sculpture

Posts tagged
with sculpture



Art Documentary

Life in Miniature: Medical Devices and Pre-Packaged Foods Immortalized in Tiny Sculptures by Kath Holden and Margaret Shaw

April 2, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Kath Holden constantly daydreams about the everyday objects she can transform into tiny sculptures. Even during doctor’s appointments, the U.K.-based miniaturist glances around the room to investigate which medical devices she can cull for inspiration. Holden runs Delph Minatures with her business partner and mother Margaret Shaw, a fellow miniature maker who specializes in food-related items such as pre-packaged steaks, baskets of fruit, and trays of brownies.

The pair was recently profiled in Life in Miniature, a short film by Ellen Evans which delves into the women’s studios and their opinions on the world of miniatures. Holden explains that she views other miniaturists as often being stuck in the past. She doesn’t understand the desire to recreate Georgian and Victorian houses, when you could produce objects for ordinary people, and produce objects relevant today. “I like to represent now,” she explains in the film. “The era I life in. If we don’t do miniatures of what we do now, how will it be represented in the future?”

The film premiered at the Sheffield DocFest in June 2018 and was in the official selection for Sundance Film Festival, SXSW, Hot Docs, Aspen ShortsFest, and several other festivals. You can view the short documentary in the video above, and learn more about the Holden and Shaw’s wide range of contemporary miniatures on their website.

 

 



Art

Follow Nectar-Hungry Birds as They Soar Through New Automated Flip Books by Juan Fontanive

March 26, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist Juan Fontanive (previously) constructs ornithology-oriented flip books which constantly loop with the help of a few hand-built mechanics. The still images are sourced from 18th and 19th-century natural history illustrations, and when combined imitate the motion of a bird in flight. Although these works were completed this year, Fontanive has been working on the series since 2004 while he was studying at the Royal College of Art. Previous animation explorations have featured butterflies and birds drawn with graphite and colored pencil. You can see more of his automated sculptures on his website and Vimeo.

 

 



Art

Luminescent Sculptures by Shih Chieh Huang Reference the Spectacular Attributes of Deep Sea Creatures

March 26, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

"T-24-L (Detail)" (2016-17), Mixed media, 12 x 14 x 14 feet, photo by Vince Ruvolo, all images courtesy of the artist and Ronald Feldman Gallery, New York

“T-24-L (Detail)” (2016-17), Mixed media, 12 x 14 x 14 feet, photo by Vince Ruvolo, all images courtesy of the artist and Ronald Feldman Gallery, New York

Taiwanese artist Shih Chieh Huang (previously) produces day-glow sculptures that illuminate, expand, and deflate—creating a whirling light show that both excites and relaxes the mind. His kinetic sculptures are powered by computer cooling fans and circuit breakers which are prominently incorporated into the works. Dozens of transparent plastic tentacles, LED lights, glowing liquids, and mechanical features give the pieces the appearance of bioluminescent underwater creatures who have adapted to survive in the far corners of the sea.

Huang told Colossal that his current solo exhibition Incubate at Ronald Feldman Gallery in New York addresses chaos, order, growth, and pattern, and uses brand new materials such as continuous wire, a peristaltic pump for neon liquids, and a urethane belt. His work will be included in the upcoming group exhibition Useless: Machines for Dreaming, Thinking, and Seeing at the Bronx Museum starting this upcoming Wednesday, March 27 and running through September 1, 2019. You can see more of Huang’s glowing sculptural works on his website and Instagram. A tour of his current exhibition at Ronald Feldman Gallery, which closes April 13, 2019, can be seen in the video below.

