animals

Posts tagged
with animals



Art

Frenetic Animal Murals by Dzia Swirl to Life Across the World

January 4, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Since we last checked in with Antwerp-based street artist Dzia (previously), the Belgian muralist has been busy adding fauna flair to walls in an increasingly widening swath across the globe. Recent projects have taken him to China, Norway, and Spain. Dzia, who is classically trained with a masters in fine art at the Royal Academy in Antwerp, primarily depicts wild animals — foxes and birds seem to be recurring favorites. His unique style creates a mosaic of colors following the contours of the animal’s form. In his more recent work, Dzia has begun to add tonal shading within each defined area, adding a sense of volume to the well-defined figures. You can follow his work and travels on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Striking Silverware Animal Assemblages by Matt Wilson

December 18, 2017

Christopher Jobson

South-Carolina based artist Matt Wilson brings old silverware to life in his bent and welded sculptures of birds and other wildlife. Fastened to pieces of driftwood or mounted to segments of old lumber, the pieces seem to capture the lifelike essence of the robins, owls, and sea creatures they represent despite a minimal number of components. Wilson has an uncanny ability to let the found objects in his pieces speak for themselves, adapting the natural curvature of spoons and forks into folded wings and long tails. You can explore more of his work on Instagram and in his Etsy shop. (via My Modern Met)

 

 



Craft Design

Quirky New Felt Storybook Characters by ‘Cat Rabbit’

December 15, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Textile artist Cat Rabbit (previously) continues to produce a variety of croissant-headed spindly-legged felt creatures, all made by hand in her Melbourne studio. Many of the pieces seen here are special commissions, and several characters also make appearances in storybooks called Soft Stories, a collaboration with Isobel Knowles. You can see more Cat Rabbit goodness on Etsy and in her shop. (via Lustik)

 

 



Art Photography

‘The Art of Flying’ Captures the Shape-Shifting Wonder of a Murmuration of Starlings

November 30, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

A murmuration is the intricately choreographed movements of a large flock of starlings as they swoop through the sky. The phenomena appears like an undulating cloud, quickly shifting directions, density and shape as it traverses overhead. Due to a relatively warm winter in the Netherlands between 2014 and 2015, many starlings stayed in the country rather than migrating south. Filmmaker Jan van IJken captured one such air show in his short film The Art of Flying, which can be watched in full on his website. Watch the condensed version above to observe the fluidity of the birds’ movements, as well as listen to the soothing sound of the flock’s flapping wings. (via Laughing Squid)

 

 



Art

New Stoneware Animals Fraught With Human Emotion by Beth Cavener

November 9, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Through an Empty Place (The Fox Emerging from Shadow), 2017. Stoneware, paint, wood. 47h x 67w x 12d in

Through an Empty Place, detail

Beth Cavener (previously here and here) creates large animals that each appear to wrestle against their implied captivity. The works can be viewed as animals in the throes of domestication, however beneath the surface lies a peek into our own human psychology. Cavener projects these emotions onto her sculpted clay figures, showcasing the primitive animal instincts that lie beneath our own exteriors.

“Both human and animal interactions show patterns of intricate, subliminal gestures that betray intent and motivation,” said Cavener in an artist statement. “The things we leave unsaid are far more important than the words spoken out-loud to one another. I have learned to read meaning in the subtler signs; a look, the way one holds one’s hands, the incline of the head, and the slightest unconscious gesture. I rely on animal body language in my work as a metaphor for these underlying patterns, transforming the animal subjects into human psychological portraits.

Cavener’s solo exhibition The Other opens on November 15th at Jason Jacques Gallery in NYC, and runs through December 5, 2017. You can view more of the artist’s work on her website.

Kept (Variation in Cream and Grey), 2017. Resin-infused refractory material, paint, rope, wooden base. 12h x 24w x 28d in

Beloved (Rearing Deer), 2017. Stoneware, paint, bone, rope, steel. 112h x 36w x 48d in

They (Hare on Fur Pillow), 2017. Stoneware, paint, rabbit fur, foam. 34h x 73w x 30d in

Tribute (Wolf and Monkey), 2017. Stoneware, paint, hand-forged steel collars and chain. 46h x 58w x 31d in

Commitment (Two Goat Heads), 2015. Stoneware, paint, leather, steel chain, mixed media. 28h x 78w x 26d in

Commitment, detail

Limerence, 2017. Stoneware, mixed media. 22h x 44w x 16d in

 

 



Art Illustration

Graphite Illustrations That Explore the Detailed Relationships of the Natural World by Zoe Keller

October 6, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Zoe Keller creates detailed illustrations pulled from the natural world. Her fauna-based drawings are done completely in charcoal, drawing the eye to the subtle markings used to create either fur or scales. Source imagery for the works comes from nature and how it becomes mediated in books and field guides, however Keller often fills in areas of question with pieces pulled from her own inquisitions or memory.

“My curiosity about the natural world is what keeps me dialed in to my work,” Keller told Colossal. “Drawing is the best way that I’ve found to understand how organisms and ecosystems work. In order to draw something realistically you have to understand how it sits in space, how it moves, the mechanics of its insides. So for me tuning into the natural world means chasing an endless series of questions. On the most minute, piece-specific scale, this can mean asking how many whorls are in the shell of a particular species of snail. On a larger scale, I’ve been developing bodies of work that ask big questions about visually engaging with the natural world in ways that honor it and inspire others to protect it.”

Often the Portland-based artist’s subjects are related in a way that might not be known to the common viewer. This can range from a drawing of plants that are endangered in Oregon to a work concentrated on flowers that can only be found in a particular part of the US. This strategy allows a deeper research to go into her practice so that the final image is not just about aesthetics, but relates to a more immediate concern for the natural world.

Keller recently participated in a week-long backpacking artist residency called Signal Fire in the Klamath National Forest which was one of many inspirations for her upcoming solo exhibition Swarm, opening October 27 at Light Grey Art Lab in Minneapolis. You can peek further into Keller’s practice on her Instagram and Facebook. (via Hi-Fructose) 

 

 

 



Art

Blooming Metallic Birds and Other Animals by Taiichiro Yoshida

September 28, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Hanasuzume, 2013. Copper.

Artist Taiichiro Yoshida forms the delicate wings of birds and fluffy fur of mammals from a variety of sculpted metal flowers of bronze, copper, or silver. Decorative hot metalworking in Japan is considered an ancient technique, beginning sometime in the 2-3rd century BC. Yoshida achieves the fragile nature of each piece through smithing, where the hot metal is carefully beaten and then formed into blooms before being colored.

You can see more of his work on Artsy. (via Cross Connect, Hi-Fructose)

Fire Bird, 2014. Wood, grass, copper, phosphor bronze, bird’s skull.