Tag Archives: architecture

Footage of Osaka’s Skyline Transformed into a World Where Architecture Grows Organically 

In this fantastic short titled Spatial Bodies, actual footage of the Osaka skyline is morphed into a physics-defying world of architecture where apartment buildings twist and curve like vines, suspended in the sky without regard for gravity. The film was created by AUJIK, a collaborative of artists and filmmakers that refers to itself as a “mysterious nature/tech cult.” From their statement about Spatial Bodies:

Spatial Bodies depicts the urban landscape and architectural bodies as an autonomous living and self replicating organism. Domesticated and cultivated only by its own nature. A vast concrete vegetation, oscillating between order and chaos.

The film seems to draw inspiration from the architectural experiments of Victor Enrich who similarly toys with the idea of structures behaving in impossible ways. Music composed by Daisuke Tanabe. (via Vimeo)

bldg-2

bldg-1

bldg-3

bldg-32

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

New Architectural Watercolors by Maja Wronska 

maja-1

We’ve long enjoyed the work of painter and architect Maja Wronska (previously) who depicts unique vantages of architectural sites through detailed watercolors. Not only does Wrońska capture these buildings in their entirety, but also focuses on the specific details of their construction and environment such as chandeliers that hang within an ancient church, or the pigeons found circling its exterior. These elements are all produced with an eye for how to capture the character of a space rather than just its aesthetic, imbuing her paintings with the rich history found within each location.

Many of her pieces are available as prints and other objects on Society6. You can see more of Wronska’s works and pieces in progress on her Instagram.

maja-10

maja-2

maja-6

maja-3

maja-4

maja-7

maja-8

maja-5

maja-9

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Rafael Araujo’s Architectural Renderings of Life Now as a Coloring Book 

Copy of cb-cover-mockup-front-hr

Architect and illustrator Rafael Araujo (previously) drafts beautiful three-dimensional spaces in a studio without technology, connecting himself back to nature while he meticulously demonstrates the Golden Ratio’s role in the natural world. In an attempt to pass on this meditative quality about his process and work, Araujo is creating the Golden Ratio Coloring Book. This book is currently on Kickstarter along with video documentation of Araujo’s process, which he has been fine-tuning for the last 40 years.

“I was 15 when I started noticing intelligent patterns in the world of nature—spirals, sequences, proportions,” said Araujo. “This secret of nature’s beautiful designs unfolded before my very eyes. Everything I draw is by hand. I don’t use a computer, just a pencil, compass, and a protractor.”

Araujo’s prints are also available in the Colossal Shop.

raf-1

Copy of cb-cover-mockup-back-hr

Copy of cb-internal-pages-mockup-7

raf-2

Copy of cb-internal-pages-mockup-8

Copy of cb-internal-pages-mockup-9

raf-3

Copy of cb-internal-pages-mockup-16

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

An Early Christian Church Resurrected in Towering Wire Mesh by Edoardo Tresoldi 

©Blindeyefactory_EdoardoTresoldi_Le Basiliche_2016_09

all images © Blind Eye Factory

With hundreds of yards of wire mesh artist Edoardo Tresoldi has built an interpretation of an early Christian church that once stood in its place at the current Archaeological Park of Siponto, Italy. Built with the assistance of the Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities and the Archaeology Superintendence of Puglia, the installation connects ancient archaeology with contemporary art. The sculpture stands on the former church’s site with a ghostly presence, looking almost like a hologram illuminated in the park. Despite its sheer appearance the installation contains detailed architetural elements including tiered columns, domes, and statues that stand within the structure.

You can see more of Tresoldi’s work on his Facebook and Behance.  (via Designboom)

©BlindEyeFactory_EdoardoTresoldi_S.MariadiSiponto_2016_001

©BlindEyeFactory_EdoardoTresoldi_S.MariadiSiponto_2016_021

©BlindEyeFactory_EdoardoTresoldi_S.MariadiSiponto_2016_023

©Blindeyefactory_EdoardoTresoldi_Le Basiliche_2016_33

©BlindEyeFactory_EdoardoTresoldi_S.MariadiSiponto_2016_042.

©BlindEyeFactory_EdoardoTresoldi_S.MariadiSiponto_2016_027

©BlindEyeFactory_EdoardoTresoldi_S.MariadiSiponto_2016_075.