Incubate installation view (2019), photo by Vince Ruvolo

Incubate installation view (2019), photo by Vince Ruvolo

"VT-34-BTB (red angel eye)" (2017-18), Mixed media, 144 x 156 x 36 inches, photo by Megan Paetzhold

“VT-34-BTB (red angel eye)” (2017-18), Mixed media, 144 x 156 x 36 inches, photo by Megan Paetzhold

Incubate installation view (2019), photo by Vince Ruvolo

Incubate installation view (2019), photo by Vince Ruvolo

"VT-36" (2017-18), Mixed media, 10 x 10 x 12 feet, photo by Megan Paetzhold

“VT-36” (2017-18), Mixed media, 10 x 10 x 12 feet, photo by Megan Paetzhold

Incubate installation view (2019), photo by Vince Ruvolo

Incubate installation view (2019), photo by Vince Ruvolo

Incubate installation view (2019), photo by Vince Ruvolo

Incubate installation view (2019), photo by Vince Ruvolo

 

 



Art

Monochrome Monsters Squeeze into a Former Factory in a New Monumental Exhibition by Phlegm

March 19, 2019

Sasha Bogojev

Photo by Chris Saunders

Photo by Chris Saunders

The historic building of Taylor’s Eye Witness Works in Sheffield, England is currently hosting Mausoleum of the Giants, the newest sculptural installation by Phlegm (previously). The exhibition features a number of large-scale sculptures of the surreal pseudo-mythological characters he’s included in his murals worldwide. Placed inside the spacious interior of a former kitchen and pocket knife factory, these friendly giants welcome visitors to walk between and examine their appearance from every angle.

The largest piece of the show waits for the viewer just beyond the first door. This massive creature lies on the ground in an almost fetus-like position, with large arms and hands clenched as he stares through the space with wide open eyes. Visitors must walk around the monumental body to discover the rest of the exhibition and peek at what other giants rest beyond the first room.

The works are created on skeletons made of wood and wire, with papier-mâché finishing. Phlegm then paints on them in an illustrative style based on intricate patterns and using a shading effect. This technique makes them seem flat when photographed against the architectural elements of the building, yet in person, they seem bigger, heavier, and bolder. By producing the creates at a scale that barely fits inside the space, they imitate how the artist regularly uses every inch of a wall to paint his captivating murals.

Mausoleum of the Giants will be open to the public through April 6, 2019. Phlegm plans to continue his experimentations with scale by putting together a show with miniature etchings he’s been working on in the last couple of years, in addition to releasing a book of etchings. You can follow his worldwide murals and sculptures on Instagram.

Photo by Ian Cox

Photo by Ian Cox

Photo by Ian Cox

Photo by Ian Cox

Photo by Ian Cox

Photo by Ian Cox

Photo by Ian Cox

Photo by Ian Cox

Photo by Ian Cox

Photo by Ian Cox

Photo by Ian Cox

Photo by Ian Cox

Photo by Ian Cox

Photo by Ian Cox

Photo by Ian Cox

Photo by Ian Cox

 

 



Art

Colorful Ceramics Accented by Gravity-Defying Drips

March 14, 2019

Anna Marks

Photo courtesy of Bian Xiaodong

Rain falls through the air in smooth curvaceous orbs, instantaneously splitting as it splatters to the ground. Chinese artist Bian Xiaodong’s glossy ceramics resemble these falling droplets, however their inverted forms drip upwards rather than down. The artist crafts his gravity-defying artworks from kaolin clay derived from Jingdezhen —a part of east China’s Jiangxi Province known for its history of crafting porcelain.

After adding the clay to silicone moulds, Bian turns the pieces upside down and lets the natural flow of the clay create a unique shape. In the high-temperature firing process, this ultra-thin clay body further morphs into different forms. Once his ceramics are formed, the artist paints them, using an array of colorful pigments including metallic grey and sunflower yellow. “My work attempts to discover the special texture of ceramic materials, and the beauty that is brought to me by the natural forces,” he explains to Colossal. To view more of Bian’s raindrop-like artworks, visit the China Design Centre’s online gallery.

