Photography

San Francisco Shrouded in Dense Fog Captured by Michael Shainblum

December 19, 2017

Christopher Jobson

In a relentless pursuit to capture the frequently shifting weather patterns of the San Francisco Bay Area, photographer Michael Shainblum (previously) has stalked scenic outlooks around the city for close to a decade. The city is especially famous for dense fog and low-lying stratus clouds that roll in almost daily during the summer, resulting in the surreal scenes he loves to photograph and film. Shainblum shares in a statement about the ongoing body of work:

The Fog in the bay area feels like it has a mind of its own. The fog can often times disturb a beautiful sunny day and cover the sky with darkness. There are mixed feelings about the fog, many residents finding it a huge inconvenience and depressing. Where as many residences embrace the fog and its erratic behavior. Regardless of how the fog is perceived from below. It’s hard to ignore just how incredible it looks from above. This series is a tribute to the incredible fog and a showcase of its magnificent beauty. Fog has essentially become a living breathing entity in San Francisco.

You can see more of his Symphony of Fog series on his website and by following him on Instagram. He also occasionally teaches timelapse workshops and sells prints of his best shots.

 

 

 



Sponsor

Courses Begin January 22 at the School of Visual Arts (Sponsored)

December 18, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Print by Daniel Shepard

From one-day workshops to semester-long courses, take the opportunity to immerse yourself and be inspired. Courses are available in:

   — Advertising
   — Animation
   — Computer Art, Computer Animation, and Visual Effects
   — Design
   — Film and Video
   — Fine Arts
   — Illustration and Cartooning
   — Interior Design
   — Photography
   — Professional Development
   — Visual and Critical Studies
   — Visual Futures Lab
   — Visual Narrative

How to Register / Advice on Courses

School of Visual Arts has been a leader in the education of artists, designers and creative professionals for more than six decades. With a faculty of distinguished working professionals, dynamic curriculum and an emphasis on critical thinking, SVA is a catalyst for innovation and social responsibility. SVA represents one of the most influential artistic communities in the world.

School of VISUAL ARTS, Division of Continuing Education
E-mail: [email protected] / Toll-free phone: 877.242.7200
Check out the latest issue of our newsletter: ContinuED

 

 



Design

A 17-Story Dragon Climbs Thailand’s Pink 80-Meter Buddhist Temple

December 18, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

The Samphran district of Thailand holds one of the most unique Buddhist temples found in the country. The bright pink temple, called Wat Samphran, stands 17-stories high and is wrapped in a scaly green dragon. The design of the structure came to the founder of the temple during a 7-day fasting meditation, and is built 80 meters tall to honor the number of years that Buddha lived.

Visitors can climb the great building and touch the dragon’s beard or large talons from an access point on the roof. You can get a 360 perspective on the gigantic temple in the Great Big Story video below.

 

 



Art

Striking Silverware Animal Assemblages by Matt Wilson

December 18, 2017

Christopher Jobson

South-Carolina based artist Matt Wilson brings old silverware to life in his bent and welded sculptures of birds and other wildlife. Fastened to pieces of driftwood or mounted to segments of old lumber, the pieces seem to capture the lifelike essence of the robins, owls, and sea creatures they represent despite a minimal number of components. Wilson has an uncanny ability to let the found objects in his pieces speak for themselves, adapting the natural curvature of spoons and forks into folded wings and long tails. You can explore more of his work on Instagram and in his Etsy shop. (via My Modern Met)

 

 



Art

100 Fiberglass and Resin Skulls Fill a Room at the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne

December 16, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Ron Mueck, an Australian artist known for his hyperrealistic figural sculptures, has created his largest work to date. His installation Mass contains 100 human skulls which are scattered and stacked throughout a gallery at the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne, Australia.

The individual forms are created from fiberglass and resin, and when stood upright, rise to approximately three feet tall. In some areas of the installation piles reach five skulls in height, while in others visitors can approach individual works resting on the gallery’s floor. Placed amongst gilded paintings the works offer a somber reality, a morose peek into what physically relates each of us.

Mass opens December 15, 2017 as a part of the inaugural National Gallery of Victoria Triennial. Mueck is one of 100 international creatives that has contributed work to the exhibition which will run through April 18, 2018. (via Designboom)

 

 



Craft Design

Quirky New Felt Storybook Characters by ‘Cat Rabbit’

December 15, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Textile artist Cat Rabbit (previously) continues to produce a variety of croissant-headed spindly-legged felt creatures, all made by hand in her Melbourne studio. Many of the pieces seen here are special commissions, and several characters also make appearances in storybooks called Soft Stories, a collaboration with Isobel Knowles. You can see more Cat Rabbit goodness on Etsy and in her shop. (via Lustik)

 

 



Art

‘Salt Years,’ Explores Sigalit Landau’s Lifetime Relationship With the Dead Sea

December 14, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Israeli artist Sigalit Landau (previously) has a practice that is deeply tied to working with the Dead Sea. Landau uses the hypersaline body of water as both a photographic backdrop and medium to suspend everyday objects, creating densely salt-encrusted sculptures. The items she chooses for her pieces are sometimes simply based on their textures and shapes, while others are chosen in order to filter memories that have been passed down to the artist through her parents and grandparents.

“These objects leave ‘the game’ of being useful ‘things’ and enter a new realm – the open space of representation,” said Landau to Colossal. “They loose their old features and dimensions and inhale a certain pureness of spirit, treated by climate and enhanced by emotion.”

A new book titled Salt Years, explores Landau’s process, bringing a new perspective to her salt crystal sculptures, video art, and images created over the last 15 years. Within the book Landau explores her process of “baptizing” objects in the Dead Sea’s waters, showcasing how the salt-filled sea breathes new life into the inanimate works through behind-the-scenes photos, and personal notes and essays.

You can pre-order the 288-page book through Landau’s Indiegogo campaign, and follow its progress through the book’s Facebook.

 

 

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