flowers

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Art

A Massive Flower Splays Across Six Surfaces in a New Mural by Artist Mona Caron

August 3, 2020

Grace Ebert

“⁣Limonium.” All images © Mona Caron, shared with permission

An enormous flower overtakes the San José’s cultural affairs building in a multi-plane mural by artist Mona Caron (previously). Titled “Limonium,” the delicate, pink-and-green leaves spread out across the structure’s facade, transcending a single side. Wrapped around six walls and across four planes, the flower appears to be growing continuously from multiple angles.

The San Francisco-based artist says determining the spatial logistics was straightforward. She added reference points to the wall and superimposed her botanical piece to a photo, which guided her through the process. In a video posted to Instagram, Caron walks around the pastel mural to capture its illusory qualities. “The main plant faces the entrance to the Convention Center on Market Street, but to its left, there is a semi-enclosed cove, which is the entrance to the garage, and there’s another plant in there, with a flower stem that calculatedly appears to be a part of whichever plant you’re looking at,” she shares with Colossal. “Similarly, I carefully drafted the rightmost flower stem (and) leaves to appear continuous when seen both from the street and from the upper terrace.”

 

 

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Photography

Iridescent Waters Subsume Lush, Floral Bunches in Enchanting Photographs

July 30, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © STUFF Studio and bloom bloom FLEUR, shared with permission

A collaboration between photographer CheukLun LO, of STUFF Studio, and floral artist bloom bloom FLEUROceania celebrates the mysterious and dreamy qualities of the ocean. The series of photographs is centered on botanical sculptures comprised of jewel-toned petals and thick fronds that float through the dark water. Each luxuriant composition is submerged, whether fully underwater or in between the air and ocean depths.

Björk’s 2004 song by the same name inspired the vibrant series. “The full vocal simulation of the sound of the sea waves and bubbles, using singing to create a mysterious and enchanting deep-sea world, the ocean is the origin of life on Earth,” LO tells Colossal. Each floral piece represents a continent surrounded by ever-productive and elusive ocean ecosystems. “The underwater world seems to be another more colorful and spectacular land,” he says.

For a deeper dive into the enchanting projects of STUFF and bloom bloom FLEUR, which are based in Shanghai, check out Behance.

 

 

 



Animation Illustration

Delicate Gifs by Illustrator Maori Sakai Capture the Serene Moments of Daily Life

July 26, 2020

Grace Ebert

All gifs © Maori Sakai, shared with permission

Based in Japan, Maori Sakai imbues a bit of whimsy into otherwise mundane scenes through her delicately illustrated animations. Each gif is rendered largely in pastels and captures simple movements: a record spinning on a turntable, rain falling outside a window, and butterflies hovering around hydrangeas. Many of Sakai’s short animations, in addition to glimpses into her process, can be found on Instagram and Tumblr. (via Lustik)

 

 

 



Art

Gradients of Thick Petals by Artist Joshua Davison Are Layered Precisely with a Palette Knife

July 22, 2020

Grace Ebert

“Blue Hydrangea.” All images © Joshua Davison, shared with permission

Joshua Davison’s three-dimensional hydrangeas and other blooms began as an exploration of color theory. “As my thought process and work has developed, these flower studies have evolved into a complex balancing act between symmetry, saturation, and contract,” he tells Colossal.

Based in New Zealand, the 23-year-old artist has honed his process, allowing him to produce thick-petaled flowers with a single palette knife. He uses a combination of oil and acrylic paints and builds them up in layers on a solid canvas to create each sculptural piece. Always sticking to a tight color palette, Davison sometimes utilizes precise gradients to capture every shade of blue and purple.

The artist sees a strong tie between art and nature and strives to be incredibly realistic. At this stage in his practice, Davison is focused on mastering form and methods.  “I develop most of my techniques exempt from external influence,” he says. “We are so saturated with content of all kinds that I think in some ways it can stunt our creativity. I think it’s so important to consistently disconnect and explore concepts in your own mind.” While he considers nature to be art’s foundation, his details his approach to originality as follows:

As a traditional painter, I also think it can seem as though we live in a world where everything’s already been done. I believe the term original is very loosely thrown around these days and that true originality is incredibly rare but something that can be worked towards and earned. The prospect of one day achieving truly original work is the single biggest motivator for me as an artist.

Some of Davison’s vibrant blossoms are on view at Flagstaff Gallery through July 26. If you’re not in New Zealand, head to Instagram to keep up with his latest projects. (via My Modern Met)

 

 

“Gray Flower Wheel”

“Black Flower Wheel”

 

 



Art

Lush Florals and Ripe Fruit Sprout from Lustrous Glass Trees by Artist Debora Moore

July 17, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Debora Moore, shared with permission

Combining traditional glassblowing techniques and sculpting methods, Debora Moore forms lustrous glass sculptures that resemble mossy branches, fleshy petals, and entire trees. The St. Louis-born artist began by creating orchids with bulbous centers before expanding her practice to larger, organic forms. In her recent collection, Arboria, Moore sculpted delicate magnolias, plump plums, and the lavender tendrils of the wisteria.

The fragile artworks create a tension between the delicate material, the fleeting lives of flowers, and the strength and durability of nature. Moore likens her process to that of painting, where glass is used similarly to produce depth. “The material’s inherent ability to transmit and reflect light, as well as its variations from transparency to opacity, lends itself perfectly to achieve desired textures and surfaces,” she says in a statement.

To dive further into Moore’s process and see her studio, check out this interview and her site.

 

Left: “Purple Lady Slipper,” blown and sculpted glass, 35 x 21 x 8 inches. Right: “Paphiopedilum Epiphyte,” blown and sculpted glass, 35 x 9 x 9 inches

“Magnolia” from Arboria (2018), blown and sculpted glass, 104 x 112 x 30 inches

“Winter Plum” from Arboria (2018), blown and sculpted glass, 72 x 101 x 23 inches

“Winter Plum” from Arboria (2018), blown and sculpted glass, 72 x 101 x 23 inches

“Blue Lady Slippers” from Gigantica, blown and sculpted glass, 19 x 20 x 11 inches

“Wisteria” from Arboria (2018), blown and sculpted glass, 93 x 86 x 36 inches

“Wisteria” from Arboria (2018), blown and sculpted glass, 93 x 86 x 36 inches

Left: “Blue Orchid Tree,” blown and sculpted glass, 42 x 35 x 10 inches. Right: “Pink Lady Slipper,” blown and sculpted glass, 62 x 43 x 8 inches

“Blue Epiphyte,” blown and sculpted glass, 22 x 9.5 x 7.5 inches

“Magnolia” from Arboria (2018), blown and sculpted glass, 104 x 112 x 30 inches

“Blush Epidendrum,” blown and sculpted glass, 23 x 17 x 9 inches

 

 



Photography

Vivid Photographs by Trung Huy Pham Capture Annual Water Lily Harvest in Vietnam

June 26, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Trung Huy Pham, shared with permission

Each year as the Mekong Delta floods, locals gather hordes of long-stemmed lilies from the water-covered rice fields. Photographer Trung Huy Pham recently captured the annual harvest in a vivid series taken in the Long An and An Giang provinces in Vietnam. He photographs the farmers wearing canonical hats as they collect the fast-growing flowers, which often are used as decoration and as additions to hot pots. The pink water lilies swirl in the water, forming an S-shape as their stems align.

Pham shares an incredibly diverse array of shots taken around Vietnam on Instagram.