Art Design

Color Palettes of Historic Paintings Subdivided with Algorithms by Dimitris Ladopoulos

January 25, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Athens-based motion graphics and visual designer Dimitris Ladopoulos uses a series of algorithms to subdivide his favorite works of art, breaking down the color compositions of centuries old paintings in the 3D animation software Houdini. With this process, Ladopoulos digitally observes the palette of Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn‘s Portrait of Johannes Wtenbogaert, in addition to examining the thousands of specific shades used to compose Rembrandt Peale‘s portrait of his daughter Rosalba.

The two digital compositions provide a contemporary view of historical paintings, showcasing how each might be analyzed as a designed object rather than a painted work. You can see more of Ladopoulos’s projects, like this earlier experiment with algorithm-based geometric patterns, on the designer’s website and Behance.

 

 



Art Design Science

Precise Metallic Replicas of Ancient Fossils and Cells by Allan Drummond

January 25, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Cell Division

By day, D. Allan Drummond is Assistant Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology at The University of Chicago, where he runs the Drummond Lab. After hours, his interest in evolution and cellular structure takes a different, tangible form. Drummond constructs exacting replicas of creatures from the deep fossil record, paying specific attention to the detail of their underbellies, which are often obliterated by the passage of time. Drummond shares with Colossal:

So far, as a scientist, I’ve been on a slow journey to the bottom, to the deepest level of detail, from seeking to explain patterns of evolution spanning the tree of life, to probing how cells react to their environment, to tinkering with the pieces and parts of molecules swarming inside those cells. The details go all the way down, remaining absorbing and also consequential, worth knowing about and studying. That sensation of unexpectedly interesting detail is what I try to capture in my sculpture.

Each creature is sculpted digitally by Drummond using scientific references, including specimens from private collections. Next, they are 3D printed in wax, and finally lost-wax cast in bronze and finished by hand. The sculptures are rendered down to the smallest detail, including gills, antennae, legs, and even mitochondria in cell division. Drummond shares his in-progress and completed pieces on Instagram and several works are available for sale on his website as jewelry or decorative artifacts.

Trilobite, Ceraurus Species

Trilobite, Ceraurus Species

Trilobite, Ceraurus Species

Trilobite, Ceraurus Species

Trilobite, Ceraurus Species

Sphinx Moth, Hyles Lineata

Sphinx Moth, Hyles Lineata

Sphinx Moth, Hyles Lineata

Trilobite, Hoplolichas Furcifer, in process

Trilobite, Hoplolichas Furcifer

 

 



Art

Writhing Organic Sculptures Formed from Nails by John Bisbee

January 24, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Viper, Welded Spikes, “Out of the Garden.” Fuller Craft Museum, Brockton, MA, Dimensions Variable, 2016. Photo: Nick Benfey.

Over the past three decades, artist John Bisbee (previously) has dedicated his creative work to the medium of nails. Recent artwork includes several large installations that transform the stiff, architectural material into writhing organic shapes. “Out of the Garden” seems to reference the Biblical tale, with an enormous snake piercing the Fuller Craft Museum‘s wall with its fangs and a fruit-laden tree nearby. “Infinity Pool,” a circular wall installation, features larger spikes at the outer circumference that shrink to smaller nails toward the center, lending a dramatic sense of depth to the two dimensional work. Bisbee, who is based in Maine, has displayed his work across the northeastern US, and his upcoming 2018 show will be at the Center for Maine Contemporary Art in Rockland, Maine.

Viper, detail.

Viper, detail.

Infinity Pool, Forged, Welded, 8, 6, 4, 2 and 1-inch Spikes, “The Needle and The Milkmaid”, SAPAR Contemporary, New York, New York, 58” x 58” x 3”, 2016, Photo: Nick Benfey.

Infinity Pool, detail.

Infinity Pool, detail.

Infinity Pool, detail.

Pods, Welded Spikes and Weld, “The Needle and The Milkmaid”, SAPAR Contemporary, New York, New York, Dimensions Variable, 2016, Photo: Nick Benfey.

Murmur, Welded, Hammered, 8, 6, 4, and 2-inch Spikes, “The Needle and The Milkmaid”, SAPAR Contemporary, New York, New York, Dimensions Variable, 2016, Photo: Nick Benfey.

