ceramics

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Craft

Minimal Faces Emerge From Sandra Apperloo's Lanky Patterned Bud Vases

April 4, 2022

Grace Ebert

All images © Sandra Apperloo, shared with permission

Nestled within polka-dotted expanses, stripes, and leafy motifs are Sandra Apperloo’s miniature faces. The quirky characters with pointed noses, freckles, and tiny, black eyes are part of the Utrecht-based ceramicist’s line of Weirdo Bud Vases, which are just wide enough to hold a stem or two within their tall, slim bodies. To create each piece, Apperloo (previously) hand-builds the rounded vessel, slip-casts facial features and arm-like handles, and finally, paints strands of hair and colorful patterns. The playful ceramics tend to sell out quickly, so you’ll want to keep an eye on her Instagram for announcements about shop updates. The next release is slated for April 10.

 

 

 



Art

Peculiar Characters by Sophie Woodrow Flaunt a Bizarre Array of Costumes and Hybrid Features

March 15, 2022

Grace Ebert

Photo by Ben Dowden. All images © Sophie Woodrow, shared with permission

Uncanny hybrid bodies, peculiar garments, and innumerable unearthly details comprise Sophie Woodrow’s troupe of porcelain figures. Living and working in Bristol, the artist sculpts the delicate, white material into characters that blur the line between nature and culture: giant ribbons wrap a horned bull in a bow, a face emerges from a cloud-like form, and multiple heads sprout from a single neck. Evocative of Leonora Carrington’s surreal creatures—the tall “Hearing Trumpet” figure is a nod to Carrington’s bizarre novel by the same name—Woodrow plays with artifice and makes it difficult to distinguish bodily features from costume or accessory.

Throughout her practice, Woodrow continually references art history, and she’s currently working on a series that contrasts wild landscapes with the human impulse to manicure and tame nature’s unruliness. You can follow her progress on Instagram. (via Women’s Art)

 

Left: “Hearing Trumpet,” porcelain, 45 centimeters. Right: “Woodwose,” porcelain, 15 centimeters

Left: “Cirrus,” porcelain, 29 centimeters. Right: “Lamas,” porcelain, 23 centimeters

“Chorus,” porcelain, 42 centimeters

“Bull,” porcelain, 16 centimeters. Photo by Ben Dowden

 

 



Art

Dots, Stripes, and Florals Amass in Dense Patches in Angelika Arendt's Amorphous Sculptures

March 7, 2022

Grace Ebert

“Die Bagage” (2018), ceramic. All images © Angelika Arendt, shared with permissio

Along with delicate flowers in porcelain, Berlin-based artist Angelika Arendt applies minuscule orbs, dots, and thin, curved lines to her meticulously textured sculptures. Amorphous in shape but distinct in the organic matter they evoke, her intricate works often mimic processes found in nature, including plant growth and cells as they swell and burst into new life. Some pieces appear mid-movement, like expanding molecules, and others drip or peel to reveal fields thick with foliage and other tactile elements.

In addition to sculpture, Arendt also creates detailed botanical drawings, and both are on view through May 8 at Berlin’s C&K Gallery, where she’s represented. Her pieces will also be included in a group exhibition at Clemens Härle brewery in Leutkirch starting in April, and you can explore more of her dense works on Instagram.

 

“Apollon” (2019), ceramic, 72 x 41 x 41 centimeters. Photo by Eric Tschernown

“Nymphe” (2019), ceramic, 47 x 25 x 24 centimeters. Photo by Eric Tschernow

Detail of “The makings of you” (2022), porcelain

Detail of “The makings of you” (2022), porcelain

“Zwei Türme” (2017), ceramic, 28 x 30 x 22 centimeters

“Come back as a flower” (2018), biscuit porcelain, 26 x 20 x 20 centimeters

 

 



Craft Food

Boinggg! Ceramic Vessels Undergo a Playful Remix with Coiled, Undulating Handles

February 24, 2022

Grace Ebert

All images © Kuu Pottery, shared with permission

Miami-born Kassandra Guzman diverges from the sleek, straight lines of minimalism in favor of squiggles and waves. She’s the ceramicist behind the Seattle-based studio Kuu Pottery, where she creates wide-mouthed vessels and playful vases mimicking bananas and other fruits. Part of her Boinggg! collection, many of the amphora and mugs have classically shaped bases with atypical handles that coil in lengthy runs and create undulating bows.

