3d printing

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Amazing Design Science

MIT Engineers Design Responsive 3D-Printed Structures Remotely Controlled by Magnets

June 22, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

A new concept for 3D printed structures designed by engineers at MIT can be remotely controlled with magnets. The innovative gadgets include a smooth ring that wrinkles up, a long tube that squeezes shut, and a sheet that folds itself. The most impressive structure is a spider-like “grabber” that can crawl, roll, jump, and snap together fast enough to catch a passing ball or wrap up and carry small objects. Each piece is created using 3D printable ink infused with tiny magnetic particles that are directed into a uniform orientation via printer nozzle retrofitted with a electromagnet.

Researches believe these magnetic concepts could one day find applications in the realm of medicine similar to implanted stents or pacemakers. “We think in biomedicine this technique will find promising applications,” explains Xuanhe Zhao, the Noyce Career Development Professor in MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. “For example, we could put a structure around a blood vessel to control the pumping of blood, or use a magnet to guide a device through the GI tract to take images, extract tissue samples, clear a blockage, or deliver certain drugs to a specific location. You can design, simulate, and then just print to achieve various functions.” (via digg)

 

 



Design

LEGOs Snap Into Place in Hintlab’s Line of Playful Rings and Earrings

November 20, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Paris-based design duo Hintlab amplifies the nostalgia tied to Lego bricks by bringing the classic children’s toy to an older audience. Their line of earrings and rings are made to house small, interchangeable bricks, allowing their customers to customize their look depending on their mood or whim. Each piece of 3D-printed jewelry comes with a set of ten objects that can be either worn as a singular setting or stacked to create a multi-layer work.

Hintlab has also developed a line of jewelry that fits flush in its setting. The color and shape of the flat bricks still reflect the feeling of Lego, but are housed in a more minimal package. You can buy your own interchangeable set on the group’s Etsy, and see past designs on their Instagram. (via Designboom)

 

 



Art Craft

A Tree-Like Figure Composed of Natural and Technological Elements by Garret Kane

October 27, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

The newest sculpture by assemblage artist Garret Kane (previously) combines moss, tree branches, and other natural elements with technological components to create a towering 7-foot-tall sculpture. The tree-like figure is Kane’s amalgamation of two protectors from vastly different cultural backgrounds. The first is the ancient Judaic Golem made from mud and sticks, and the second inspiration is the Japanese Mecha, a large protector composed of advanced robotics.

Kane combined elements from both traditions to create the Golemecha, a creature with powers tied to nature and advanced technologies. Using materials from tree roots to 3D printed parts, he built the complex model as a figure who would protect our natural world from the new technologies that threaten its existence. You can see more of Kane’s fantastical assemblages on his website and Behance.

 

 



Art

Beetle Sculptures Encrusted with Minerals by Nozomi

October 15, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Paris-based artist Nozomi created these glistening beetle specimens through a process of digital sculpting, 3d printing, and good old-fashioned lacquer painting. The works are a continuation of an ongoing series where she explores the backs of beetles as a backdrop for her ditigal work. Nozomi is selling a few of the pieces on Etsy and you can follow her on Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Design Science

3D-Printed Solar Systems, Moons and Planets for Your Desktop

March 1, 2017

Christopher Jobson

The folks over at London-based Little Planet Factory make tiny 3d-printed planets and moons you can sit on your desktop or hold in your hands. Designs include everything from entire solar systems to collections of moons, individual planets, and even science fiction creations like a theoretical terraformed Mars globe. See more in their shop! (via So Super Awesome)

 

 



Animation Design

A Stop Motion Examination of Endless Loading Screens

February 17, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Director Rafael Vangelis transforms the unbearable task of watching an endlessly spinning wheel or loading bar into an entertaining and analogue study of self-produced loading mechanisms in his latest short film Analogue Loaders. Using stop motion techniques and traditional animation he turns clay, wood, 3D-printed objects, and even eggs into 3D loaders, dazzling the eye rather than enraging the mind.

Vangelis considers the short film an animated autobiography, as he spends a great chunk of his own life watching projects slowly load and computers crash. “The result,” says Vangelis, “is an homage to all the lost time we collectively spend in digital limbo in the hopes of sudden development on our screen.”

The video was just selected as a Staff Pick on Vimeo. You can see behind-the-scenes video of Analogue Loaders on Vangelis’s website.

 

 



Amazing Animation Art Design Science

Blooms 2: Extraordinary New Strobe-Animated Sculptures by John Edmark

January 10, 2017

Christopher Jobson

As artist John Edmark‘s sculptures wiggle, wobble, and twist before your eyes like some alien creature, it’s hard to believe that what you’re seeing is a real physical object—but we assure you it is, with a bit of trick photography and some heady mathematics thrown in for good measure. Blooms 2 (a year in the making) is the latest collection of wild strobe-animated sculptures that begin life as computer programs written in Python before being 3D printed and set in motion on a table, but the patterns you see are created, in a sense, by nature itself.

“Blooms are based on the same geometry nature uses in many plant forms, including artichokes, sunflowers, and pinecones, all of which share the same underlying mathematical pattern,” Edmark shares with Colossal. He explains in more detail how each sculpture is designed:

Blooms are 3-D printed sculptures designed to animate when spun under a strobe light. Unlike a 3D zoetrope, which animates a sequence of small changes to objects, a bloom animates as a single self-contained sculpture. The bloom’s animation effect is achieved by progressive rotations of the golden ratio, phi (ϕ), the same ratio that nature employs to generate the spiral patterns we see in pinecones and sunflowers. The rotational speed and strobe rate of the bloom are synchronized so that one flash occurs every time the bloom turns 137.5º (the angular version of phi).

While the strobe is necessary to witness the animation when viewing these pieces in person, for the sake of creating this video filmmaker Charlie Nordstrom set the camera to a short shutter speed that freezes individual “frames” of the spinning sculpture.

Many of Edmark’s pieces are now in galleries and permanent museum collections around the world. You can see several of his sculptures right now at the Exploratorium in San Francisco and the Technorama in Winterthur, Switzerland. You can also see some of his first designs in his original Blooms video, and for what it’s worth, we also carry his amazing Helicone sculpture in the Colossal Shop.

 

 

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