3d printing

Posts tagged
with 3d printing



Art Design

Flux: A Mesmerizing 3D-Printed Zoetrope that Glows

December 14, 2015

Christopher Jobson

Created by German designer Dieter Pilger along with Janno Ströcker and Frederik Scheve, this dizzying 3D-printed zoetrope was designed around the mathematics of the Fibonacci sequence. Unlike similar devices we’ve seen, Pilger says their design isn’t photographed or viewed using a strobe light to create the animation effect, but instead appears to move when staring directly at it in regular light (or darkness). The team credits John Edmark as their inspiration due to his earlier work with Fibonacci zoetropes.

zoe-1

zoe-2

zoe-3

zoe-4

 

 



Art Design

Unseen Art: 3D Printing Classical Paintings for the Blind

November 25, 2015

Johnny Waldman

Unseen Art

“You can look but you can’t touch.” That’s one of the first rules of museums, which house priceless works of art. But what about the community of blind and visually impaired who use their sense of touch to experience the world? The Unseen Art Project is an initiative to make art more accessible and inclusive by using 3D-printing technology to create replicas of masterpieces that can be touched ’till your heart is content.

“There are many people in the world who have heard of classical artworks their whole lives but are unable to see them,” says Marc Dillon, a Helsinki-based designer who wants to make works like the Mona Lisa touchable. In order to make his vision a reality, Dillon has recently established a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo. He hopes to raise enough money to create an online repository where artists can contribute 3D data of artworks and anyone with a 3D printer will be able to print it out.

With the price of 3D printers drastically coming down in recent years, Dillon’s project has the potential to “touch” a large population of people who have an interest in art but have never been able see it. As the campaign points out, “It would be a revolution to get blind people going to art galleries, people hate them because there is nothing there to touch!” (via The Creators Project)

Unseen Art

Unseen Art

Unseen Art

Unseen Art

unseen art (9)

 

 



Design Science

Watch Molten Glass 3D-Printed From a Kiln at 1900 Degrees

August 26, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

glass-1

In collaboration with the MIT Glass Lab, the Mediated Matter group at the MIT Media Lab has produced a way to 3D print glass, creating intricate patterns from molten glass inside a kiln-like printer and giving a completely modern twist to the 4,500 year-old material. The video produced to exhibit the ways in which the technology works displays the process without words, instead focusing on the mesmerizing way the hot glass stacks upon itself in the machine and ultimately cools into the final vase-like forms.

Glass 3D printing (or G3DP) is based on a dual-heated chamber concept, with the top chamber heating the glass and lower chamber slowly cooling it to prevent internal stresses. The top chamber operates at approximately 1900°F, and funnels the molten material through an alumina-zircon-silica nozzle into its programmable shapes.

The researchers explain the concept of the project as one that “synthesizes modern technologies, with age-old established glass tools and technologies producing novel glass structures with numerous potential applications.” One application of which is beautifully designed vessels created without human error, forms that are mathematically perfect in appearance and design.

glass-1

Caustic patterns of a 3D printed glass structure. Photo: Chikara Inamura.

glass-2

Caustic patterns of a 3D printed glass structure. Photo: Chikara Inamura.

glass-3

Glass 3D printing process. Photo: Steven Keating

glass-4

Glass 3D printing process. Photo: Steven Keating

glass-2

glass-5

3D printed glass structure. Photo: Chikara Inamura.

glass-6

3D printed glass structure. Photo: Chikara Inamura.

glass-7

3D printed glass structure. Photo: Chikara Inamura.

 

 



Design Science

Green 3D Printer Prints Living Designs From Organic “Ink”

July 28, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

printgreen_11

Project PrintGREEN is turning 3D printers into on-demand gardeners after designing a “green” 3D printer in 2013. The printer produces living prints, printing customized objects in a variety of sizes and forms. The project was created at the University of Maribor in Slovenia, conceived of by students Maja Petek, Tina Zidanšek, Urška Skaza, Danica Rženičnik and Simon Tržan, with help from their mentor Dušan Zidar. The project’s goal is to unite art, technology, and nature, creatively producing living designs with the help of technology.

