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Art

Fantastical Hybrid Characters by Toco-Oco Imagine the Mysteries of Human Nature

August 17, 2022

Grace Ebert

All images © Toco-Oco

Playfully curious, a troupe of hybrid characters dreamed up by the Brazil-based Toco-Oco (previously) has an inclination for the mythical. Figures sporting feathered suits and wolves cradling human heads are imbued with mystery, and together, the otherworldly cast becomes a metaphor for the varied, emotional, and sometimes bewildering nature of human existence. Toco-Oco, which is helmed by Lara Alcântara and Guilherme Neumann, sells prints and the small sculptures, which are made of wax, wood, and clay, in its shop, although the works sell out incredibly quickly, so be sure to keep an eye on Instagram for information about new releases.

 

 

 



Art Photography

Humor Infuses Exaggerated Features in Lola Dupre’s Meticulously Distorted Collages

August 17, 2022

Kate Mothes

“Randy 3,” 8.2 x 11.6 inches. All images © Lola Dupre, shared with permission

Glasgow-based artist Lola Dupre’s evocative and often humorous photographic collages of animals, historic images, and portraits tap into the unique personalities and emotions of her subjects. A cross-eyed cat has its vision multiplied, and a Shiba Inu’s joyful face pokes out of an enormous body in a play on repetition and perception. Dupre captures a range of expressions in both human and animal form (previously), exaggerating a raised eyebrow or fuzzy paw by layering numerous pieces of paper to extend legs, arm, eyes, and other features.

Dupre’s work will be included in Division of Birds at Paradigm Gallery + Studio in Philadelphia, and you can find more pieces on her website, Behance, and Instagram.

 

“Andromeda,” 11.6 x 8.2 inches

“Hercules,” 11.6 x 8.2 inches

Left: “Toni,” 8.2 x 11.6 inches, from original photography by Dacefer. Right: “David,” 8.2 x 11.6 inches, from original photography by David Sierra

“Fluffy,” 8.2 x 11.6 inches

“Ivor, After Walter Chandoha,” 11.6 x 8.2 inches

“Mari,” 8.2 x 11.6 inches, from original photography by Laerke Rose

Left: “Melange,” 8.2 x 11.6 inches. Right: “Mia,” 8.2 x 11.6 inches, from original photography by Arsalan Danish

 

 



Art

Discarded Tools, Scrap Metals, and Fabrics Form the Spirited Sculptures by Mohsen Heydari Yeganeh

August 15, 2022

Grace Ebert

All images © Mohsen Heydari Yeganeh, shared with permission

Artist Mohsen Heydari Yeganeh extends the life of broken tools, wooden handles, and scraps of fabric found in resale shops, stalls, and alleys. Utilizing chains for plumage or a long, steel blade for a beak, Yeganeh forms stylized animalistic assemblages of discarded materials, which he refers to as “flying garbages.” Conveying the awkward, jutting postures of birds or the broad stance of a bison, the spirited sculptures combine abstract components into lively, expressive characters.

Yeganeh is one part of Kasmeh, a Tehran-based studio where he works in collaboration with the artist Arman. You can follow their upcycled creatures on Instagram.

 

 

 



Art

In a Patterned Menagerie, Artist Anne Lemanski Stitches Printed Papers into Animal Forms

August 11, 2022

Grace Ebert

“Painted Wolf” (2019), copper rod, archival pigment print on paper, artificial sinew, 39 x 47 x 15 inches. All images by Steve Mann, © Anne Lemanski, shared with permission

Constellations, butterflies, and bold checkered prints overlay the animalistic forms by Anne Lemanski. Beginning with a copper armature, the North Carolina-based artist stretches vintage paper or patterns of scanned objects across a minimal metal form and stitches the edges together into a geometric patchwork.

Ranging from abstract shapes to illustrations and photos, the printed motifs evoke each character’s temperament, presence, and overall essence. “Stella Terra,” for example, is sheathed in white paper, and images of animals and objects speckle the ephemeral material similar to the spotted coat of the live Appaloosa counterpart. “My interest as of late has been pattern and color and the way it juxtaposes with the form when I take a three-dimensional object (like matches, toothpicks, or straws), make a new two-dimensional pattern with that object, then compose the two-dimensional pattern onto the three-dimensional form,” Lemanski says.

