Photography

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Photography Science

Two Biologists Explore the Remote Rainforests of the Ecuadorian Andes to Document Fungi

January 8, 2018

Christopher Jobson

All photos © Danny Newman

Biologists estimate that 3.2 million species of fungi may exist on Earth, and of that only around 120,000 are known to science which leaves potentially millions organisms of left to discover, photograph, and document before it’s too late. The majority of undescribed species live in the tropics where mycologists Danny Newman and Roo Vandegrift have traveled extensively to document fungi in regions threatened by climate change and development.

In 2014, the pair traveled to Reserva Los Cedros, one of the last unlogged watersheds on the western slope of the Andes, where they took all of the photos seen here. The reserve has since been declared open for mining by the Ecuadorian government and the habitat that spawned these unusual mushrooms is slated for destruction. “The identification and description of rare or endemic species from the reserve will help demonstrate the value of these habitats and the importance of their conservation,” shares Newman about the project.

As part of a January residency at the University of Oregon, Newman is now working to sequence the DNA of 350 fungi samples found at Reserva Los Cedros and is seeking support from the public to help fund the project at cost. You can see more photos from their discoveries in Ecuador on Mushroom Observer. Also, do yourself a favor and check out the caterpillar at 0:50 in the video below.

 

 



Art Photography

Surreal Moments Composed with Familiar Objects by Photographer Elspeth Diederix

January 8, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Photographer Elspeth Diederix captures everyday objects and moments in a surreal light. Her photographs are simply presented yet arduously composed, with most images taking days of preparation and design to achieve the right appearance. Although Diederix is inspired by familiar objects, it is when she stumbles across these materials in a foreign landscape that the true magic of her photographic practice is revealed.

“It is only when I am out of my everyday life and free from its repetition that I have the space to truly see what is around me,” Diederix told Time Magazine. “Being in places unknown to me forces those abstract moments to appear more frequently and allows me to concentrate on finding the right location for the right object.”

Diederix was born in Nairobi, Kenya in 1971, and raised in Colombia. She studied painting and sculpture at the Gerrit Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam between 1990 and 1995, and at the Rijksakademie in Amsterdam from 1998-2000. You can see more of Diederix’s work on her website, and view recent experiments between gardening and photography on her Instagram and blog.

 

 



Photography

Nearly Frozen ‘Slurpee’ Waves Surge off the Coast of Nantucket

January 4, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All photos © Jonathan Nimerfroh. Licensed for use on Colossal.

With single digit temperatures and massive snow storms sweeping the northern United States, it’s no surprise that most things are going to freeze. This includes the waves just off the shore of Nantucket, which turned into a slurry of rolling ice when temperatures dropped to 12 degrees Fahrenheit this week. On January 2nd photographer Jonathan Nimerfroh not only captured the phenomena of these partially frozen waves crashing against the shore, but also an extremely brave surfer (Jamie Briard) weathering the icy conditions.

“I ran up and down the beach, taking as many shots as I could of this freezing, fleeting show of nature,” Nimerfroh tells Colossal. “Slurpee waves are the kind of thing you might only be lucky enough to see once, so I count myself as very lucky to have seen them twice.”

Just two years ago the photographer captured waves of a similar slushy consistency off the same shore. You can follow more of Nimerfroh’s seaside photography on Instagram.

 

 



Photography Science

A Burst of Deep Sea Fireworks: A Rare Jellyfish Filmed by the E/V Nautilus

January 3, 2018

Christopher Jobson

Researchers aboard the E/V Nautilus (previously) celebrated the new year with an unlikely guest, a beautiful Halitrephes maasi jellyfish found at a depth of 4,000 feet underwater at the Revillagigedo Archipelago off Baja California, Mexico. The vibrantly hued jellyfish looks like an impressive burst of fireworks when lit, but would otherwise travel in almost completely visual obscurity.

“Radial canals that move nutrients through the jelly’s bell form a starburst pattern that reflects the lights of ROV Hercules with bright splashes of yellow and pink,” the Nautilus crew shares. “But without our lights this gelatinous beauty drifts unseen in the dark.”

You can follow regular discoveries aboard the Nautilus on their frequently updated YouTube channel.
(via Core 77)

 

 



Art Photography

Colorful Portraits of Adoptable Dogs Photographed by Paul Octavious

January 3, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Photographer Paul Octavious (previously) casts new light on Chicago’s adoptable dogs through a collaboration with PAWS, the city’s largest no-kill animal shelter. Octavious, an editorial and commercial photographer, explained to Colossal that he was on a shoot for NBC when he thought to pair the vibrant HUE lighting setup with rescue pups that were set to be photographed with characters from a NBC TV show. Octavious ended up spotlighting the animals themselves with the HUE lighting, resulting in these colorful portraits, and he has continued to volunteer his time helping to get Chicago’s homeless pets adopted with his ResHue Dog series. You can follow Paul on Instagram and learn more about available pets at PAWS.

 

 



Photography

New Photographs of Waves Crashing Against the Setting Sun by Warren Keelan

January 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Australian photographer Warren Keelan (previously here and here) completely immerses himself in his subject matter, wading alongside gigantic waves to capture the perfect break. Keelan is fascinated by the unpredictable nature of ocean swells, in addition to how the changing sunlight dictates the way each movement is captured.

Keelan manages to develop a story with the moments he photographs by carefully following how waves interact with natural elements such as the setting sun or a chance rainbow on the horizon. The New South Wales-based photographer has compiled 12 of his most captivating recent photographs into a 2018 calendar available on his website. You can see more of his work on his Instagram and Facebook.

 

 



History Photography

A Norwegian University Student Used a Spy Camera in This Amazing Example of 19th Century Street Photography

January 2, 2018

Christopher Jobson

All images courtesy the Norwegian Folk Museum.

Fredrik Carl Mülertz Størmer is known mostly as an accomplished mathematician and physicist from Norway, but as a side hobby he was also an amateur photographer, taking to the streets of Oslo with a bulky camera secreted in his clothing to capture candid moments of unsuspecting passersby. Most of his photos were taken in the 1890s while Størmer was a 19-year-old student at the Royal Frederick University using a Stirn Concealed Vest Spy Camera, a secretive camera with a narrow lens designed to poke through a vest pocket’s buttonhole.

Størmer’s photography stands in stark contrast to portraiture of the era that consisted mainly of staid and unsmiling images against decorative backdrops. Here we see a rare view of people going about their daily lives nearly 125 years ago, often smiling and perhaps caught off guard from the young student angling for the shot. To see more of Størmer’s work head over to Norwegian Folkmuseum. (via Bored Panda)

 

 

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