Brunch Reimagined in the Style of Five Iconic Artists 

Artisan Brunch series. Image inspired by Alexander Calder. (All images via Kyle Bean)

For issue 24 of Kinfolk magazine, Designer Kyle Bean collaborated with photographer Aaron Tilley and food stylist Lucy-Ruth Hathaway to depict how famous artists might reimagine their weekend brunch spreads. The five sculptural works in the series Artisan Brunch balance pancakes and their toppings in a Alexander Calder-like mobile, suspend a halved avocado in what appears to be a Damien Hirst formaldehyde cube, and dot a patchwork of bread slices with ketchup in the style of Yayoi Kusama. The photographic series also references the artistic styles of Cornelia Parker and Salvador Dali with a flavorful twist. You can see more inventive work by the series’ collaborators on their Instagrams @kylejbean, @aaron_tilley, and @lucyruthfood, and check out a previous collaboration between Bean and Tilley in their series Anxious Anticipation.

Image inspired by Salvador Dali

Image inspired by Damien Hirst

Image inspired by Cornelia Parker

Image inspired by Yayoi Kusama

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Why Knights Fought Snails in the Margins of Medieval Books 

When thinking of a symbolic foe to battle in a medieval book, many creatures come to mind: dragons, wolves, or perhaps rabbits, but the poor defenseless snail? It hardly makes for a powerful image. But it turns out, as with most artwork, the answer is more symbolic than literal. In the 1960s a book historian named Lilian Randall thought the illustrations found in the margins of illuminated books required more attention, leading to the publication of her own book, Images in the Margins of Gothic Manuscripts. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards shares what Randall learned as she investigated the curious snail fights.

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Artist Shows That Putting Googly Eyes on Inanimate Objects Never Gets Old 

Ah yes, eyebombing, the street art equivalent of drawing a funny mustache on Mona Lisa. So ubiquitous it’s impossible to credit anyone for inventing it… and yet for some reason it never quite stops being hilarious? Or maybe it’s just me. Probably just me. Vanyu Krastev of Eyebombing Bulgaria helps keep it alive. (via Tastefully Offensive, Quipsologies)

Update: Did you know there’s a Googly Eyes Foundation? Supposedly they will even send you free googly eyes.

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The First Blue Pigment Created in Over 200 Years to be Used in a Crayon 

YInMn blue (photo courtesy Oregon State University)

YInMn blue (photo courtesy Oregon State University)

The first blue pigment to have been created in over 200 years will serve as the newest Crayola crayon. “YlnMn blue” was not developed within an arts context, but rather accidentally discovered in in an Oregon State University (OSU) chemistry lab in 2009. Graduate student Andrew Smith made the discovery alongside Mas Subramanian after combining manganese oxide, yttrium, and indium, elements which also serve as the inspiration for the pigment’s name.

“Most pigments are discovered by chance,” Subramanian explained in a statement. “The reason is because the origin of the color of a material depends not only on the chemical composition, but also on the intricate arrangement of atoms in the crystal structure. So someone has to make the material first, then study its crystal structure thoroughly to explain the color.”

YlnMn blue has a unique elemental structure which allows its manganese ions to absorb red and green wavelengths of light, only reflecting back a deep blue. This color is so durable that even when placed in oil or water it does not fade which makes it an attractive and versatile commercial product.

Shepherd Color Company, which received exclusive licensing to YlnMn blue in 2015, has since partnered with Crayola to launch its newest crayon. YlnMn blue’s name will be replaced this summer after a public rebranding contest by Crayola which ends June 2. The vibrant blue will take the place of Crayola’s yellow Dandelion crayon, which is being retired after a 27-year-run. (via Hyperallergic)

Photo courtesy of Karl Maasdam/Oregon State University

Professor Mas Subramanian gazes at YInMn blue which was discovered in his lab in 2009. (Photo courtesy of Karl Maasdam/Oregon State University)

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Animated Subway Maps Compared to Their Actual Geography 

New York by playhouse_animation

Designing a public transit map can be a complicated process, taking months if not years to create a concise layout that can be interpreted quickly for commuters on the go. To make things easier to understand the obvious decision is to use symbolic geography in lieu of real maps so that everything fits in a legible manner. Over at the subreddit r/DataIsBeautiful, Reddit user vinnivinnivinni had thew idea to create an animated comparison of a Berlin subway map compared to its real geography. The post went viral and several other users chimed in with their own contributions. Gathered here are some of the best examples, but you can see a few more on Twisted Sifter (gotta love Austin).

Berlin by vinnivinnivinni

Tokyo by -Ninja-

Singapore by wrcyn

Shanghai by KailoB6

São Paulo by sweedishfishoreo

Washington D.C. by stupidgit

Oslo by iamthedestroyer

Montreal by weilian82

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A Giant New 5,000-piece CMYK Color Gamut Jigsaw Puzzle by Clemens Habicht 

As a follow-up to his wildly popular 1,000 Color Puzzle, artist Clemens Habicht scaled-up his deviously complicated jigsaw by a factor of five with the new 5,000 Colors Puzzle. The vibrantly monstrous puzzle is comprised of 5,000 differently colored pieces that form a 6.5 x 2.5 foot CMYK color gamut. For hyper-dedicated puzzlers only. Now available in the Colossal Shop.

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