Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Using dismembered plastic parts from old dolls and other toys, artist Freya Jobbins assembles these exceedingly strange portraits of people and pop culture icons. Chances are when viewing these you fall firmly into one of two camps: the highly amused or the highly disturbed. Regardless, it’s hard to deny the incredible amount of labor that goes into each piece, from the exploration of form and the use of color to make each anatomical amalgamation.

Born in Johannesburg, South Africa and raised in West Sydney, Jobbins is influenced in part by Guiseppe Archimboldo’s fruit and vegetable paintings as well as Ron Mueck’s oversized humans. I first encountered Jobbins’ work close-up at the Toy Cycle exhibition in Tel Aviv back in December courtesy of Kinetis, and despite the mild case of heebie-jeebies it was impossible to look away as I tried to figure out how each piece came together.

You can see more freaky faces over in Jobbin’s online gallery and on Facebook. (via Juxtapoz, FastCo)