Ornate Embroidery Patterns Stitched into Metallic Objects

Ornate Embroidery Patterns Stitched into Metallic Objects embroidery
Greed, 2012. Metal spoon, cotton, Cross stitch, drilling. Photo courtesy Modestas Ežerskis.

Ornate Embroidery Patterns Stitched into Metallic Objects embroidery

Ornate Embroidery Patterns Stitched into Metallic Objects embroidery

Ornate Embroidery Patterns Stitched into Metallic Objects embroidery
Life is Beautiful, 2005. Metal lid, cotton. Cross-stitch, drilling. Photo courtesy Modestas Ežerskis.

Ornate Embroidery Patterns Stitched into Metallic Objects embroidery
Life is Beautiful, 2005. Metal lid, cotton. Cross-stitch, drilling. Photo courtesy Modestas Ežerskis.

Ornate Embroidery Patterns Stitched into Metallic Objects embroidery
Bucket of Light, 2010. Sunflower, 2010. Metal parts, cotton, wire, bulb. Cross-stitch, drilling, welding. Photo courtesy Modestas Ežerskis.

Ornate Embroidery Patterns Stitched into Metallic Objects embroidery
Every Stick Has Two Ends, 2012. Shovel parts, wood, cotton. Cross-stitch, drilling. Photo courtesy Modestas Ežerskis.

Ornate Embroidery Patterns Stitched into Metallic Objects embroidery
Daily Bread to Give to as Today, 2009. Metal bowl, cotton. Cross-stitch, drilling. Photo courtesy Modestas Ežerskis.

Ornate Embroidery Patterns Stitched into Metallic Objects embroidery
After Party, 2013. Tin can, cotton. Cross-stitch, drilling. Photo courtesy Modestas Ežerskis.

Ornate Embroidery Patterns Stitched into Metallic Objects embroidery
Between City and Country, 2009. Metal bucket, watering can, milk can. Cross-stitch, drilling. Photo courtesy Modestas Ežerskis.

Ornate Embroidery Patterns Stitched into Metallic Objects embroidery
Rococo, 2007. Metal plate, cotton. Cross-stitch, drilling. Photo courtesy Modestas Ežerskis.

Ornate Embroidery Patterns Stitched into Metallic Objects embroidery

In an attempt to subvert traditional embroidery culture, Lithuatian artist Severija Inčirauskaitė-Kriaunevičienė applies standard floral and decorative patterns found in embroidery magazines to metallic objects like plates, spoons, lamps and even car doors. The juxtaposition of functional objects emblazoned with traditional textile work is certain unexpected and little amusing, an aspect Severija further illustrates with some of her more humorous pieces depicting cigarette butts embroidered at the base of a tin can, or the skewed reflection of a person’s mouth on the edge of a spoon. From an essay on her work by Dr. Jurgita Ludavičienė:

Employing irony, Severija conceptually neutralizes the harmfulness of kitsch’s sweetness and sentimentality. Irony emerges in the process of drawing inspiration from the postwar Lithuanian village, with which artists have lost connection today, or from the destitute Soviet domestic environment, which women were trying to embellish with handicrafts, no matter what kind of absurd forms it would take. The intimacy of indoors freed from all tensions is the essence of coziness, that is crystallized in Severija’s works as cross stitch embroidery on various household utensils not intended for it.

You can see much more of her embroidery work right here.

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