Food

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Food

Twisting Vines and Leafy Botanics Carved into Crusty Breads by Blondie + Rye

March 12, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Blondie + Rye

North Carolina-based baker Hannah P. has planted herself firmly at the intersection of art and food as she transforms her crusty rye loaves and spelt focaccias into edible canvases for her botanic projects. Through her Instagram account Blondie + Rye, Hannah shares hundreds of flour-covered creations replete with twisting vines and leafy stems. Some pieces even feature layered fruits and vegetables that resemble verdant gardens and floral bouquets. If the baker’s combinations weren’t so appetizing—think a spelt loaf speckled with rosemary and brown sugar and a cream cheese, Romano, and lemon zest center or a ring full of extra-crunchy peanut butter, honey, toasted pecans, pistachios, walnuts, and hazelnut cocoa filling—they’d be almost too pretty to eat. For more lovely baked exteriors, check out Lauren Ko‘s pies.

 

 



Art Food Photography

Pearls Puncture and Support Fruit and Vegetables in Photographs by Ana Straže

December 26, 2019

Grace Ebert

All images © Ana Straže, shared with permission

In her latest series Forbidden Foods, photographer Ana Straže pierces a peeling slice of grapefruit, a cut eggplant, and other fruits and vegetables using small pins topped with pearls to create contemporary still lifes of common foods. The Slovenia-based artist manipulates food and positions the pins in patterns as an attempt to alter the meaning of the every day objects. Straže tells Colossal she hoped the pearls would “help expose and emphasize different shapes and food value, such as emphasizing the structure of the epidermis, helping compositionally insert an object into a given space, complementing the food, and adding a new perspective.”

The ongoing series is an extension of the photographer’s previous work Garden of Eden, a project that centered on women’s expulsion in the Old Testament. “Through contemporary ways, I want to capture food in a unique approach with a slight sensual touch,” Straže writes. “With the Forbidden Food series, I’m trying to discover the limits of aesthetics and notice the importance of simple everyday things.” You can see more of the photographer’s food-based work on Instagram.

 

 



Animation Food

Felted Bacon Sizzles and Wooly Bread is Sliced in Breakfast-Themed Fiber Animations by Andrea Love

December 4, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

 

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We’ve all heard that we should incorporate more fiber into our diets. But did our doctors mean… wool? Andrea Love is on the front lines of nutritionally dense animation with her fiber-based short films centered around breakfast foods. Minuscule pots of coffee pour into green mugs, spirals of yarn turn from black to red as stove-top heating elements, and succulent lemons squirt out felted juice when squeezed. The Washington-based artist works from her basement studio crafting both client-commissioned and personal work. Watch more of Love’s felt-fueled animations on Instagram, where she generously shares behind-the-scenes knowledge in responses to questions from her 100,000+ followers. (via Laughing Squid)

 

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Documentary Food

Déguste: A New Short Film Showing the Beauty and Brutality of Commercial Kitchen Work

November 1, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Alternating between sensual, almost biological macro shots of raw ingredients and the harsh, dully-lit environs of a commercial kitchen, Déguste captures the dual reality of working as a professional chef. The majesty, beauty, and limitless potential of natural ingredients—mushrooms, red meat, fresh greens—are right at hand for the commercial cook. But the unrelenting pace of orders in, orders up, dishing out multiple copies of the same meal at once, and juggling the dangers of sharp and hot tools cuts in again and again. Déguste gives viewers a glimpse at how the sausage gets made, so to speak, in the restaurant world, with an electrifying soundtrack of atmospheric sounds. Created by Paris-based studio Insolence Productions, the short has been lauded at multiple film festivals. See more from Insolence on Vimeo

 

 



Art Food

Moldy Fruit Sculptures Formed From Precious Gemstones Challenge Perceptions of Decoration and Decay

October 16, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Bad Lemon (Creep)” (2019). All images courtesy the artist and Josh Lilley, London. Photographs by Lance Brewer.

Artist Kathleen Ryan creates a conversation between the beautiful and the grotesque in her oversized sculptures of mold-covered fruit. The New York-based artist uses precious and semi-precious stones like malachite, opal, and smoky quartz to form the simulacrum of common green rot on each fruit. Working at a larger-than-life scale, Ryan creates a foam base, rudimentarily painted to map out the fresh and rotten areas on the surface. She then individually places each gemstone, with varied shapes, sizes, and colors that emulate the shift from desirable to disgusting. Lemons are a particular favorite, but Ryan also works with oranges and pears, with each work scaling 6 to 29 inches. “The sculptures are beautiful and pleasurable, but there’s an ugliness and unease that comes with them,” Ryan told The New York Times.

