Food

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Design Food

A New Circular Juice Machine Turns Orange Peels into Bioplastic Cups

September 9, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Freshly squeezed orange juice is a welcome sight at cafes worldwide. The machines often showcase about-to-be-squeezed oranges with pinball machine-esque wire loading racks and clear cases that allow the consumer to see their juice being made in real time. International design firm Carlo Ratti Associati (previously) takes the immediacy of the experience to another level. ‘Feel the Peel’ is a prototype machine that uses orange peels to create bioplastic, shaping bespoke cups to hold the juice made from the cups’ own innards.

In a press release about the project, Carlo Ratti Associati (CRA) explains that the approximately 9-foot tall machine handles 1,500 oranges, and the peels accumulate in the lower level. The peels are dried, milled, and mixed with polylactic acid to form a bioplastic, which is then heated and melted so that an internal 3-D printer can form each recyclable cup. CRA shares that they will continue to iterate, and are considering creating clothing from orange peels as a future functionality.

Follow along with CRA’s wide-ranging projects on Instagram and Twitter. If you enjoy Feel the Peel, also check out the cone-shaped french fry holders made from potato peels, designed by Simone Caronni, Paolo Stefano Gentile and Pietro Gaeli, as well as Mi Zhou’s toiletry containers made of soap. (via designboom)

 

 



Art Design Food

Cheese Slices, Condiments, and Other Object Collections Bound into Books by Ben Denzer

August 23, 2019

Andrew LaSane

“20 SLICES of American Cheese” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

Toying with the concept of what a book can be, American designer Ben Denzer (through his publishing house Catalog Press) binds unusual collections of objects to create humorous volumes that you’re unlikely to find in a library. The limited edition books have been sold in the Whitney Shop, landing in the hands of a few lucky collectors. The unique objects have also found their way into the collections of museums and universities around the world.

A graphic designer with a degree in Architecture and Certificate in the Visual Arts, Denzer has created books of bound cheese slices, ketchup and sweetener packets, napkins, sequentially numbered dollar bills, and other books. The covers and spines feature the Catalog Press logo as well as well bold text announcing what the “reader” will find inside. In an interview with Its Nice That, Denzer shared his stance on books as “both content and object; simultaneously sculpture and catalog, singular contained multitudes.” He added that through Catalog Press he can “use the idea of the book as a catalogue to explore these wackier ideas while at the same time experimenting with more constrained design moves.”

Ben Denzer’s exploration of books can also be seen in his Ice Cream Books project which pairs real books with their ice cream complement. To see more of his work, check out his online portfolio and follow Denzer on Instagram.

“20 SLICES of American Cheese”Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

“5 KETCHUPS” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

“5 KETCHUPS” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

“INFLATABLE BOOK JACKET” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

“$200 IN ORDER” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

“FOUR FLIP BOOKS” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

“15 MASS MARKET PAPERBACKS” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

“30 NAPKINS from The Plaza Hotel” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

“200 FORTUNES” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

 

 



Art Design Food

Le Corbuffet: Conceptual Cookbook Presents Art-Inspired Recipes as Contemporary Sculptures

August 22, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

From the mind of Esther Choi comes a new cookbook titled Le Corbuffet: Edible Art and Design Classics. The writer, photographer, and artist has compiled a list of recipes inspired by artists, designers, and their creations, all staged in contemporary arrangements. Recipes seek to distill the practices of figures such as Frida Kahlo and Barbara Kruger into their best and most delicious aspects—like the crisp and bright Frida Kale-o Salad, or the crimson-colored and acerbic Rhubarbara Kruger Compote.

The idea was first launched during a series of participatory dinner parties Choi hosted in 2015 after discovering a 1937 menu designed by artist László Moholy-Nagy for Bauhaus founder and architect Walter Gropius. After creating her own set of detailed dishes, she decided to compile them into a book that would be a playful spin on the artists she admired.

