LED lights

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Art

A Towering Multi-Chromatic Tapestry of Giant Inflated Tubes Unveiled by Pneuhaus

June 24, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Pneuhaus (previously) builds inflatable structures and environments that give their audience a new perspective of the world around them. Recently, the Rhode Island-based design collective honored Providence’s history of textile manufacturing with a piece titled Pnit. The large-scale piece is illuminated by LED lights, and presents a macro exploration of a knitted form. Inflatable tubes cycle and out of each other along the wall of a concrete parking garage as they slowly rotate through different shades of yellows, greens, purples, and pinks.

“In our practice we push the boundaries of textile-based construction and so the image of the knitting swatch is also an ode to our love of fabrics, flexibility, and the strength of soft things,” Pneuhaus tells Colossal. “Pnit demonstrates these same qualities of textiles through its calligraphic curves and its weather ready durability.”

The installation was created for Providence’s art festival PVDFest, and will continuously introduce new color patterns throughout its five-month run. You can see a video of the color-changing tapestry in the video below, and view more work by Pneuhaus, such as their 2018 geodesic pinhole camera, on their website and Instagram.

 

 



Art

Nine Satellite-Shaped LED Installations Visualize the Moon’s Phases

January 7, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Nine rotating LED works light up the sky with full, waxing, and waning phases of the moon in a new installation by Taipei-based arts studio Whyixd. The work, #define Moon_, is installed on the campus of National Chiao Tung University in Hsinchu, Taiwan, and provides a completely different visual experience depending on the angle. Utilizing motors, the LED lights spin to create each shape, providing a kinetic element to the satellite-shaped structures.

The name of the project, “#define Moon_” is based off of the computer directive “#define.” The underscore denotes a part of uncompleted code, thus asking the viewer to create their own interpretation of how the installation, or moon itself, serves as a contemporary influence. You can see other kinetic light installations by the art collective, such as their Shanghai-based whirling light installation Dandelion, on their website, Instagram, and Youtube. (via designboom)

 

 



Art Design

Lust For Light: A New Book of Illuminated Installations, Sculpture, and Images in Contemporary Art

October 15, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Liz West

Liz West

Once only used to illuminate a painting or photograph, light is now commonly used as the medium itself—glowing brightly from neon tubes, programmed as an interactive installation, projected to create an intangible feeling of warmth, or flashing as an LED spectacle. In her book Lust for Light published by Gingko PressHannah Stouffer (previously) culls the practices of a variety of artists such as Liz West, Miguel Chevalier, James ClarJun Hao Ong, and Yayoi Kusama to present a wide selection of more traditional and daring examples of light-based work.

Stouffer tells Colossal that while working for the last year and a half on the 376-page collection she was overwhelmed and humbled by the impact of light, while also fascinated by what it represents. “All of the artists in this book are working to recreate its likeness, utilize it as a source of their work, and capture the inspiring glow that it produces,” she continues. “There is both a fascination and familiarity with this elemental, undeniably appealing form of energy, which is both tangible and completely uncontainable.”

There will be a release party with art installations and projections at the Ace Hotel in Los Angeles on October 25th, 2018. You can now find Lust for Life on The Colossal Shop.

James Clar

James Clar

James Clar

James Clar

Phillip K. Smith III

Phillip K. Smith III

Signe Pierce

Signe Pierce

Jun Hao Ong

Jun Hao Ong

Robert Montgomery

Robert Montgomery

Yayoi Kusama

Yayoi Kusama

 

 

 



Art

Studio Drift’s Solo Exhibition ‘Coded Nature’ Floats a Concrete Monolith Above Museum Visitors

June 25, 2018

Sasha Bogojev

Photo: Gert Jan van Rooij. Meadow (2017), choreographed in 2018. Aluminum, stainless steel, printed fabric, LEDs, robotics. Collection Studio Drift, Amsterdam, courtesy collection DELA, Eindhoven.

One of the must-see shows in Amsterdam this summer is the debut museum solo of Studio Drift (previously) at Stedelijk Museum, which balances elements of tech art, performance, and biodesign. The exhibition, titled Coded Nature, presents a wide range of transdisciplinary works from the Dutch studio that engage with topics from sustainability to issues raised by the growing use of augmented reality.

Founded by Lonneke Gordijn and Ralph Nauta, Studio Design typically creates installation, sculptural works, video projections, and interactive VR. One of the standout pieces in their new exhibition is Drifter, a floating concrete monolith measuring 13 x 6 1/2 feet, which tenderly levitates inside one of the museum galleries (the video below shows the work on display in 2017 at the Armory Show in New York). The puzzling effect of seeing such a familiar object floating through space is emphasized with a video projection of the film Drifters, which follows the same concrete sculpture as it floats through the Scottish Highlands.

Contrasting the effect of the large floating concrete block is the breathtaking installation Fragile Future Chandelier 3.5 which consists of countless bionic dandelions with glowing LED lights at their centers. The labor-intensive installation, like many of the studio’s works, challenges relationships between man, nature, and technology. Other works include the light installations Tree of Ténéré and Flylight, and kinetic installations Semblance and In 20 Steps, which are all based on naturally designed forms or movements.

Studio Drift: Coded Nature will run through August 26, 2018. You can see more site-specific installations and science fiction-inspired works on the studio’s website and Instagram, and take a deeper look inside the duo’s process in the videos below.

Photo: Sasha Bogojev for Colossal

Photo: Gert Jan van Rooij. Flylight (2009). Glass, custom made fittings, LEDs, algorithm, electronics, sensors. Courtesy Carpenters Workshop Gallery, London.

