile noodles are staged in slurping position while a perfect pile of ketchup appears to have just been dolloped onto another one of her works. The artist’s realistic designs typically involve food, like her recent sushi stop-motion animation, or a hovering pizza slice that appears to be connected to an embroidery hoop with melted cheese. You can see more of the artist’s embroideries on Instagram.

 

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Sushi Roll🍣 – #embroidery #stopmotion #ipnot#節分#恵方巻#刺繍

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Art Food

Pixelated Glitches Interrupt Painted Portraits of Victorian Families, Still Lifes, and Birds

November 13, 2018

Anna Marks

The Milan-based painter Aldo Sergio uses paint to warp perception, creating portraits and still life paintings which blur the boundary between the digital and the physical, and the traditional and the contemporary. In one of his paintings, three men in clerical clothing look inquisitively at a pixelated bunch of bananas, and in another parts of a Victorian family, from their faces to conventional garments, are pixelated in rectangular lines. In a third piece a couple poses before a selection of indoor houseplants while a hen with a blurred leg stands next to their feet.

Sergio uses traditional painting methods to capture portraits of Victorian families, bowls of fruit, and birds, and then distorts these objects by covering them in small ‘glitches.’ Sergio builds tensions between objects, people and space, and his carefully painted glitch-like malfunctions to give his artworks an unusual movement, making a stark contrast to the stillness and seriousness of traditional paintings.

His solo exhibition at Galleria Patricia Armocida in Milan runs until the 30th of November, 2018. You can see more of his pixelated paintings on his website and Instagram.

 

 



Design Food

Cartoonish Bread Faces and Other Wheaty Characters by Sabine Timm

November 8, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Have your kids been complaining about what’s in their lunchbox lately? They must be following Sabine Timm on Instagram. The self-described “artist, creator, beach-trash collector, flea-market lover and photographer” shares a wide variety of work inspired by everyday and found objects. One series in particular is a clever cast of characters formed from sandwich bread.

Timm uses sliced white and whole wheat bread, along with rye crisps, pumpernickle, and baguettes to form the base of endearing, ephemeral faces. Some slices take the shape of humanoid characters, with chives for hair and raspberries for noses, while others, like her canine quartet, feature shiny black olive eyeballs and noses. You can see more from Timm’s eclectic output on Flickr. (via Swiss Miss)

 

 



Art Design Food

Delicate Flowers and Interlocking Tessellations Carved into Fruits and Vegetables by Takehiro Kishimoto

October 17, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Japanese chef and skilled food carver Takehiro Kishimoto (previously) explores the traditional art of produce design on his captivating Instagram account. Here he posts cucumbers, radishes, and avocados that have been transformed into detailed patterns and skillfully rendered motifs, in addition to kiwis and carrots that blossom into ornate flowers. His most impressive designs might be his interactive apple and watermelon works which he carves to expand like lanterns when pulled from the top.

The popular food artist is from Kobe, Japan, and has only been carving for the last three or so years. Many of his designs are based on traditional Japanese patterns, yet combine inspirations from both Thai fruit carving and the Japanese art of decorative garnishing, or Mukimono. Take a look at some of his more intricate work in the videos below.

 

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Design Food

A Cafe in Seoul Uses Clever Contour Lines to Appear Like a 2-Dimensional Cartoon

September 27, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Photo by @bulaiern

Since 2017, a small cafe in South Korea has been transporting its visitors to a two-dimensional world. Cafe Yeonnam-dong 239-20 in Seoul features all-white walls, floors, furniture, and fixtures accented with black contour lines that give the space the flattened look of a cartoon drawing. Illustration-inspired elements include drawn cacti, a curious puppy, and blank picture frames. Some of the beverage containers even sport defining lines. You can take a peek inside the playful cafe on Instagram and Facebook. (via My Modern Met)

Photo by @benjamin_liang

Photo by @cg__shinwonho

Photo by @__elsalovetravel__

Photo by @tsaichialing_kelly

Photo by @mmarichell

Photo by d7my_uk_

Photo by @adayinthelalz

 

 



Amazing Design Food

Watch How Steel Ribbons Are Shaped into Cookie Cutters

September 12, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

CookieCutter.com makes and sells exactly what you think they do. The Missouri-based company uses a combination of hydraulic and hand-operated machines to shape steel ribbons into classic shapes like gingerbread men, along with more complicated designs like deer and even the Statue of Liberty. The methodical push and pull of the shaping devices makes for great visual fodder, and CookieCutter.com frequently shares their process videos on Instagram and Facebook.

 

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