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Art

Temporal Floral Structures Formed From Unfired Clay by Phoebe Cummings

November 13, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist Phoebe Cummings works primarily with unfired clay to create floral arrangements that are both performative and temporal. The malleable sculptures last only as long as the exhibition, and are made on-site to specifically respond to their temporary environment. The works’ forms are inspired by the natural world as well as botanical illustrations, yet their colors remain the monochromatic shade of raw clay.

The UK-based artist studied Three-Dimensional Crafts at the University of Brighton, and completed her MA in Ceramics & Glass at the Royal College of Art in 2005. Cummings has participated in several residencies across the UK and USA, including the Kohler Co. factory in Wisconsin and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. Cummings was just awarded the BBC Radio 4 Woman’s Hour Craft Prize, in partnership with the Victoria & Albert Museum and the Crafts Council. You can take a behind-the-scenes peek into her practice on her Instagram. (via Patternbank Blog)

 

 



Art

New Stoneware Animals Fraught With Human Emotion by Beth Cavener

November 9, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Through an Empty Place (The Fox Emerging from Shadow), 2017. Stoneware, paint, wood. 47h x 67w x 12d in

Through an Empty Place, detail

Beth Cavener (previously here and here) creates large animals that each appear to wrestle against their implied captivity. The works can be viewed as animals in the throes of domestication, however beneath the surface lies a peek into our own human psychology. Cavener projects these emotions onto her sculpted clay figures, showcasing the primitive animal instincts that lie beneath our own exteriors.

“Both human and animal interactions show patterns of intricate, subliminal gestures that betray intent and motivation,” said Cavener in an artist statement. “The things we leave unsaid are far more important than the words spoken out-loud to one another. I have learned to read meaning in the subtler signs; a look, the way one holds one’s hands, the incline of the head, and the slightest unconscious gesture. I rely on animal body language in my work as a metaphor for these underlying patterns, transforming the animal subjects into human psychological portraits.

Cavener’s solo exhibition The Other opens on November 15th at Jason Jacques Gallery in NYC, and runs through December 5, 2017. You can view more of the artist’s work on her website.

Kept (Variation in Cream and Grey), 2017. Resin-infused refractory material, paint, rope, wooden base. 12h x 24w x 28d in

Beloved (Rearing Deer), 2017. Stoneware, paint, bone, rope, steel. 112h x 36w x 48d in

They (Hare on Fur Pillow), 2017. Stoneware, paint, rabbit fur, foam. 34h x 73w x 30d in

Tribute (Wolf and Monkey), 2017. Stoneware, paint, hand-forged steel collars and chain. 46h x 58w x 31d in

Commitment (Two Goat Heads), 2015. Stoneware, paint, leather, steel chain, mixed media. 28h x 78w x 26d in

Commitment, detail

Limerence, 2017. Stoneware, mixed media. 22h x 44w x 16d in

 

 



Craft

Kernel Panic: New Binary Ceramics Punctuated with Typewriter Keys by Laura C. Hewitt

October 17, 2017

Christopher Jobson

From her small studio in rural Alaska, artist Laura C. Hewitt fuses the technological with the handmade, producing cyberpunk dishware and cyborg decor from wheel-thrown ceramics. A recurring theme in her work are plates, cups, and bowls speckled with 0’s and 1’s formed by vintage alphanumeric and punctuation keys from old typewriters or machinist punches. She often fires the pieces multiple times to enhance the worn appearance of each object, pieces that might look right at home on the desk of H. R. Giger. You can follow her most recent work on Instagram and she has several pieces available on Etsy.

 

 



Art Food

Decadent Pastries Formed From Porcelain and Glass by Shayna Leib

October 12, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

All photos by Eric Tadsen

Glass artist Shayna Leib (previously), like anyone, is deeply attracted to the seductive pull of decadent desserts. Unlike most however, Leib is unable to indulge. Her body reacts to several aspects of puffed pastries and chocolate mouses, causing her to have many severe dietary restrictions. It was this void that pulled her towards the desire to work with the unattainable, to recreate the objects she couldn’t eat.

“This body of work started as a therapeutic exercise in deconstruction and a re-training of the mind to look at dessert as form rather than food,” says Leib in an artist statement about her series Patisserie. “It soon became a technical riddle, and I became a food taxidermist of french pastries.”

To create the glossy sculptures she combines elements of porcelain and glass, utilizing nearly every technique for both to achieve the hyperrealistic quality of each faux dessert. Like a typical French pastry would be rolled, glazed, baked, and trimmed, Leib hot-sculpts, fuses, casts, grinds, throws, and even pipes with a theme-appropriate pastry tube. You can view more of her sweet imitations on her website, Instagram, and Facebook.

 

 



Art Craft

Aspen Trees Grow on Delicate Ceramic Vessels by Heesoo Lee

September 21, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Ceramic artist Heesoo Lee brings the textural depth of aspen forest canopies to her sculptural bowls and vases. Lee painstakingly places each and every leaf by hand, building unique, organic trees that seem to come to life with their shimmering, colorful leaves. While the vibrant glazes add a lifelike layer, the pieces are equally stunning in their unglazed form. The Montana-based artist shares many progress shots and videos on her Instagram, and works are available for purchase on Etsy. (via Lustik)

An unglazed work in progress

 

 



Craft

Colorful Crystal Explosions on Ceramic Vessels by Collin Lynch

August 30, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

It’s probably not advisable to grab hold of one of Collin Lynch’s blinged-out crystal cups before you’re fully awake. Working under the name Essarai Ceramics, Lynch specializes in oversized coffee mugs, each one a delightful riot of color and texture, with iridescent prismatic crystals seeming to explode off the surface.

Lynch works from his home studio in Albuquerque, New Mexico, where he allows each crystal formation to take shape as it is constructed. In addition to alluring surface aesthetics, Lynch also finds inspiration in his efforts to “unveil perfection through imperfection, which is where Truth lies. Nature, being the most delicate yet enduring example of this paradox, is where through the rough surfaces and shattered angles, we are reunited with ourselves.”

These mugs and other ceramic home goods are inspired by and named for specific stones like Smokey Quartz and Amethyst. Pieces are available for purchase on Lynch’s Etsy shop, and you can follow his works in progress on Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

 

 



Art

Artist Ronit Baranga’s Disturbing Anatomical Dishware Creeps Across Tabletops

July 6, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Artist Ronit Baranga (previously) creates ceramic sculptural works she describes as existing on the “border between living and still life”—objects guaranteed to either tickle your funny bone or haunt your worst nightmares, depending on your perspective. Baranga depicts dishware as sprouting human fingers and gaping mouths as the objects traipse across tabletops or physically cling to one another in a permanent embrace. The pieces are both silly and sinister as they come to life as if from a cartoon. A quick scroll through her Instagram reveals even darker works that give us the bonafide heebie-jeebies.

Ronit most recently had work on view at the Gross Anatomies show at the Akron Art Museum, and is also a contruting artist to the Small Works 2017 with beinArt Gallery through August. (via My Amp Goes to 11)

A post shared by Ronit Baranga (@ronitbaranga) on