Some of the artist’s animals are on view in a group exhibition at Penland Gallery through September 17, and others are included in a forthcoming book devoted to North Carolina’s art culture. Find more of the ephemeral creatures on Instagram. (via Women’s Art)

 

“Fennec Fox (Dog Star)” (2009), copper, ink on paper, artificial sinew, 17 1/2 x 14 x 12 inches

“Gaudy Sphinx” (2014), copper rod and paper, 7 x 16 x 13 inches

“Camoufleur” (2014), copper rod, vintage paper targets, epoxy, 17 1/2 x 15 x 8 1/2 inches

“Tigris” (2018), copper rod, archival print on paper, artificial sinew, epoxy, plastic, 64 x 61 x 30 inches

Detail of “Tigris” (2018), copper rod, archival print on paper, artificial sinew, epoxy, plastic, 64 x 61 x 30 inches

“Mink” (2021), copper rod, archival inkjet on paper, artificial sinew

“Stella Terra” (2022), copper rod, Mohawk cover board, inkjet print on paper, artificial sinew, 80 x 80 x 20 inches

“Jackrabbit” (2015), pigment print on paper, copper rod, 27 1/2 x 26 x 9 inches

 

 



Photography

Phenomenal Skies and Animals in Action Top This Year’s Nature TTL Photography Contest

August 11, 2022

Grace Ebert

“The Astonishing,” Godafoss, Iceland, Mauro Tronto

The annual Nature TTL Photographer of the Year contest garnered more than 8,000 submissions this round, with some of the most impressive images focusing on fauna in the wild and stunning light-based phenomena that illuminate nighttime skies. Taken around the globe, the winning photos demonstrate both acts of stealth and moments of serendipity. Images range from Matt Engelmann capturing an unaware dog fox as it creeps over a Swiss mountain to Mauro Tronto framing a rainbow shooting upwards from the misty Godafass waterfalls in Iceland, the glowing northern lights overhead. See some of our favorite photos below, and visit the competition’s site to view all of the top entries.

 

“A Moment of Wilderness,” Mountains of Switzerland, Graubünden, Switzerland, Matt Engelmann

“City Hare,” Kassel, Germany, Jan Piecha

“Sunset Ray,” Tuna Factory, Maldives, Andy Schmid

“Vantage Points,” Hosanagara, Karnataka, India, Achintya Murthy

“Pretty in Pollen,” Mutter’s Moor near Sidmouth, Devon, U.K., Tim Crabb

“The Top of Australia,” Kosciusko, Australia, Josselin Cornou

“Nature Fights Back,” Loxton, Northern Cape, South Africa, Bertus Hanekom

“Ice Bear,” Klukshu, Yukon, Canada, Geoffrey Reynaud

 

 



Art

Human Ears and Animals Emerge from Dense Fields of Porcelain Foliage Sculpted by Melis Buyruk

August 5, 2022

Grace Ebert

“Habitat” (2021), porcelain, 18k gold, 101 x 101 x 10 centimeters. All images courtesy of Leila Heller, shared with permission

Cradled within wooden boxes, leaves, blossoms, animals, and the occasional bit of human anatomy form the dense topographies of Melis Buyruk (previously). The Turkish artist blends various organic elements into sprawling, monochromatic works made of porcelain that are mesmerizing in intricacy with slightly unearthly undertones. In multiple recent works like the “Blooming Light” and “Golden Bloom,” for example, a single ear appears amidst the mosses and foliage, embedding the fragmented human body part within the largely floral ecosystem.

The works shown here are included in Buyruk’s solo show titled Habitat: Bloom, which is on view through September 2 at Leila Heller. Visit her Instagram for a peek into her studio and process.

 

“Nature’s Rhythm” (2022), porcelain, 18k gold, 196 x 196 centimeters

“Blooming Light” (2022), porcelain, 18k gold decorated lightbox, 100 x 100 x 12 centimeters

Detail of “Blooming Tales” (2022), porcelain, 22k gold decorated lightbox, 120 x 120 x 12 centimeters

“Sparrow’s Habitat” (2021), porcelain, 18k gold, 100 x 100 x 15 centimeters

“Golden Bloom” (2022), porcelain, 18k gold decorated, 115 x 115 x 15 centimeters

“Blooming Tales” (2022), porcelain, 22k gold decorated lightbox, 120 x 120 x 12 centimeters