timelapse

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with timelapse



Photography

Tennis Balls and Swim Caps Crowd the Frame in New Time-Lapse Compositions by Pelle Cass

May 21, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Pelle Cass (previously) captures how humans interact with a location or an environment over time, presenting a visual history of the coincidences that occur. Over the last year and a half the Brookline, Massachusetts-based photographer has turned his lens to sports, framing sporting events from fencing to college football in order to create densely packed scenes that combine players from multiple images. During the course of one game or match he might take upwards of 1,000 photographs to provide the content for endless combinations of movements and poses. The final result is a still time-lapse photograph which condenses an hour or so of play into one dynamic image. Cass has a solo exhibition at Camerawork Gallery in Portland, Oregon that runs through May 31, 2019. You can see more of his dynamic series on his website and Instagram. (via Booooooom)

 

 



Photography Science

Salt Crystals Dance and Grow Across the Screen in a Time-Lapse by Wenting Zhu

May 6, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Dalian, China-based videographer Wenting Zhu spent seven months creating The Arctic, a time-lapse video that explores the vastly different crystallization processes of salts. Crystals formed from salts including potassium nitrate and sodium sulfate explode like fireworks or appear to freeze like ice when seen through an accelerated lens. The film was created for Beauty of Science (previously), an ongoing series that presents aesthetically intriguing videos about science with a focus on chemical reactions. You can see more of Zhu’s macro photography on Behance and more footage from Beauty of Science on Vimeo. (via The Morning News)

 

 



Photography

Restless Cities Cycle Through Day and Night in Time Slice Videos by Dan Marker-Moore

May 1, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Global metropolises known for their 24/7 energy glimmer around the clock in captivating time slice videos by Dan Marker-Moore. The skylines of Los Angeles, Kowloon, London, and Shanghai move through dawn, daytime, and dusk in precise slivers that capture specific moments of natural and man-made light. In an interview with Adorama, the photographer explains that he usually uses between 20 and 40 unique images to strike a balance between providing noticeable visual shifts and containing the busyness. The resulting images convey the endless motion of city life while also forming unusual geometric shapes that center around specific architectural details like LA’s Griffith Observatory or London’s Big Ben clocktower.

Marker-Moore, who is based in Los Angeles, works as a photographer, cinematographer, producer, and director. In addition to his vast trove of personal and editorial projects, he also has a decade of experience in animation and motion graphics for commercials. Marker-Moore is passionate about the technical aspects of still and moving images, and shares extensive notes on his blog and Lightroom tutorials on YouTube. You can see more from Marker-Moore on Instagram, and also check out his worldwide pay phone documention.

 

 



Art

Human-Powered Clocks by Maarten Baas Physically Mark the Passage of Time

March 14, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Dutch artist Maarten Baas produces artworks that lie at the intersection of visual art, performance, and design, creating manual clocks that are erased and redrawn on the stroke of each minute. In pieces like Grandfather Clock and Schiphol Clock Baas places himself within the structure of the time-telling devices, functioning as the works’ human mechanism. Other pieces from his Real Time series use the assistance of another performer to create 12-hour films, such as a line of perpetually swept trash doubling as a clock arm. Baas began the time-based series in 2009 at the Salone Del Mobile in Milan, Italy, and has a current piece in the group exhibition Design by Time at the Pratt Institute through April 13, 2019. You can see more of his works on his website, Instagram, and Vimeo, and in the videos below.

 

 

 



Amazing Food

Endless Layers of Colorful Candy Melt Away in a Satisfying Timelapse Video

February 27, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

The creators of the Let’s Melt This YouTube channel are anonymous connoisseurs of melting, having put a torch to everything from flat screen TVs to hamburgers. They put a classic candy to the test, using a 1900°F blow torch to melt a famously long-lasting giant jawbreaker candy ball. The task took 3 minutes and 46 seconds, and the video itself is sped up to about a minute and a half to show the satisfying removal of colorful layers. The graffiti-splattered white coating gives way to layers of vibrant orange, yellow, blue, green, and red as the candy steadily shrinks. Let’s Melt This has been less active of late, but you can explore their archive of melts on their YouTube channel. (via The Awesomer)

 

 

 



Craft Design

Time-Lapse Video of Woodworker Keith Williams Shows How Flat Plywood Boards Become Smooth Patterned Spheres

January 7, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Woodworker Keith Williams of Oddball Gallery in Minier, Illinois creates geodesic spheres that balance math and art. Each sculptural form is created from 170 wood triangles that are then hand-assembled into 12 pentagons and 20 hexagons. Next these shapes are glued together into an angular 180-sided ball that is placed onto a lathe and transformed into a completely smooth sphere.

As Williams removes approximately 1/4″ of wood, natural rings from the plywood are brought to the surface, covering the final piece in a dizzying array of concentric circles. You can watch a behind-the-scenes look at how these objects are made in the video above. FInd more peeks into the Oddball Studio on Williams’ website and Youtube. (via Laughing Squid)

 

 



Animation Science

The Milky Way’s Glimmering Core Captured in a Timelapse Video by Adrien Mauduit

September 7, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

When not working for a NASA-funded citizen-science project, Adrien Mauduit travels the world seeking out remote places to create photographs and films of the night sky. To the naked eye, the galaxies around us appear as single points of light; Mauduit’s “astro-lapse” visuals showcase the dimensionality of the universe through specialized photo and video equipment. His most recent video, Galaxies Volume III, is the third in the astro-lapse series and focuses on the core of the Milky Way.

Mauduit explains in a statement about the project that from a young age he has been interested in  the natural wonders of the environment, and by “showing the true beauty of the universe I could contribute in my own limited way to bringing the real dark skies to the hectic and light polluted urban jungle.” The resulting film includes dramatic shots of shooting stars, silhouetted mountains, and rushing clouds foregrounding the shimmering night sky. You can see more of Mauduit’s work on Vimeo and Instagram. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)