Photo: Gert Jan van Rooij. Gazm and Studio Drift, branch of Tree of Ténéré (prototype 2017). Steel, hand modeled epoxy, paint, rubber, LEDs, electronics. Collection GAZM, courtesy Pace Gallery, New York.

Fragile Future Chandelier 3.5 (2012), manufactured under the control of Carpenters Workshop Gallery. Collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam.

Fragile Future detail modules. Courtesy of Carpenters Workshop Gallery.

Ghost Collection

Photo: Tom Cornelissen. Drifter (2018), Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. Courtesy of Pace Gallery.

 

 



Art

Colorful Light Sculptures by James Clar Interpret Technology’s Effects on Our Perceived Reality

April 18, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Wheeeeeeeeeeeee! (2015), neon, 125 x 155 cm

James Clar, Wheeeeeeeeeeeee! (2015), neon, 125 x 155 cm

Artist James Clar creates sculptural light systems that interpret the ways modern technology has altered our perception of reality and time. His multi-colored works often imitate society’s relationship to the screen, such as in his work Increasing Resolution, which shows the rapid incline of digital resolution on our TVs, computers, and phones, or his 2015 sculpture Wheeeeeeeeeeeee! which expresses the loosening of language structures due to an increasing dependence on communicating through technological devices.

“The majority of our daily experience and information comes from the artificial light sources of our screens and phones, shifting our habitat from the physical space around us to the non-physical space of online digital systems” explains Clar in an artist statement.

Clar received his masters in interactive telecommunication from New York University. He has an upcoming solo exhibition at Jane Lombard Gallery in NYC later this year. You can see more of the artist’s work on his Instagram and website.

Space Is A Hologram (2014), LED lights, filters, wire, 105 x 120 cm

Space Is A Hologram (2014), LED lights, filters, wire, 105 x 120 cm

Nemo (2013), fluorescent lights, filters, 130 x 75 cm

Nemo (2013), fluorescent lights, filters, 130 x 75 cm

Binary Star, (2016), LEDs, filters, wire, 190 x 190 cm

Binary Star, (2016), LEDs, filters, wire, 190 x 190 cm

Increasing Resolution (2012), fluorescent lights, filters, 120 x 190 cm

Increasing Resolution (2012), fluorescent lights, filters, 120 x 190 cm

Thermal Energy (2013), 160 x 120 x 90 cm

Thermal Energy (2013), 160 x 120 x 90 cm

Horizontal Force (2015), LEDs, filters, wire, 220 x 120 cm

Horizontal Force (2015), LEDs, filters, wire, 220 x 120 cm

BOOM (2011), fluorescent lights, acrylic tubes and light filters, 85 x 120 cm

BOOM (2011), fluorescent lights, acrylic tubes and light filters, 85 x 120 cm

 

 



Photography

The Blinged-Out Work Trucks of Japan Photographed by Todd Antony

February 13, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

For more than 40 years Japanese truck drivers have been piling on lights, patterned fabrics, and other over-the-top adornments to their work trucks, creating moving masterpieces covered in LEDs. This tradition of decorated trucks or “Dekotora” originated from a 1970s Japanese movie series inspired by Smokey and the Bandit titled Torakku Yaro or “Truck Rascals.” Drivers first began decorating their vehicles in the style of the comedy-action films in hopes of being cast in upcoming films. Eventually the extravagant trucks became a way of life for many workers, with decoration costs to produce such elaborate vehicles sometimes running over $100,000.

Although the art form is now seeing a decline after it reached its peak in the ’80s and ’90s, the Utamaro-Kai Association of Dekotora drivers has begun to help raise funds for various charity initiatives, including areas of the country that have been hit by the recent Tsunami. Photographer Todd Antony‘s latest photographic series documents the men behind the association, taking a peek inside their cabs to view the personalization that goes into each piece of machinery. You can view more of Antony’s recent projects on his website and Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art Photography

Interactive LED Sculpture Projects Visitors’ Faces 14-Feet-Tall in Columbus, OH

December 7, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

As We Are is a 14-foot interactive sculpture by artist Matthew Mohr. The head-shaped work slowly rotates through a database of faces, displaying a range of Columbus residents and its visitors on 24 horizontal bands of LED screens. The monitors wrap nearly 360 degrees around the piece, leaving a gap for a photo studio where guests can pose for pictures that will be featured on work’s screens.

The sculpture is currently installed in the Greater Columbus Convention Center, a public venue primed for eager visitors who wish to see their faces projected more than two times their height. Its appearance reflects a few other body-centric public sculptures, namely David Cerny’s banded replication of Franz Kafka’s head in Prague, and Chicago’s Crown Fountain by Jaume Plensa which also displays a rotating cast of faces across a series of LED screens.

“‘As We Are’ presents Columbus as a welcoming, diverse culture where visitors and residents can engage on multiple levels through an interactive experience with public art,” says Mohr in an artist statement about the interactive structure. “It is an open-ended, conceptual piece that explores how we represent ourselves individually and collectively, asking participants to consider their identity in social media and in public. It asks all viewers to contemplate portraits of people from different ethnicities, and gender identities.”

Mohr also explains that the scale and location of the sculpture brings monumental recognition to each featured face, allowing the individual to be memorialized, if only for a few seconds. You can see more projects by the artist and Columbus College of Art and Design professor on his website, and view a video documenting several participants’ interactions with the sculpture below. (via Designboom)