Artist Charles Young’s Growing Metropolis of 635 Paper Structures 

489_640

Last year we were thrilled to discover this little paper world constructed by artist Charles Young who conceived of the idea as a 365-day creative project to explore different architectural forms through paper, every single day for a year. Except… it turns out he never stopped. The tiny paper metropolis has now grown to 635 buildings, many with moving parts that Young expertly animates and shares daily on his Tumblr. The entire papercraft city will be on view from November 10-26, 2016 at the NEoN Digital Arts Festival in Dundee, Scotland.

565_640

602_640

paperholm_group_06_2

paperholm_group_09

paperholm_group_10

paperholm_neon_03

paperholm_neon_05

closeup

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Explosive Scrap Timber Assemblages by Louise McRae 

mcrae-1

New Zealand-based artist Louise McRae works with pieces of discarded wood that are hand-split into small fragments and then carefully reassembled into intricate wall sculptures. The pieces often resemble aerial views of sprawling cities or macro views organic growths, accentuated with acrylic paints, foil, or even charring the piece with fire outright. You can see more of McRae’s abstract cubist wall pieces at Seed Gallery and Gallery 33. (via Tu Recepcja)

mcrae-2

mcrae-3

mcrae-4

mcrae-5

mcrae-6

mcrae-7

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Members of a Brazilian Indigenous Tribe Projected Onto the Amazon Rainforest by Photographer Philippe Echaroux 

echaroux_07

In a gesture to draw attention to the massive deforestation ravaging the Amazon rainforest, French photographer and street artist Philippe Echaroux projected the faces of indigenous Brazilians onto the forest’s trees. The projected images demonstrate the deep connection between the rainforest and its inhabitants, acknowledging the need for the preservation of their home and resources.

The photographs focus on the Suruí tribe of Brazil which is led by Chief Almir Surui Narayamoga and was asked by the Brazilian government to help replant their section of the rainforest in order to ensure and protect its longevity. Echaroux was invited by Chief Narayamoga to bring attention to the issue, which he highlighted through his projections.

Photographs from this series will be on display in the exhibition “The Crying Forest” at Galerie Taglialatella in Paris opening November 11 and running through December 15, 2016. You can see more of Echaroux’s work on his websiteInstagram, and Facebook, as well as a behind-the-scenes making of his work (in French) below. (via PetaPixel)

echaroux_06

echaroux_05

echaroux_04

echaroux_03

echaroux_02

echaroux_01

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Stylish Embroidered Houseplants and Interiors by Sarah K. Benning 

emb-1

Fiber artist Sarah K. Benning is self-taught in the craft of embroidery but brings her background in fine art to every artwork she creates. Each piece first begins as an illustration where she draws inspiration from the aesthetics of Midcentury design, interior design trends, and often making reference to her own houseplant collection. To better capture her subject matter Benning often eschews traditional embroidery techniques and stitches in favor of bold and improvised methods that better represent contemporary design.

Benning graduated in 2013 from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago with a BFA in Fiber and Material Studies, and now splits her time between Baltimore and Spain. She frequently updates her Instagram and Facebook pages, and you can find new works available in her online shop. She also sells original patterns through subscriptions on Etsy. (via Booooooom)

emb-2

emb-9

emb-3

emb-4

emb-8

emb-5

emb-6

emb-7

emb-10

See related posts on Colossal about , .

New Glitched Sculptures of Women Chiseled from Wood by Yoshitoshi Kanemaki 

yoshi-3

Japanese sculptor Yoshitoshi Kanemaki (previously) produces figurative sculptures with varying abnormalities and glitches, doubling the eyes on some works, while multiplying the heads on others to convey an impressive array of human emotion. Each piece, with sizes ranging from life-size to miniature, is first sketched directly onto a large section of camphor wood and then chiseled to match the absurd female form. You can see more sculptures from Kanemaki on his Behance and Facebook.

yoshi-2

yoshitoshikanemaki_09

yoshitoshikanemaki_10

yoshitoshikanemaki_04

yoshitoshikanemaki_05

yoshitoshikanemaki_03

yoshitoshidouble

yoshitoshikanemaki_01

yoshitoshikanemaki_06

yoshitoshikanemaki_08

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Stunning Highlights from the 2016 International Aquatic Plants Layout Contest 

0001_pc

#1 (Grand Prize) Takayuki Fukada, Japan / All images courtesy IAPLC & Aquabase.

Since the 1990s, an intrepid group of aquascaping artists have gradually raised the bar of what’s possible with the design of a traditional aquarium. Using only natural elements, the aquariums you see here are years in the making to ensure plants and animals all exist in harmony while trying to achieve merits on an exhaustive list of aesthetic criteria. Over 2,000 participants from 60+ countries submit designs for the annual International Aquatic Plants Layout Contest (IAPLC) and here are some of our favorites from this year.

The 2016 winner was Takayuki Fukada (who also won last year’s grand prize) and you can see more photos on Facebook courtesy André Albuquerque of AquaA3.

0002_pc

#2 Chao Wang, China

0003_pc

#3 Junichi Itakura, Japan

0004_pc

#4 Katsuki Tanaka, Japan

0005_pc

#5 Adriano Montoro Nicácio, Brazil

0006_pc

#6 Yoyo Prayogi, Indonesia

0012_pc

#12 Yi Ye, China

0014_pc

#14 Yanfei Qian, China

0018_pc

#18 Wei Chen, China

0019_pc

#19 Yucheng Pan, China

0021_pc

#21 Hoai Nam Vu, Vietnam

0027_pc

#27 Juan Puchades Rufino, Spain

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Page 8 of 783«...78910...»