Guzman has a few projects in the works, including an illustrated series and a new body of ceramics printed with decals. See a larger collection of the artist’s pieces and browse available vessels in the Kuu shop. (via design milk)

 

 

 



Art Design

Painted Ants Crawl Across Vintage Porcelain Dinnerware by Evelyn Bracklow

February 18, 2022

Grace Ebert

All images © Evelyn Bracklow, shared with permission

Trimmed with gold and minuscule insects, Evelyn Bracklow’s porcelain dinnerware is equal parts pristine opulence and repulsion. The German artist (previously) hand-paints vintage pieces with tiny black ants that congregate over an imaginary morsel left on a plate and crawl along the mouth of a pitcher, transforming the ceramic vessels into distasteful displays.

Bracklow began adding the detailed creatures to found platters, teapots, and plates approximately 10 years ago and has made hundreds of the works since—shop the few pieces she has available on Etsy. “(Painting the ants) totally made sense to me on an aesthetical level. It was and still is a physical experience to paint or watch the ants move across objects,” she says. “It`s this feeling of the supposed movements, of the slight shuddering that always gives way to admiration for the animal and its ever new formations.”

Currently, Bracklow is working on a few large-scale projects, including a multi-faceted initiative called Antology, and she recently completed a collection of ant-laden figurines and other sculptural objects, which you can explore on her site.

 

 

 



Art Craft

Loops and Coils in Bright Gradients Grow from Claire Lindner's Ceramic Sculptures

February 6, 2022

Anna Marks

A photograph of a colourful sculpture, which appears like an organic plant-like form.

All images © Claire Lindner, shared with permission

Vine-like colorful coils of material overlap in Claire Lindner’s latest sculpture collection, which blurs the line between organic and human-made forms. Each piece has a vibrancy and motion designed to push the possibilities of the medium. “My ideas are guided by the evocation of the living,” she tells Colossal. “I try through movement and color to combine images of vegetation, the animal or the mineral world, the body as if everything was made of the same substance.”

Lindner plays on oppositions when designing her ceramics to “create a visual confusion that triggers our imagination.” She creates tensions between aesthetics and textures, including soft and hard, light and heavy, and attractive and repulsive.

Each piece is made from glazed stoneware, and before the artist starts working on a new sculpture, she envisions the “movements, flow, and colors” that make up its base and core. But as she works, she lets the material inform her choices. “Once in the making, I let myself be guided by the specificity of clay,” she explains. “I have to be attentive to its tensions, folds, and plasticity in order to make a form that will ‘flow’ and tell an interesting story.”

Lindner attended the Ecoles des Arts Décoratifs Strasbourg and developed an interest in clay from studying its organic and malleable characteristics. She compares her process to metamorphosis: how after time, one form changes into another. “Unlike glass, metal, wood, or 3D printing, working with clay felt like a prolongation of the body. It can be apprehended safely. It is soft and malleable,” she says. “It also has the ability in its process to keep all of the imprints of its manipulation, just like skin you can see the stretch marks, feel the tension, and play with the limits.”

In spring, Lindner will exhibit her work in a solo show at Maab Gallery in Milan and a group show at the MOCO La Panacée Museum in Montpellier. She is currently working on larger-scale pieces, which you can follow on her website or Instagram. (via Ceramics Now)

 

A photograph of a colourful sculpture, which appears like an organic plant-like form.

Photo by Anthony Girardi

A photograph of three colourful sculptures, which appears like an organic plant-like form.

A photograph of a colourful sculpture, which appears like an organic plant-like form.

A photograph of a colourful sculpture, which appears like an organic plant-like form.