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Art

Charming Wooden Animal Sculptures Designed with Articulated Torsos and Tails by Jeff Soan

October 26, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Sculptor and toy maker Jeff Soan transforms discarded furniture, driftwood, industrial pallets, and other reclaimed wood into creatures of the land and sea. Using a self-described technique called “Wobbly Wood,” Soan creates articulation in his sculptures by scoring the wood into multiple sections along their tails and torsos. This allows them to wiggle and gently move side-to-side as they are picked up or stroked. In order to eliminate as much waste as possible, the artist considers future sculptures during the building of each otter, pangolin, or mollusk. He slices shapes that might make sense for the tail of a fish, while considering the beak of a bird, or the leg of an iguana.

Soan studied art and design at Goldsmiths College in London in the 1960s, and later followed up his art training with a course in toy making at the London College of Furniture. You can see more of his sculptures and examples of “Wobbly Wood” works on his website and Instagram. (via Lustik)

 

 



Art

Ornate Birds and Sea Creatures Spring to Life With Environmental Embellishments of Flowers and Foliage

October 19, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist Ellen Jewett (previously) continues to create sculptures of animals from the land and sea, crafting realistic depictions with a surreal edge. Each porcelain creature features elaborate elements that connect the animal back to its natural environment—such as green leaves that sprout from the wings of a black cockatoo, or tiny yellow fish that are found along the spines of her ornately patterned seahorses.

After she forms each sea turtle, octopus, or fish from porcelain, Jewett free-models a wire armature by hand and coats the piece in polymer. This addition allows her to connect detailed elements such as flowers and other fauna to the animals fins or claws. Her solo exhibition On Wilderness is on view at the Ottawa School of Art’s Main Gallery in Ontario, Canada through November 18, 2018. Her work is also being exhibited in the group exhibition Nature Imagined at the Wilding Museum of Art and Nature in Solvang, California through January 2019. You can learn more about her process by following her work on Instagram.

 

 



Science

Spooky X-Rays Reveal the Bone Structures of Oregon Zoo Residents

October 18, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

As a seasonally appropriate topic for Halloween, the Oregon Zoo is posting a few of their favorite animal X-rays taken during routine health exams. Included in the mix is a branch-dwelling chameleon, open-beaked toucan, and a bat that appears to be caught mid-flight. The scans are a normal part of the check-ups at the zoo, and are used by animal experts as a helpful diagnostic tool to minimize anesthesia and provide faster results. You can follow more of the zoo’s spooky posts on Twitter.

 

 

 



Art

Animals and Statues Serve as the Protagonists of Startlingly Realistic Post-Apocalyptic Paintings by Josh Keyes

October 16, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

“Landfall” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30" × 20"

“Landfall” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30″ × 20″

Portland-based artist Josh Keyes (previously) paints hyperrealistic depictions of what he perceives the world might look like after the fall of humans. Animals such as sharks, tigers, and bulls remain as the final witnesses to the aftermath of human destruction—observing blazing fires, investigating displaced commercial objects, and swimming amongst melted ice caps. Monuments and statues also remain in this post-apocalyptic world, like in the artist’s recent painting Siren, which observes a graffiti-covered angel with a horn being splashed with the ocean’s high tide. Keyes’s solo exhibition Tempest opens on October 13, 2018 and runs through November 3, 2018 at Thinkspace Projects in Los Angeles. You can see more of his paintings on his Instagram and website. (via Supersonic Art)

“Siren” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30" × 24"

“Siren” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30″ × 24″

“End Zone” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30" × 20"

“End Zone” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30″ × 20″

“The Meadow” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 24″ × 19″

“Ascent” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 24″ × 19″

“Stairway To Heaven”(2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30" × 20"

“Stairway To Heaven”(2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30″ × 20″

 

 



Photography

Uncanny Resemblances Between Classic Dog Breeds and Humans Captured by Gerrard Gethings

September 19, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Gerrard Gethings has captured a lot of personalities as an animal photographer, including his own canine muse Baxter. Therefore when he began shooting his latest series that paired humans and look-alike dog breeds, it would only make sense that he would first focus on finding the perfect animal models before locating matching humans. For the memory game Do You Look Like Your Dog? Gethings spent a year creating images that examine the classic trope of owners looking just like their canine friends. The new game presents 25 matches, which include a long-haired Afghan and equally silky-haired owner, a messy-haired kid and his scruffy puppy, and Schnauzer with a matching beard to his leather jacket-clad owner. You can now purchase the memory game through Laurence King, and see more of Gethings’s animal portraiture on Instagram.

 

 



Photography

Amusing Finalists From This Year’s ‘Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards’

September 18, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Mary McGowan, United States, all images licensed through of The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards

Mary McGowan, United States, all images licensed through of The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards

The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards (previously) just closed submissions for their fourth annual competition which collects the most entertaining images from wildlife photographers across the globe. Last year the Overall Winner was an adorable owl caught as it nearly toppled off a branch, and the Under the Sea Winner featured a sassy sea turtle slap. This year submissions range from a disappointed rabbit, to a rhino sporting some uncharacteristic peacock plumage.

The second hardcover volume of the Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards is now available for pre-order on Amazon, and award winners for the 2018 competition will be announced on November 15, 2018. To vote for your favorite image from this year’s 41 finalists, or for more information on the competition and their conservation efforts with Born Free, visit their website. (via Kottke)

Amy Kennedy, United States

Amy Kennedy, United States

Jakob Strecker, Germany

Jakob Strecker, Germany

Barney Koszalka, United States

Barney Koszalka, United States

Patty Bauchman, United States

Patty Bauchman, United States

Daniel Friend, United States

Daniel Friend, United States

Robert Adamson, United Kingdom

Robert Adamson, United Kingdom

Kallol Mukherjee, India

Kallol Mukherjee, India 

Michael Lane, United Kingdom

Michael Lane, United Kingdom

Sergey Savvi, Russia

Sergey Savvi, Russia

Muntazeri Abdi, Indonesia

Muntazeri Abdi, Indonesia

Shane Keena, United States

Shane Keena, United States

 

 



Art Craft

Balloon Sculptures by Masayoshi Matsumoto Present Air-Filled Interpretations of the Animal Kingdom

September 17, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Masayoshi Matsumoto (previously) continues to astound us with his balloon twisting skills. The Japanese artist uses a variety of opaque, metallic, and translucent balloons to form tree-swinging monkeys, beetles, and fish out of water. When asked how he plans each of his latex creations Matsumoto explained to Colossal that each work is decided intuitively, and is dictated by whatever he feels like making in the moment. Most often the works take 3-6 hours each, depending on how many folds and colors the animal or insect might require. You can see more of his balloon sculptures on FacebookTumblr, and Instagram.