Photo courtesy of Bian Xiaodong

China Design Centre, photo by Phoebe Guo

China Design Centre, photo by Phoebe Guo

China Design Centre, photo by Phoebe Guo

Photo courtesy of Bian Xiaodong

Photo courtesy of Bian Xiaodong

Photo courtesy of Bian Xiaodong

Photo courtesy of Bian Xiaodong

 

 



Art

Miniature Figures Top Coin Purses, Makeup Compacts, and Teapots in Lush Narrative Scenes by Kendal Murray

March 13, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

"Family Style, Smile" (2012), mixed media assemblage, 11 x 13 x 10 cm

“Family Style, Smile” (2012), mixed media assemblage, 11 x 13 x 10 cm

Kendal Murray works in miniature, crafting assemblages that present familial scenes built into and on top of common items found in the home such as glass tea pots or coin purses. The objects are often covered in fake grass, and present wholesome scenarios—such as a family posing on their car in front of fall foliage, or a man taking a jog through a pasture (while being followed closely by a heard of fluffy sheep). The Sydney, Australia-based artist is currently lecturing in Design at the School of Humanities and Communication Arts at Western Sydney University, and is represented by Arthouse Gallery in New South Wales, Australia. You can see more of her playful sculptures on her website.

"Bird’s Eye View, Blue Sky Debut" (2012), mixed media assemblage, 18 x 13 x 13 cm

“Bird’s Eye View, Blue Sky Debut” (2012), mixed media assemblage, 18 x 13 x 13 cm

"Promised Land, On Hand" (2012), mixed media assemblage, 10 x 8 x 10 cm

“Promised Land, On Hand” (2012), mixed media assemblage, 10 x 8 x 10 cm

"Breakfast Time, Just in Time" (2012), mixed media assemblage, 11 x 13 x 13 cm

“Breakfast Time, Just in Time” (2012), mixed media assemblage, 11 x 13 x 13 cm 

"Exceed Speed, Mislead, Concede" (2012), mixed media assemblage, 18 x 24 x 14 cm

“Exceed Speed, Mislead, Concede” (2012), mixed media assemblage, 18 x 24 x 14 cm

"Fun Run, Dry Run" (2012), mixed media assemblage, 5.5 x 10 x 10 cm

“Fun Run, Dry Run” (2012), mixed media assemblage, 5.5 x 10 x 10 cm

"Fun Run, Dry Run" (2012), mixed media assemblage, 5.5 x 10 x 10 cm

“Fun Run, Dry Run” (2012), mixed media assemblage, 5.5 x 10 x 10 cm

"Earthward, Skyward, Homeward" (2012), mixed media assemblage, 21 x 26 x 16 cm

“Earthward, Skyward, Homeward” (2012), mixed media assemblage, 21 x 26 x 16 cm

 

 



Art

Frozen Victorian Garments Arranged into a Larger than Life Bouquet by Nicole Dextras

March 11, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Bouquet by Nicole Dextras is a composition of 15 frozen garments reminiscent of a floral arrangement, however the beauty is intended to be both enchanting and foreboding. The alluring collection of Victorian dresses was created to appear more like Venus flytraps rather than to reference romance, and speaks to mythical man-eating trees described in science fiction texts like J. W. Buel’s 1887 text Sea and Land. 

“Today we understand the use of symmetry and patterning in nature as a survival skill,” Dextras tells Colossal. “Birds and flowers in particular seem to go for the ‘big display’ to attract a mate and humans in our vanity, are susceptible to the same spell of wonder. This bouquet however was made with ice; it made its big splash in the wintery forest and within a few days it was gone.”

The collection of frozen garments was created over the course of several days during Dextras’s art residency at Banff Centre in Alberta, Canada. Dextras would spray the forms with water each night when temperatures were at their lowest to build up the right composition of icicles, and bond the garments into one large installation. Like many of her frozen installations, the work leaves no trace and is instead preserved as a subsequent photo series. You can find more of her work on her website, Facebook, and Instagram. (via Hi Fructose)