©BlindEyeFactory_EdoardoTresoldi_S.MariadiSiponto_2016_085.

©BlindEyeFactory_EdoardoTresoldi_S.MariadiSiponto_2016_086.

©BlindEyeFactory_EdoardoTresoldi_S.MariadiSiponto_2016_090.

©BlindEyeFactory_EdoardoTresoldi_S.MariadiSiponto_2016_107.

©BlindEyeFactory_EdoardoTresoldi_S.MariadiSiponto_2016_098.

©BlindEyeFactory_EdoardoTresoldi_S.MariadiSiponto_2016_103.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

New Miniature Architectural Structures Carved Into Raw Stone by Matthew Simmonds 

Matt_Simm02

“Corona” (2016), Faxe limestone, height 30cm

Matthew Simmonds (previously) sculpts miniature architectural structures from raw stone. Part of his interest in producing these pieces is centered around the contrast between the carved precision of his hand against the rough nature of the natural material he chooses for each work. The pieces’ concept also deals with this human influence on raw environments, humans physically displaying their beliefs and achievements by building large physical forms.

“In my sculptures I am concerned with the common human achievement; the cultural expressions thrown up by different societies, and how the various cultural traditions interact with and influence each other,” said Simmonds in an interview with Colossal. “Stone is the thing that survives the most from older times, and has an inherent sense of strength and permanence that has given it a central role in historical architecture. It is also a natural material, and in this way it inherently has a connection with the Earth’s past.”

Simmonds work Ringrone was commissioned for a client who owns a castle in Ireland that lays in ruin. Simmonds’ sculpture depicts what he believes to be the castle’s original appearance as a “tower house” from the 15th century in which vaulted rooms would be stacked upon each other with twisting passages. The miniature form responds to this internal maze by its play with light, which he hopes “encourages this sense of exploration.”

You can see more of the Copenhagen-based artist’s work on his website.

Matt_Simm10

“Tetraconch” (2015), limestone, height 31cm, all images courtesy of Matthew Simmonds

Matt_Simm05

“Ringrone” (2016), Faxe limestone, height 61cm

Matt_Simm09

“Ringrone” (2016), Faxe limestone, height 61cm

Matt_Simm08

“Ringrone” (2016), Faxe limestone, height 61cm

Matt_Simm07

“Ringrone” (2016), Faxe limestone, height 61cm

Matt_Simm06

“Ringrone” (2016), Faxe limestone, height 61cm

Matt_Simm04

Ringrone – material, Faxe limestone, 2016, height 61cm

Matt_Simm01

“Ararat: study II” (2016), Faxe limestone, height 20cm

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

This New Cycle and Pedestrian Tunnel in Amsterdam Features an 80,000 Tile Mural Inspired by Cornelis Boumeester 

tunnel-1

Recently constructed by Benthem Crouwel, this expansive new pedestrian and cycling tunnel in Amsterdam features a fantastic tile mural depicting a fleet of ships in rough seas. The 361-foot path called the Cuyperspassage connects the city center to the IJ waterfront and sees some 15,000 commuters daily.

The darker cycling lane incorporates sound-absorbing asphalt and steel grates, while the pedestrian side is almost completely wrapped in a mural of 80,000 delft blue tiles. The artwork was designed by artist Irma Boom, heavily inspired by the work of Dutch tile artist Cornelis Boumeester. The two lanes are further delineated by LEDs to create a safe multi-function corridor with minimal barriers. From Benthem Crouwel:

Along the footpath wall is a tile tableau designed by Irma Boom Office. The design steps off from a restored work by the Rotterdam tile painter Cornelis Boumeester (1652-1733). His tile panel depicting the Warship Rotterdam and the Herring Fleet is in the collection of the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. Irma Boom replaced the original crest on the stern with the Amsterdam coat of arms. The cyclist or pedestrian leaves the old historic part of Amsterdam through Cuyperspassage and heads towards ‘new Amsterdam’ in the north, or vice versa. The tableau fades away towards the IJ-river, the lines of the original work gradually dissolving. Then it builds up again in an abstract form from light to dark blue, as if encouraging cyclists to slow down as the ferry comes into view.

You can see more views and read more about the Cuyperspassage on both Arch Daily and Designboom.

tunnel-2

tunnel-3

tunnel-4

tunnel-5

tunnel-6

tunnel-7

tunnel-8

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

Page 2 of 301234...»