embroidery

Posts tagged
with embroidery



Art Craft

Stitched Sculptural Installations of Everyday Objects and Gestures by Amanda McCavour

March 30, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Toronto-based textile artist Amanda McCavour uses thread and a sewing machine to construct sculptural installations that dance between two and three dimensions. McCavour stitches on a special fabric that dissolves in water to create the surfaces of thread. Through renderings of objects like sofas, kitchen tables, and backpacks, as well as arms and hands engaged in work, she explores connections to home and the fibers of the body. In an artist statement McCavor states she is interested “in thread’s assumed vulnerability, its ability to unravel, and its strength when it is sewn together.”

McCavour holds an MFA from the Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia, and she exhibits widely. Currently, her Floating Garden installation is on display at the Cornell Art Museum in Florida as part of their Flora exhibition, which opens today, March 30th, and is on view through September 9, 2018. Flora also includes Tiffanie Turner (previously), and Miya Ando (previously). You can see more of McCavour’s work on her Facebook page and via Instagram.

 

 



Art

Life-Size Embroidered Sculptures That Imitate Everyday Domestic Scenes by Gao Rong

March 21, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Gao Rong, Call No. 1, 2012, sponge, cloth, thread, wooden board. Courtesy Eli Klein and the artist © Gao Rong.

Beijing-based artist Gao Rong sews life-size replicas of everyday objects from Chinese urban and domestic infrastructure. The embroidered sculptures imitate the routine items our eyes often skip over—graffiti-covered bus signs, broken pay phones, and stacks of dirty dishes. Although her works look commonplace, many directly reference scenes or time periods from her life. Level 1/2, Unit 8, Building 5, Hua Jiadi, North Village (2010) is Gao’s imitation of the entrance to a basement apartment she rented while a student in Beijing, and 2012 her installation, The Static Eternity, is a recreation of her grandparent’s tiny rural home.

To create her sewn sculptures Gao first stitches the details of rust and other detritus onto fabric. She then wraps the material around sponges or wooden board, and stiffens the work with metal frames. Adding embroidery to her work is a way for Gao to preserve the traditional skills taught to her as a child, while taking them in a more contemporary direction. “My mother and grandmother made beautiful embroidery,” she explains. “It was their hobby. Unfortunately this skill is no longer valued, so it is being lost.”

Gao was born in 1986 in Hang Jin Hou Qi, Inner Mongolia. She received her BA from the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing, China. You can see more of her work, including these new woven hoop frames, on Klein Sun Gallery’s website. (via Lustik)

Gao Rong, Some Days Later, 2014, cloth, thread, latex foam, steel, 115 x 53 x 50 cm. Image courtesy White Rabbit Collection

Gao Rong, Some Days Later, 2014, cloth, thread, latex foam, steel, 115 x 53 x 50 cm. Image courtesy White Rabbit Collection.

Gao Rong, Detail of Some Days Later, 2014, cloth, thread, latex foam, steel, 115 x 53 x 50 cm. Image courtesy White Rabbit Collection

Gao Rong, Detail of Some Days Later, 2014, cloth, thread, latex foam, steel, 115 x 53 x 50 cm. Image courtesy White Rabbit Collection.

Gao Rong, Static Eternity, 2012, embroidered cloth, sponge, metal frame, dimensions variable, detail cupboard and thermoses. Image courtesy White Rabbit Collection

Gao Rong, Static Eternity, 2012, embroidered cloth, sponge, metal frame, dimensions variable, detail cupboard and thermoses. Image courtesy White Rabbit Collection.

Gao Rong, Static Eternity, 2012, embroidered cloth, sponge, metal frame, dimensions variable, detail cupboard and thermoses. Image courtesy White Rabbit Collection

Gao Rong, Static Eternity, 2012, embroidered cloth, sponge, metal frame, dimensions variable, detail cupboard and thermoses. Image courtesy White Rabbit Collection.

Gao Rong, 1-2 Level, Unit 8, Bldg 5, Hua Jiadi North Village, 2010, cloth, cotton, sponge, 260 x 166 x 184 cm. Image courtesy White Rabbit Collection

Gao Rong, 1-2 Level, Unit 8, Bldg 5, Hua Jiadi North Village, 2010, cloth, cotton, sponge, 260 x 166 x 184 cm. Image courtesy White Rabbit Collection.

Gao Rong, Station, 2011, embroidered cloth, sponge, metal frame, 255 x 100 x 3 cm. Image courtesy White Rabbit Collection

Gao Rong, Station, 2011, embroidered cloth, sponge, metal frame, 255 x 100 x 3 cm. Image courtesy White Rabbit Collection. 

After July 21st - Box No. 2 (2013), Embroidery, cloth, and foam. Courtesy Eli Klein and the artist © Gao Rong.

Gao Rong, After July 21st – Box No. 2, 2013, embroidery, cloth, and foam. Courtesy Eli Klein and the artist © Gao Rong. 

