Track Shorts: A Short Film Series with Colossal at Lost Arts 

Still from Other Side of the Woods by Anu-Laura Tuttelberg.

Colossal is hosting a short-film program this Saturday night in Chicago at Lost Arts as part of a new series called Track Shorts. Echoing Lost Arts’ role as a laboratory and workshop for creatives working with their hands, Colossal brings together a collection of stop-motion short films that celebrate the physical labor of bringing stories to life on screen. This Track Shorts event is an hour-long program featuring over a dozen films by animators from nine countries. The screening is outdoors on an old railway loading dock at Lost Arts.

Shorts by PES, Laura Stewart, Kirsten Lepore, Norman McLaren, Anu-Laura Tuttelberg, Timothy Reckart, Gemma Green-Hope, and many others. We have just a few seats left, tickets are only $5.

An Inflated Roof of Spikes Protrude From a Crumbling Scottish Gatehouse 

Three white inflatable installations protrude from the landscape in Scotland’s Mellerstain’s House and Gardens, works that inhabit two aging structures and a lake that belongs to the estate built in 1725. The installations, which are collectively titled XXX, are by environmental artist Steven Messam (previously) and aim to present a contemporary twist on the marble sculptures that were meant to originally decorate the home’s grounds.

As of this year the grounds have been opened as a site for open-air contemporary works, with Messam’s pieces creating the first exhibition at the newly opened Borders Sculpture ParkScattered, a series of 6 to 13-foot spheres bob on the surface of the lake, available for investigation by the small canoes one can rent on site. Pointed, a spiked protrusion from the former gatehouse of the estate, fills the center of the building, extending out only from the roof in a series of 28 10-foot peaks. Finally, Towered juts from the center of a crumbling old laundry building in a series of tubes, its columns reaching over 26-feet-high.

The County Durham-based artist mainly works outside of the gallery, producing ephemeral installations like 2015’s PaperBridge which spanned a small English creek with 22,000 perfectly stacked pieces of bright red paper. You can see more from his XXX installation, and view future Border Sculpture Park exhibitions on the park’s Instagram. (via DesignBoom)

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Minimalism & Multitude: The Swarming Animated GIFs of Frédéric Vayssouze-Faure 

French animator Frédéric Vayssouze-Faure explores complicated mathematical concepts through short animations he publishes on a Tumblr called Wavegrower. Sine functions, harmonic oscillations, and fractals are all core concepts behind his undulating and swarming animations. Via his artist statement:

This blog is a branch of the wavegrower project in which I’m focused on combining minimalism and multitude to create dynamic artworks with more than one level of reading, the first being that every cell constituting them has its own simple periodic motion, meaning regularly looping by spinning or twisting or stretching or balancing or revolving or swinging or shaking or beating or vibrating, in a word : oscillating.

As with several other designers and artists working with animations of this nature, Vayssouze-Faure shares the source code behind some of his works to help others learn how they work. You can see much more here.

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Archeologists Unearth Ancient Smiley Face on a 3,700-Year-Old Jug 

A team of Turkish and Italian archeologists working on a site in southern Turkey discovered an interesting object recently, an ancient smiley face drawn on the side of an off white jug. The faded face is simplistically drawn, two black dots hovering over a crooked arch just below, and is so subtle it was not noticed until it had been transported to a lab for restoration.

“The smiling face is undoubtedly there (there are no other traces of painting on the flask) and has no parallels in ancient ceramic art of the area,” said Dr. Nicolo Marchetti of Bologna University, who led the excavation.

The crew had been at the site of its discovery for the last seven summers, an area that was once the ancient Hittite city Karkemish. The object is unlike anything else they have encountered in the area, however it was not the only important thing unearthed. The team also found 250 clay bullae, or tokens that would have been attached to legal documents, a large basalt relief of two griffons, and the remains of both a fortress and grain silo.

The architectural site will be open to the public next year as the Karkemish Ancient City Archaeological Park. You can visit the ancient smiley close by when it goes on display at the Gaziantep Museum of Archaeology. (via The History Blog)

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Delicate Botanical Tattoos by Pis Saro 

Crimea-based tattoo artist Pis Saro (previously) brings plants to life on the surface of her clients’ skin, articulating near photo-realistic images of delicate ferns and flowers that traverse spines and encircle wrists. Collected here are a number of works from the last year, and you can see lots of additional new work on her Instagram.

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Conceptual Illustrations That Unveil Hidden Worlds by Andrea Ucini 

Self-taught Italian illustrator Andrea Ucini draws scenes which reveal hidden plot lines, adding a conceptual twist to his minimalistic imagery. Within Ucini’s illustrations one can sneak a peek behind the veil of a shadow or streetlamp, uncovering another world or just a curious rodent. In addition to working as an illustrator, Ucini also composes music and plays several instruments, a pastime that he sites as a strong influence for his illustrations which have been included in Wired, Scientific America, Entrepreneur Magazine, and more. You can view more of the Denmark-based illustrator’s work on his InstagramBehance, and Anna Goodson Illustration Agency where he is currently represented.

 

 

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