Murmur, detail.

Murmur, detail.

Brittlestars, Forged, Welded, 12­inch Bright Common Spikes, Harvard Business School, Boston, MA, 113”x 241”x 1”. 2016, Photo: Nick Benfey.

 

 



Animation

Negative Space: A Short Film That Explores a Father-Son Relationship Through the Art of Packing

January 24, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Presented above is the trailer for the stop-motion film Negative Space, co-directed by Baltimore-based animators Max Porter and Ru Kuwahata. The short film is an adaptation of the eponymous poem by Ron Koertge, which tells the story of a relationship between a father and son through the organized art of packing. Although both directors immediately connected with the message of the poem, the piece struck a personal chord with Kuwahata whose father had worked as an airline pilot.

“I remember my dad adjusting his watch precisely before leaving the house and I remember the packing list that he pinned to the wall of his study,” Kuwahata told Variety. “My most vivid childhood memories are connected with objects, textures, and ordinary routines.”

The directors wanted to highlight these specific textures and feelings associated with everyday objects and clothing, bringing a sense of believability to each ritualized scene. Over the course of three months Porter and Kuwahata’s team fabricated each tiny sock, shirt, and belt from the original material, ensuring an idealized portrayal of the main characters’ connection and bond over perfected packing.

The film was just nominated for an Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film. You can view a behind-the-scenes peek at the making of the animated short in a video by IKKI Films below, and watch trailers for the rest of the nominees on Short of the Week.

 

 



Art Illustration

Paul Saari’s Mysterious Dreamworlds Set in Melancholy Landscapes

January 24, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Canadian oil painter Paul Saari imagines mesmerizing worlds, which he renders in pastel tones. In some works, the softness of his painting style and the candy-like colors add to the mystical, dreamlike quality of the feathery forests and twinkling skies. In others, the soft colors and brushstrokes are jarred by ominous swirling weather patterns and dark, melancholy shadows. Saari shares his work on Instagram. If you like Saari’s work, also check out Julie Heffernan. (via CrossConnect Magazine)

 

 



Art

Museum Visitors Invited to Crawl and Slide Inside Massive Suspended Tape Structure

January 23, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Photographs by Dan Hodges and Rich Sanders

The Des Moines Art Center’s recent exhibit, Drawing in Space, highlighted four artists working in the medium of tape. The show included Numen/For Use (previously), an artist collective based in Vienna and Zagreb. Their interactive sculpture, called simply “Tape,” is made exclusively of clear packing tape, suspended within the art center’s I.M. Pei-designed architecture. Museum visitors are encouraged to explore the piece from the inside out—as long as they wear socks and move through the structure in a clockwise direction. Numen’s exhibit at the Art Center closed on January 21st, and we’re looking forward to seeing where it appears next. Previous iterations have been built in Paris, Frankfurt, and Vienna. See more of Numen/For Use’s work on their website and Facebook.

 

 



Art

New Plant-Based Embroidery and Interconnected Baskets by Ana Teresa Barboza

January 23, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Peruvian artist Ana Teresa Barboza has previously been drawn to recreating full landscapes with yarn and thread, embroidering large tapestries with rivers, valleys, and waves that spill out from the wall and rest on the floor. Barboza continues her exploration of installation-based tapestry with a new body of work that charts the growth of individual plants, while also expanding her practice into weaving with a new work of interconnected baskets.

Her series Increase charts a plant’s shadow for 15 days, steadily tracing its growth and movement over the two week time space. Balls of yarn lay at the foot of each tapestry, providing a visualization of the diminishing material as it is slowly added to the changing portrait. The colorful embroidery provides a charged glow around the white space of the original plant, its increasing mass illustrated in a collage of jagged shapes and vibrant hues.

Barboza’s new work United Baskets, retreats from color altogether, instead focusing on process and shape. The piece is a collection of seven interconnected baskets, which took the artist 30 days to weave from bundles of Huacho reed. The series of vessels vary in size and position, yet are each seamlessly linked throughout the full 10 by 10 foot composition.

Although Barboza now works with textiles, she previously studied painting at Lima’s Pontifical Catholic University. You can see more of her embroidered and woven installations on her website here.

 

 

A Colossal

Highlight

Artist Prints