animals

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Illustration

Black and Red Calder-Like Illustrations Combine Geometric Shapes into Spiders, Jellyfish, and Birds

January 4, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

When Adam Goldberg, founder of Santa Monica-based studio Trüf Creative isn’t crafting work for a client, the designer likes to engage his creativity with an ongoing series of minimal illustrations titled FAÜNA. The pieces combine black and red shapes and linework to form stylized versions of animals and insects, such as the one-eyed spider above or polka-dotted fish below.

Although Goldberg is directly inspired by artists such as Joan Miro, Alexander Calder, and Wassily Kandinsky, he is also influenced by the client work he has completed over the years. “The simplicity, geometry, and composure that we try to achieve with our branding work rubs off on the artwork,” he explained to Adobe Create Magazine. “I think more in terms of composition and balance more now than I ever have — and that’s because of the branding work.” You can see more of Goldberg’s agency work on Trüf Creative’s website and Behance.

 

 



Art

Mixed Media Sculptures by Michael Alm Convey the Sinuous Nature of Animal Muscles

January 4, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

"Jack Rabbit (Lepus Californicus)", 2014, wood and glass eyes, 20 x 23 x 7 inches

“Jack Rabbit (Lepus Californicus)”, 2014, wood and glass eyes, 20 x 23 x 7 inches

Seattle-based sculptor Michael Alm forms lifelike animal sculptures from carved and shaved wood, often adding realistic features such as glass eyes to complete the anatomical studies. The works imitate the natural gestures of the animals he sculpts, such as “Jack Rabbit (Lepus Californicus),” which captures the animal mid-stride.

By presenting the animal in movement we are better able to see the tension explored through thin wood strips that gracefully cross over and under each other like muscular fibers. “The gaps in the veneer accentuate the tension in the form while lightening the visual weight of the creature,” he tells Colossal. “In this piece (Jack Rabbit), I’ve highlighted the elements which contribute directly to the animal’s movement and eliminated any excess. As a result, the form looks both strong and delicate much like the animal itself.”

Alm is also a furniture maker by trade, and the byproducts of this work serves as the bulk of the material for his sculptures. After milling wood he has plentiful strips to reuse in his sculptures. “These strips are extremely flexible and when layered up they remind me of muscle and sinew,” he continues. “The more I played with this material, the more I realized the amazing number of ways it could be used.”

You can view more of his work on his website and Instagram and get a behind-the-scenes look at how he constructs his sculptures on Youtube.

"Jack Rabbit (Lepus Californicus)"

“Jack Rabbit (Lepus Californicus)”

"Jack Rabbit (Lepus Californicus)"

“Jack Rabbit (Lepus Californicus)”

 

Creation of "Jack Rabbit (Lepus Californicus)"

Creation of “Jack Rabbit (Lepus Californicus)”

Creation of "Jack Rabbit (Lepus Californicus)"

Creation of “Jack Rabbit (Lepus Californicus)”

“Anatomical Bird Wing”, 2014, wood, 16 x 6 x 2 inches

“Burrow”, 2016, wood, 20 x 24 x 9 inches

 

 



Craft

Kirie Octopus Cut From a Single Piece of Paper by Masayo Fukuda

December 28, 2018

Johnny Waldman

Kirie (切り絵, literally ‘cut picture’) is the Japanese art of paper-cutting. Variations of kirie can be found in cultures around the world but the Japanese version is said to be derived from religious ceremonies and can be traced back to around the AD 700s. In its most conventional form, negative space is cut from a single sheet of white paper and then contrasted against a black background to reveal a rendering. Veteran kirie artist Masayo Fukuda (previously) has been practicing the art form for 25 years and recently revealed what she says is her greatest masterpiece of 2018.

Although the intricate piece looks like several layers overlapped, Fukuda stayed true to the conventional form, using only a single sheet of paper to render her detailed depiction of an octopus. The level of detail at times even looks like a fine ballpoint pen drawing. But a closer look confirms indeed that each and every detail is carefully made from cut-out negative space in the white paper.

If you’re interested in Fukuda’s work, she’ll be showcasing her kirie in a joint exhibition planned for next year. She’ll be showing her work along with fellow kirie artist Jun at Miraie Gallery in Osaka from April 24 – April 30, 2019. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

 

 



Animation

A Needle-Felted Stop Motion Film Explores a Hedgehog’s Quest to Defend His Humble Home

December 20, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Hedgehog’s Home is an animated film that explores how one brave hedgehog faces off against a bevy of forest beasts to defend the honor of his beloved home. The stop motion film was created by animator and director Eva Cvijanović as an adaptation of the eponymous children’s poem by Branko Ćopić, a writer from the former Yugoslavia. The timeless tale focuses on how cultivating a safe and comfortable home reflects a large part of who we are.

The needle-felted film has won several awards, including the Best Film Award at the KIKI International Film Festival for Kids (2017), Honorable Mention at the Ottawa International Animation Festival (2017), and Best Children’s Film at the GLAS Animation Festival (2018). You can see more of her animation work on Vimeo. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

 

 



Craft Design

Geometric Animals Come to Life in DIY Lamp Kits by OWL

December 7, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

OWL, a Lisbon-based lamp brand founded by two architects in 2016, offers a wide range of friendly wild animals that can be turned into volumetric lamps using simple folding techniques. As you might guess, OWL offers a few different owl designs, as well as roaring hippos, curious rabbits, and proud penguins. Hugo Formiga and Teresa Almeida, the designers behind OWL, explain to Colossal that their “most recent designs have focused on large, endangered mammals. The selection tends to raise awareness about wildlife and simultaneously recreates the animals in a playful and abstract manner. The designs seem to trigger stories about themselves and are conceived as fun lighting objects with a hint of personality.”  You can find their range of DIY kits on Etsy. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art Illustration

Birds Sit Delicately on Vintage Sewing Machines and Typewriters in a New Illustrated Series by Steeven Salvat

December 6, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

French artist Steeven Salvat (previously) creates meticulously rendered drawings of animals inhabiting the same world as machinery, such as his previous crustacean series. His project Perchés showcases different breeds of birds using antique objects as areas for temporary rest, like the above owl which sits atop a typewriter. “I wanted to highlight the contrasts between lightness and brutality, fragility of nature and immortality of objects,” Salvat tells Colossal.

The artist works with watercolor on pastel paper, which he then draws millions of lines on top with .13mm Rotring pens and China ink. He collaborated with the Parisian studio Sergeant Paper to edit five drawings from the series in a signed and numbered limited edition of 100, which you can purchase via his online shop. You can view a time-lapse of one of his included drawings in the video below.

 

 



Art Illustration

Delicate Watercolor Landscapes Embodied by South African Wildlife

November 27, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

South Africa-based artist Sujay Sanan‘s series A Place I Know documents landscapes across the Western Cape, embedding the spaces inside animals that inhabit each. Sanan grew up in the Himalayas, and his new works are a way to explore his new surroundings, while also bringing attention to the increasing climate change and its effects on wildlife.

“My works document landscapes seen through the species that inhabit them,” he explains. “Some of the places I have painted are familiar and close to where I live, while in others I have found myself as a momentary visitor. While these works document what I fear might be lost, they are also filled with optimism.” You can see more of Sanan’s watercolor paintings on his website and Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)