Ryan is represented by London-based gallery Josh Lilley, where she had a solo show in 2018, as well as François Ghebaly in Los Angeles, where her fruit was the namesake for the recent group show Bad Peach. This year, Ryan exhibited her work in solo shows at The New Art Gallery in Walsall, U.K. and at MIT’s List Visual Arts Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts, as well as part of Desert X in Coachella, CA. Two of Ryan’s lemons are also on view through October 20, 2019 with François Ghebaly at FIAC international art fair. The artist studied Studio Art and Anthropology at Pitzer College and received a Master’s of Fine Arts from U.C.L.A. See more from Ryan’s wide-ranging artistic practice on Instagram, and explore more of her work on the gallery websites of Josh Lilley and François Ghebaly.

“Soft Spot” (2019), amber, amethyst, rhodonite, rose quartz, serpentine, tree agate, jungle jasper, smokey quartz, garnet, agate, turquoise, olive jade, bone, pink lepidonite, glass, steel pins on coated polystyrene, 6 x 8 x 6 in

“Emerald City” (2019), amazonite, onyx, quartz, rose quartz, turquoise, emerald, jasper, serpentine, smokey quartz, olive jade, fluorite, amethyst, tree agate, Ching Hai jade, lapis lazuli, agate, Russian serpentine, marble, ruby in zoisite, abalone shell, bone, coral, freshwater pearl, glass, steel pins on coated polystyrene, 18 x 29 x 20 in

“Emerald City” (2019), alt. view

“Emerald City” (2019), detail

 

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“Serpentine Flurry” (2019), serpentine, onyx, quartz, rose quartz, rhodonite, jasper, unakite, smokey quartz, amazonite, sesame jasper, olive jade, fluorite, lodolite, amethyst, tree agate, Ching Hai jade, lapis lazuli, agate, Russian serpentine, marble, ruby in zoisite, abalone shell, bone, coral, freshwater pearl, petrified wood, glass, steel pins on coated polystyrene, 23 x 25 x 25 in

“Bad Lemon (Sour Sparkle)” (2019), serpentine, aventurine, labradorite, rhodonite, rhodochrosite, pink aventurine, rose quartz, black onyx, citrine, unakite, tektite, smoky quartz, quartz, carnelian, limestone, pink lepidolite, tree agate, red agate, grey agate, black agate, breccicated jasper, hematite, mother of pearl, bone, freshwater pearl, 19 3/4 x 20 x 29 in

“Bad Lemon (Sour Sparkle)” (2019), detail

“Bad Peach” (2019), rose quartz, agate, carnelian, pink opal, rhodonite, rhodochrosite, calcite, amber, quartz, fluorite, tree agate, magnesite, turquoise, serpentine, bone, coral, jasper, tiger eye, labradorite, red malachite, mother of pearl, glass, steel pins on coated polystyrene, 15.5 x 16.5 x 16 inches

“Bad Lemon (Creep)” (2019), amazonite, aventurine, black onyx, Italian onyx, turquoise, labradorite, carnelian, ocean jasper, sesame jasper, serpentine, fluorite, Ching Hai jade, snow quartz, magnesite, agate, breccicated jasper, rhodonite, rhodochrosite, red agate, garnet, tree agate, rose quartz, amethyst, lilac stone, limestone, marble, mother of pearl, bone, freshwater pearl, glass, steel pins on coated polystyrene, 20 x 20 x 28 1/2 in

“Bad Lemon (Creep)” (2019), detail

 

 



Art Craft Food

Decadent Baked Goods Replicated in Crocheted Wool by Kate Jenkins

October 11, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

We don’t recommend getting near Kate Jenkins’s breakfast spread before you’ve had your morning coffee, or you might find yourself biting down on a bagel full of yarn. The British crochet artist (previously) creates fiber-based foods that bear a striking resemblance to their edible inspirations. Jenkins has a particular affinity for baked goods: her recent spreads include bagels and lox, whole grain bread loaves, and individual fruit tarts. The artist creates every last detail down to tiny caper berries, thinly sliced red onions, and kiwi and poppy seeds made from black beads.

Jenkins learned to knit and crochet as a child in Wales, and shares in an artist statement that she has always been fascinated and inspired by everyday objects and experiences. In addition to her culinary crochets, Jenkins trained and worked for many years as a knitwear designer in the fashion world. Keep up with Jenkins’s freshest bakes on Instagram, and purchase artwork in her online store.

For those in NYC who love textile-based delectables, we also recommend Lucy Sparrow’s felt food “deli” pop-up at Rockefeller Center, open through October 20, 2019.

 

 



Design Food

Edible Apparel by Sung Yeonju Turns Vegetables into Cocktail Dresses

October 10, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

“Tasteful dress” gets a whole new meaning in Sung Yeonju’s edible apparel. The Korean artist’s ongoing series, Wearable Foods, combines relatable materials with digital editing to form cocktail dresses, shorts, and blazers. Gracefully draped scallions, polka-dotted lotus roots, and subtly striped banana peels become unique ‘fabrics’ suited for a night on the town. Watch Sung turn produce into fashion in the behind-the-scenes video below. (via Trendland)