Food

Section



Amazing Design Food

Watch How Steel Ribbons Are Shaped into Cookie Cutters

September 12, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

CookieCutter.com makes and sells exactly what you think they do. The Missouri-based company uses a combination of hydraulic and hand-operated machines to shape steel ribbons into classic shapes like gingerbread men, along with more complicated designs like deer and even the Statue of Liberty. The methodical push and pull of the shaping devices makes for great visual fodder, and CookieCutter.com frequently shares their process videos on Instagram and Facebook.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Cookiecutter.com (@otbp_cookiecutters) on

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Cookiecutter.com (@otbp_cookiecutters) on

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Cookiecutter.com (@otbp_cookiecutters) on

 

 



Design Food

New Geometrically-Inspired Pastries, Cakes, and Sweets by Dinara Kasko

September 11, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Dinara Kasko (previously here and here) uses her background as an architect and 3D visualizer to produce geometric cakes that at first glance seem impossible to eat. The mathematically-inspired shapes are digitally constructed with a modeling program, which Kasko then 3D prints in silicone to create a mould. Recently, she has begun to sell these designs on her website to provide home pastry chefs the chance to try one of her stunning creations. You can take a behind-the-scenes look into the digital modeling that goes into one of Kasko’s Toros passion fruit cakes in the video below, and see more of her triangulated designs on her website and Instagram.

 

 

 

 

 



Design Food Photography

Flat Lay Photographs Created From Found Household Materials by Kristen Meyer

August 23, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Connecticut-based designer Kristen Meyer (previously) creates flat lay photographs on pastel backgrounds with precisely arranged vegetables, crackers, and other organic materials like rocks and leaves. The works are geometrically minded, like a recent design which created an isometric grid from sliced melon and kiwi or sliced cheese rounds that were transformed into a field of interlocking circles on top of equally sized crackers. All of her arrangements are shot in her house where she keeps a studio, however she often travels to whichever room of the house as best light. On the way she picks up various materials for her photographs, pulling inspiration from found objects.

“As far as how I find materials to experiment with, it varies a lot,” she tells Colossal. “I generally work with what I can find around the house, inside or out. It begins as a scavenger hunt of sorts, and then a challenge as I begin to build.”

In the fall Meyer will begin a set decorating project with photographer Adrien Broom. You can follow her style arrangements on Instagram, and buy select prints of her photographs on her website.

        

 

 



Food

Buttercream Succulents Decorate Edible Planters by Leslie Vigil

August 20, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Two years ago Leslie Vigil decided to merge her love of succulents and baking, using buttercream to decorate cupcakes and multi-teared cakes with bountiful collections of aloe, cacti, and echeveria. The Southern California-based cake artist quickly discovered that the traditional tools and piping nozzles available on the market were geared towards petals and other flower-based designs. Vigil modified her materials with pliers to more accurately represent the plants she wished to display on her sugary confections, like the rounded growths for her buttercream string-of-pearls.

“I’ve always found myself at home in a botanical garden or wrists deep in soil,” Vigil tells Colossal. “Being in nature has always brought me tremendous joy and inspiration. So, I was inspired to begin challenging myself to create flowers, succulents and cacti that truly honored and represented botanicals in nature as I knew them.”

You can see more of Vigil’s greenhouse-inspired cakes on Instagram. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 



Food

All-Natural Ingredients Create a Rainbow of Colors in Linda Miller Nicholson’s Playful Pastas

July 26, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Linda Miller Nicholson creates spectacular pastas from scratch, ranging from her signature rainbow fusilli to Mario Kart-inspired red and white ravioli. She works with all natural ingredients like butterfly pea flowers (blue), beets and blueberries (purple), turmeric (yellow), and parsley (green) to infuse her flour, egg, and water mixtures with eye-popping colors. Because her pastas are freshly made, quick cooking time allows the colors to maintain their vibrance after boiling.

Nicholson shares behind-the-scenes videos on YouTube, and you can see more of her finished and in-progress pastas on Instagram. Nicholson’s debut cookbook, is due out in October, and is available for preorder.

 

 



Art Food

Luminous Portraits of Sliced Fruit Glow Like Stained Glass Windows

July 6, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Rosettes Series #16, oil on canvas, 48 x 48 inches

Artist Dennis Wojtkiewicz paints enormous portraits of sliced fruit, often scaling four feet across or more. Each oil on canvas painting focuses exclusively on the edible subject, with dramatic backlit lighting seeming to light up the melons, citrus, apples, and kiwis. While Wojtkiewicz focuses on tiny details like individual segments of juice, striations, and the fuzzy skins, the realism is tempered by a slightly hazy, impressionistic finish. The artist is represented by Robert Kidd Gallery. You can see more of his paintings on his website. (via My Modern Met)

Melon Series #34, oil on canvas, 30 x 60 inches

Citrus Series #15, oil on canvas, 37 x 64 inches

Apple Series #2, oil on canvas, 48 x 50 inches

Rosettes Series #17, oil on canvas, 48 x 48 inches

Kiwi Series #4, oil on canvas, 48 x 44 inches

Rosettes Series #15, oil on canvas, 48 x 48 inches

Horn Melon Series #4, oil on canvas, 36 x 72 inches

Citrus Series #8, oil on canvas, 36 x 60 inches

Rosettes Series #13, oil on canvas, 48 x 48 inches

Citrus Series #12, oil on canvas, 27 x 72 inches

 

 



Design Food

Incredible Architectural Designs and Fantastical Flowers Made From Chocolate by Pastry Chef Amaury Guichon

July 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Amaury Guichon is an international pastry chef and consultant based in Las Vegas who has sculpted unbelievable chocolate creations during the last decade of his career. Recently the talented confection artist completed a Greek Atlas with an armillary sphere on his back, a detailed gramophone, and a nearly life-size cherry blossom tree, all made entirely from the malleable material. Guichon started his career at the age of 14, with apprenticeships throughout Switzerland and France, and at age 21 he was hired as the youngest executive pastry chef in Paris.

As of late last year, Guichon is the most followed pastry artist on Facebook and Instagram. Recently he has developed a master class to teach and consult pastry chefs from around the world. You can see a time-lapse video of his sculpted chocolate gramophone (with functioning drawer and gilded “metalwork”) in the Instagram video below.