Detail of What Type Of Car Can A Motor-tricycle Be Exchanged For? (2013), Embroidery, Cloth, Wooden Board, Iron Shelf, Leather, And Plastic. Courtesy Eli Klein and the artist © Gao Rong.

Gao Rong, Detail of What Type Of Car Can A Motor-tricycle Be Exchanged For?, 2013, embroidery, cloth, wooden board, iron shelf, leather, and plastic. Courtesy Eli Klein and the artist © Gao Rong.

What Type Of Car Can A Motor-tricycle Be Exchanged For? (2013), Embroidery, Cloth, Wooden Board, Iron Shelf, Leather, And Plastic. Courtesy Eli Klein and the artist © Gao Rong.

Gao Rong, What Type Of Car Can A Motor-tricycle Be Exchanged For?, 2013, embroidery, cloth, wooden board, iron shelf, leather, and plastic. Courtesy Eli Klein and the artist © Gao Rong.

 

 



Craft Science

Crocheted and Embroidered Bacteria Grow in Elin Thomas’s Fiber Art Petri Dishes

March 19, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Elin Thomas creates petri dishes filled with mold, but she’s not using any week-old peanut butter sandwiches. The fiber artist builds her science experiments using a felted wool base, and then carefully crafts individual growths using crochet and embroidery techniques. Most of her creations are set in authentic 8cm borosilicate glass petri dishes, although she also makes free-form brooches and other accessories in a similar style.

Thomas has an MA in Visual Culture from Bath Spa University College, and she is based in the UK and Wales. The artist sells her work, including custom orders, on her website and Etsy store. (via #WOMENSART)

 

 



Craft

Shimmering Metallic Embroideries of Dragonflies and Other Insects by Humayrah Bint Altaf

March 13, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Bedford, England-based embroidery artist Humayrah Bint Altaf (previously) continues to construct ornate insects using shimmering threads and metallic beads. Her dragonflies, bees, beetles, and butterflies take shape using carefully paired patterns and colors that form wings, bodies, and even delicate feet. While Altaf takes artistic license with the exact shapes and colors in her embroideries, her use of bright, reflective materials adds a sense of life to these insect interpretations. The artist shares with Colossal:

I strive to create pieces that speak figuratively and literally of the colors and textures of trees, plants, beetles, bees, roots, twigs and other creatures that frequent my world. Light is an integral element of my handwork hence the materials I use reflect this. Soft gold leathers, vintage silks, antique gold cords, iridescent metal wires all call out to me and are woven into my pieces.

Altaf was recently recognized by The Worshipful Company of Girdlers for her contributions to Embroidery. She shares her work on Instagram and also sells her embroideries on Etsy.

 

 



Art Craft Photography Science

Self Portraits Embroidered With Images of Blood Vessels, Bones, and Muscle Tissue by Juana Gómez

February 28, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist Juana Gómez turns her gaze inward in order to understand the larger systems that compose the outside world. She embroiders the bones, muscles, veins, and synapsis that lie below her skin onto self-portraits, tracing her biological structures as a way to translate the similar patterns found in nature and modern civilization.

“There is fundamental law that can be seen in the veins of a leaf, the course of rivers and their tributaries, the circuits of the central nervous system, the currents of the sea, and the routes of traffic on the Internet,” says Gómez in an artist statement. “Deciphering this common language, which connects the micro cosmos with the macro cosmos, the external and the interior world, allows us to distinguish a pattern that influences inert, biological, social and cultural systems.”

Gómez first photographs sections of her body—face, torso, hands, legs, feet—which she then prints onto loose linen or another similar fabric. Next, she embroiders onto her duplicated skin, stitching brightly colored thread over her tattooed body (an element which adds another layer of texture to her personal works). In addition to these embroidered self-portraits, Gómez has also created an in situ thread-based work titled Cultivo. You can see both methods of her practice on her website.

 

 



Art Craft

A Studio Interview with Embroidery Portrait Artist Cayce Zavaglia

February 12, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Embroidery artist Cayce Zavaglia (previously) creates mesmerizing portraits of everyday people using cotton thread and wool. In this thoughtful video profile, Jesse Brass (previously) takes a closer look at Zavaglia’s process and speaks with the artist about her work. In their conversation, Zavaglia emphasizes the importance of seeing the beauty in ordinary life, and explains the symbolic significance of each portrait’s verso. She has a show of new works coming up in May 2018 at Lyons Wier Gallery in New York. Brass shares many more artist profiles on Vimeo.

 

 

 

 



Craft Food

Interactive Culinary Embroideries by Ipnot

January 25, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Japanese embroidery artist ipnot creates pieces of food and drink that seem to leap off of the fabric and into life. Ipnot enhances the realism of her embroideries by staging them with their real-life inspirations and surroundings, like piles of fluffy rice in a bowl, and slices of stollen crumbling off a miniature fork. Ipnot shares on her website that her grandmother’s embroidery practice inspired her to start, and she uses the needle and thread similarly to the painting technique of stippling. You can see more of the artist’s petite embroideries on Instagram. (via Spoon & Tamago)