“I hosted the first in a series of ‘Le Corbuffets’ in my Brooklyn apartment, a project which carried on until 2017,” she explains on her website. “Offering meals to an assortment of guests, these social gatherings revolved around the consumption of absurd, pun-inspired dishes that referred to canonical artists and designers. As a commentary on the status of art, food, and design as commodities to be ‘gobbled up’ by the market, the project deliberately twisted idioms to explore the notion of ‘aesthetic consumption’ though taste and perception.”

Le Corbuffet will be published October 1, 2019. You can see her photographs, in additions to snippets of recipes from what she describes as “a conceptual artwork in the form of a cookbook” in the following images, and learn more about her art and writing by following her on Instagram.

 

 



Craft Design Food

Sculptures of Everyday Meals and Household Goods Crafted From Brightly Colored Paper by Lee Ji-Hee

August 20, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Korean paper artist Lee Ji-hee builds scale models of food, household furnishings, and brightly colored vehicles for her commercial clients. The works are meticulously designed down to the smallest detail, such as the striped lining of a pink and yellow car seat, or speckles of detritus being swept up by a set of vacuums. In 2017 the artist created a series of vintage cameras, dramatically lighting each as if on the set of a noir film. You can see more of her perfectly folded and glued miniature works on her website, Instagram, and Behance.

 

 

 



Craft Food

Crocheted Hams and Hairdryers by Trevor Smith Evoke Memories of Mid-Century Domesticity

August 9, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

By day, Trevor Smith is a local council worker in Victoria, Australia. After hours, Smith creates replicas of elaborate meals and household appliances in crocheted wool. Cheese platters, baked hams, toasters, and hair dryers are carefully constructed using foam armatures underneath the woolen exteriors. Smith has had a lifelong interest in crafts, and shared with The Design Files, “my mother was a talented craftswoman and I was always shadowing her, wanting to be doing what she was doing.” Smith earned a degree in Visual Arts as a sculpture major and also has been a curator of public art collections for the last 30 years. His crocheted artwork is available through Michael Reid gallery, and Smith shares updates on Facebook. If you enjoy the artist’s work, also check out Lucy Sparrow and Kate Jenkins for more fiber interpretations of food. (via The Design Files)

 

 

 

 

 

 



Design Food Photography

Apples and Oranges Come Together in Photographs of Spliced Fruits by Yuni Yoshida

June 20, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

The saying goes that you can’t compare apples and oranges, but Japanese art director Yuni Yoshida finds unusual ways to bring the two opposing fruits together. Yoshida has played with food in the past, creating pixelated pineapples, bananas, and even hamburgers. Forgoing digital manipulation, Yoshida used the actual ingredients to form each colorful cube. In her more recent series, Yoshida fuses various combinations of kiwis, oranges, apples, and bananas, playing with the recognizable colors and textures of each fruit’s skin as she splices them together.

In an interview with Amazon Fashion Week, Yoshida described her approach to design: “I love taking something real and letting my imagination run wild with it. When I produce something, I am not trying to do something particularly intricate, so that others take notice. I want people to think, ‘Wait, something is different’ and become inspired.”

Explore Yoshida’s recent work on Instagram and take a deeper look into her portfolio on her website.

 

 



Design Food

An Everyday Ritual Becomes a Zoological Tour with a Japanese Company’s Animal Tea Bags

June 17, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Japanese tea company Ocean Tea Bag elevates an everyday ritual into an animal adventure. Intricate tea bag designs range from giant squids and otters to red pandas and cephalopods. Layers, folds, and perforations help to create the details of each creature’s body, which also doubles as a pouch for the tea blend inside. The company was created by Takahashi Shota and launched its first product, a dolphin design, with a crowdfunding campaign in 2015. Since then, Shota has added a vast menagerie of animals to the product line. Luckily, the company started accepting overseas orders just a few weeks ago. Sets of individual animals/flavors and variety packs are available on the Ocean Tea Bag website.