flowers

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Art

Dots, Stripes, and Florals Amass in Dense Patches in Angelika Arendt's Amorphous Sculptures

March 7, 2022

Grace Ebert

“Die Bagage” (2018), ceramic. All images © Angelika Arendt, shared with permissio

Along with delicate flowers in porcelain, Berlin-based artist Angelika Arendt applies minuscule orbs, dots, and thin, curved lines to her meticulously textured sculptures. Amorphous in shape but distinct in the organic matter they evoke, her intricate works often mimic processes found in nature, including plant growth and cells as they swell and burst into new life. Some pieces appear mid-movement, like expanding molecules, and others drip or peel to reveal fields thick with foliage and other tactile elements.

In addition to sculpture, Arendt also creates detailed botanical drawings, and both are on view through May 8 at Berlin’s C&K Gallery, where she’s represented. Her pieces will also be included in a group exhibition at Clemens Härle brewery in Leutkirch starting in April, and you can explore more of her dense works on Instagram.

 

“Apollon” (2019), ceramic, 72 x 41 x 41 centimeters. Photo by Eric Tschernown

“Nymphe” (2019), ceramic, 47 x 25 x 24 centimeters. Photo by Eric Tschernow

Detail of “The makings of you” (2022), porcelain

Detail of “The makings of you” (2022), porcelain

“Zwei Türme” (2017), ceramic, 28 x 30 x 22 centimeters

“Come back as a flower” (2018), biscuit porcelain, 26 x 20 x 20 centimeters

 

 



Art

Floral Arrangements Instigate Trivial Actions in Ethan Murrow's Meticulous Graphite Drawings

March 7, 2022

Grace Ebert

“Retreat” (2022), graphite on paper, 36 x 36 inches. All images © Ethan Murrow and courtesy of Winston Wächter Fine Art New York, shared with permission

In his solo exhibition Magic Bridge, Vermont-born artist Ethan Murrow (previously) overwhelms his subjects with sprawling floral assemblages that cloud their senses and judgment. The graphite drawings center largely on figures undertaking precarious and trivial activities to exert some form of control, often through futile underwater adventures and inexplicable actions atop wooden platforms.

On view at Winston Wächter through April 30, the meticulous renderings are tinged with parody and embrace the bizarre and indeterminate. In addition to the smaller works on paper, Murrow is also creating a large-scale mural in his signature imaginative style at the New York gallery—see the work-in-progress on Instagram. Each of the pieces “mull(s) the lines between logic and belief,” he writes.

A limited-edition lithograph of Murrow’s “Planting Time” is currently available from Deb Chaney Editions, and the artist also has works on view at Winston Wächter’s Seattle space through March 19.

 

“Garnering” (2021), graphite on paper, 48 x 48 inches

“Drumbeat” (2022), graphite on paper, 48 x 36 inches

“Harmony” (2021), graphite on paper, 80 x 46 inches

“Conviction” (2022), graphite on paper, 36 x 48 inches

“Glow” (2022), graphite on paper, 36 x 36 inches

“The Vaudeville Admiral” (2021), high flow acrylic on panel, 48 x 60 inches

 

 



Photography

Conceptual Portraits by Photographer Oye Diran Fuse Raw Emotion and Whimsy

March 3, 2022

Grace Ebert

“Homegrown.” All images © Oye Diran, shared with permission

When working on location or in the studio, Oye Diran (previously) focuses on the natural grace and emotional impulses of his subjects. The Lagos-born New York-based photographer captures portraits that are refined and composed with natural elements, centering on singular figures set against calm, scenic backdrops or surrounded by flowers and fruits. Whether a personal project or commission for a magazine or fashion brand, his photos are minimal and tinged with whimsical details conveyed through elaborate hairstyles or playful, puppet-like props.

Diran’s stylized shot titled “Samsara,” which shows a figure lying supine with a mass of white blooms, is part of his recent In Between Bonds series that explores the tension between individuality and the collective through expressions of kinship. You can view the entire collection and more of the photographer’s works on Instagram.

 

“Samsara”

A commission for Blanc Magazine

Left: “Baptism.” Right: “Grounded”

“Ebonee”

“Eve”

 

 



Art Craft

Bas Reliefs by Rachel Dein Preserve the Supple Contours of Herbs, Flowers, and Plants

March 2, 2022

Grace Ebert

Stinging nettle. All images © Rachel Dein, shared with permission

Soft and fibrous, the leaves of the stinging nettle are infamous for their minuscule hairs that produce burning sensations when touched. The plant, though, is also a striking example of nature’s penchant for structural patterns and texture, with small, serrated edges and delicate ribbed veins. It’s not easy to study or touch these intricate forms without exposing a finger or hand to potential pain, a barrier made less formidable by London-based artist Rachel Dein.

For the last 11 years, Dein (previously) has plucked herbs, flowers, and other foliage from the soil and arranged her findings into new assemblages. She’s an early cultivator of the botanical bas relief technique, which involves pressing the compositions into clay and filling the impressions with plaster, concrete, and most recently, iron powder and resin. The resulting tiles, which have grown in scale from 40-centimeter squares to two-meters-long, preserve the supple shapes of sage, snowdrops, and ripe blackberries, immortalizing their unique contours and network-like systems long after they’ve withered and wilted.

Dein has multiple projects in progress at the moment: one casting Alpine plants from Switzerland and another working with the garden plants at Nunnington Hall in Yorkshire, which will culminate in an exhibition in February 2023. She’s also creating limited-edition embossed prints and exploring additional materials, like glass, iron, and copper. Shop available pieces on Etsy, and keep an eye on Instagram for new releases.

 

Weeds

Herbs

Turquoise snowdrops

Left: Geum. Right: Ribes, leucojum, and muscari

Ferns

Snowdrops

Rosemary, sage, betony, ribwort, astragalus gummifer, and alchemila

 

 



Design Food Photography

Everyday Objects Are Organized into Perfect Geometric Shapes in Kristen Meyer's Flat Lays

January 4, 2022

Grace Ebert

All images © Kristen Meyer, shared with permission

Kristen Meyer (previously) pinpoints the unique crossroads of organization and art in her meticulous flat lays. Influenced by interior decorating, prop styling, and floristry, the New Haven-based designer constructs precise geometric shapes and network-esque compositions from humble materials like eggshell shards, office supplies, candy, and disassembled bouquets. At once streamlined in material and rich in depth and texture, the dazzling works use implied outlines and negative space to construct interesting categorizations within squares and perfectly round circles.

Each work is a product of collaboration with Meyer’s husband Colin, who shoots all of the final images. You can explore an archive of her work on Instagram, and browse prints in her shop.

 

 

 



Craft Design

Exquisite Hairpieces by Sakae Recreate Flowers and Butterflies with Resin and Wire

December 20, 2021

Grace Ebert

All images courtesy of Sakae

From liquid resin and thin strips of wire, Tokyo-based designer Sakae (previously) crafts delicate hairpieces known as kanzashi. The ornamental forms are often worn for special occasions and are realistic in shape and texture, with lustrous petals and wings in translucent shades that catch surrounding light. You can see more of Sakae’s hydrangeas, irises, and daffodils on Flickr and her site, and she auctions her pieces for buyers in Japan. Follow news about international releases on Facebook.