The “ink” in the machine is a combination of soil, seeds, and water which can be designed to print in any shape or letter. After drying, the muddy mixture holds its form and begins to sprout grass from the organic material. PrintGREEN’s slogan is a twist on the old conservationist motto, “think before you print,” telling their audience to “print, because it is green.” You can follow the project’s progress on their Facebook page here. (via My Modern Met)

printgreen_14

printgreen_07

printgreen_05

printgreen_15

printgreen_12

printgreen_13

printgreen_09

all images by PrintGREEN

 

 



Art

Guillaume Lachapelle’s Mirrored Dioramas Create the Illusion of Infinite Space

July 20, 2015

Christopher Jobson

lachapelle-1

lachapelle-2

lachapelle-3

lachapelle-4

lachapelle-5

lachapelle-6

Canadian artist Guillaume Lachapelle explores the infinite in this series of mysterious 3D printed dioramas titled Visions. Sitting atop pedestals in a darkened gallery, the eerie “rooms” rely on lights and mirrors to create the illusion of vast spaces that seem to reflect into much larger open spaces. These pieces were on view last year as part of a solo show at Art Mur in Québec, and you can see more of them up close over on Artsy.

 

 



Art Design Music Science

Turn Songs into 3D-Printed Sculptures You Can ‘Listen To’ with Reify

April 14, 2015

Christopher Jobson

reify-1

Since the earliest days of Winamp and other media players with vizualization software that transformed our favorite songs into pulsing animations, we’ve all grown accustomed to “seeing” music on a computer screen. A new company called Reify aims to put those same sound wave interpretations in your hands, as 3d-printed sculptures. Lead by founder and CEO Allison Wood, the team is creating software that turns any snippet of audio—from rock music to spoken poetry—into curious objects 3d-printed from bronze, plastic, or even coconut husk.

Reify is also creating software that allows you to ‘scan’ the sculptures with your phone to interpret them back into audio. It’s not clear from their concept video if the music is recognizable, but that’s probably not the point. These sound sculptures seem to be more about visual presentation than media like vinyl or a phonograph.

The Reify project has the unique distinction of being the fastest growing company born from NEW INC, the first museum-led (non-profit) incubator conceived by the New Museum in 2013. You can see many more music sculptures on their Tumblr. (via the Creator’s Project)

reify-2

“Ride of the Valkyries” by Richard Wagner

reify-3

reify-4

reify-5

reify-6

“Spin, Spin” by Gordon Lightfoot

reify-7

“How Music Works” by David Byrne

 

 



Craft Dance

Transport a Miniature Garden by Bike or Necklace with Colleen Jordan’s 3D Printed Planters

April 9, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

Wearable_08

Colleen Jordan’s Easter egg-hued vases are the perfect springtime accessory. Built in miniature, her creations are sized to carry small succulents or pocket-sized flower arrangements on one’s neckline, lapel, finger, or bicycle handle. The Atlanta-based designer and artist recently made Wearable Planter her full time gig, and each piece is influenced by the many places she has lived—including Sweden, Hawaii, and South Carolina. Jordan explains that through her business she strives to “create things to make life more pleasant.”

Each planter is 3D printed out of nylon and dyed individually. The planters are also sealed with acrylic varnish to keep out rain and maintain their bright color. Most of the vessels are designed with a flat bottom so they can also decorate your table or desk while not being worn. Jordan’s tiny planters can be purchased via her Etsy, and other crafts and miscellanea can be viewed on the Wearable Planter Instagram. (via iGNANT)

Wearable_05

Wearable_06

Wearable_07

Wearable_02

Wearable_10Wearable_012

Wearable_09

Wearable_03

Wearable_04