A Statue of a Defiant Girl Now Confronts the Famous ‘Charging Bull’ on Wall St. 

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If you happen to walk by the famous bronze Charging Bull statue in New York’s financial district today you’ll discover a fantastic new addition: a small girl in a defiant and unflinching pose now stands just feet away from the tip of the wild bull’s horns. The bronze sculpture was installed on Tuesday morning as part of a joint effort between State Street Global Advisors (a $2.5 trillion asset manager) and city officials just ahead of International Women’s Day. The artwork is part of a campaign to pressure companies to add more women to their boards, but will surely speak more broadly as symbol of women’s rights and empowerment within society as a whole.

Lori Heinel, the deputy global chief investment officer at State Street shares with Business Insider:

“One of the most iconic images on Wall Street is the charging bull. So the idea of having a female sort of stand against the bull or stand up to the bull just struck us as a very clever but also creative and engaging way to make that statement. Even though it’s a little girl, her stance is one of determination, forwardness, and being willing to challenge and take on the status quo.”

The statue, officially titled The Fearless Girl, was created by Delaware-based bronze sculptor Kristen Visbal and will remain for at least a month. The piece is already drawing large crowds and extensive coverage in the press. Charging Bull was originally an act of guerrilla art by Arturo Di Modica, and only became permanent after its soaring popularity, leaving some to wonder if Visbal’s statue could follow the same story. You can watch a video about its creation below.

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Pejac’s Newest Series “Redemption” Utilizes Pressed Wood as Canvas 

Spanish street artist Pejac‘s work (previously) is known for its subtle interaction with urban environments, small interruptions to everyday buildings like bird-shaped cracks created in an abandoned power plant’s windows, or trompe l’oeil paintings scattered through the streets of the district of Uskudar.

Pejac’s newest series brings an urban resource into the studio rather than having the artist travel out. Utilizing pressed wood as a pseduo-canvas, Pejac draws with black ink and pencil to produce soft deer, birds, and flowers in the works’ foregrounds. These natural elements showcase the wooden medium’s origin, highlighting how natural environments are continuously being chopped down and constructed over.

“The beauty of the pressed wood seems to hide the arrogance of man in its relation with nature,” said Pejac. “These panels have some sort of aesthetic warmth but at the same time a sense of devastation, making it very contradictory, which directly refers to my way of understanding art. Expressing myself on thousands of small pieces of wood feels like ‘tattooing’ on the stripped skins of trees. Each drawing in this Redemption series are tribute to nature. Any other subject would have been frivolous.”

You can see Pejac’s other series posted on his website. (via Juxtapoz)

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A Stunning View of the Northern Lights over Iceland Reflected in a Volcanic Crater Lake 

Last month photographer Sigurdur William camped out at the edge of the Kerid volcanic crater lake in Iceland where he captured this unusual view of the Northern lights and stars reflected on the water’s surface. Located in southern Iceland the Kerid is one of many crater lakes in the area that are frequented by locals and tourists alike, some of which visit through William’s photography tour business ArcticShots. (via Astronomy Picture of the Day)

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Imaginative Insects Formed From Resin and Brass by Hiroshi Shinno 

Japanese artist Hiroshi Shinno builds hyperrealistic sculptures of insects that don’t exist, perfect forms of imaginative species that look as if they were built from vibrant leaves and delicate flower petals. Even these aspects of the creatures are false, as each leaf or petal was cast from resin and painted with acrylic paint before being placed on the model’s brass base.

In addition to building these fantastical works, Shinno also sketches the initial ideas for his imaginative creatures in an Insect Diary on his website. You can see more of the Kyoto-born artist’s insect-based sculptures and 3D work on his Tumblr. (via Lustik)

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Next-Level Food Carving on Fruits and Vegetables by ‘Gaku’ 

Japan has a rich tradition of food carving called mukimono. If you’ve ever eaten at a fancy restaurant in Japan you might have found a carrot carved into a bunny, garnishing your plate. But in the hands of Japanese artist Gaku, the art of fruit and vegetable carving is elevated to a new realm of edible creations.

One constraint to carving fruits and vegetables is that sometimes you must work fast. The moment a peel is removed, oxidization will start to discolor your artwork. So, depending on the variety, Gaku’s carvings are probably created within several minutes. Armed with a tool similar to an x-acto knife and a fruit or vegetable from the grocery store, Gaku carves intricate patterns that are often inspired by traditional Japanese motifs.

Gaku points out that the banana is great fruit to practice with because it’s cheap and easy to carve. When asked what he does with all his creations after he’s done, his reply is simple: he eats them. “Except for the banana peel.”

You can see more of Gaku’s creations on his Instagram account. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

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Billboards That Advertise the Surrounding California Landscape by Jennifer Bolande 

All photos by Lance Gerber / courtesy of the artist and Desert X

Jennifer Bolande‘s work Visible Distance / Second Sight, is not one that you stop your car at and observe, in fact, its not one that even requires slowing to admire. The several billboard installation stretches alongside the Gene Autry Trail and Vista Chino in California, bordering the roads with scenic images of the same mountains that peak out behind each piece. In some instances the images match perfectly with the surrounding range, creating an alignment of fabricated reality while one zooms past the display.

Similar to artist Brian Kane‘s billboard displays of forests and galaxies in Massachusetts in the summer of 2015, Bolande’s work calls attention to nature in a ceaseless vacuum of pushy advertising. By placing images of the environment beside the roadway Bolande hopes to point passersby back to the landscape itself.

The piece is part of the exhibition Desert X which also features Doug Aitken’s mirror-covered house. The exhibition runs through April 30, 2017, and you can see a full schedule of tours and events on their website. (via Designboom)

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