Tag Archives: architecture

A “Quick Perspective” on the Scale of the Manmade and Natural Marvels That Surround Us 

aquickperspective_06

If the Willis Tower (1,729 ft) was placed into Russia’s Mir Mine, the tip would only stick out 7 feet past ground level. (All images via Kevin Wisbeth)

College student Kevin Wisbeth, creator of the Youtube series “A Quick Perspective,” puts size in layman’s terms for those who might not be able to conceptualize the true width of a B-2 Bomber’s wings, or understand the immense depth of Russia’s largest mine. Wisbeth digitally composes manmade structures and natural wonders to put into context each of their sizes, seamlessly fitting the world’s largest oil tanker into New York’s Central Park and hovering the M-1 Rocket motor just above a Smart Car.

You can watch the digital presentations of Wisbeth’s comparisons on his Youtube channel. (via Quipsologies)

aquickperspective_01

If the Seawise Giant (1,504 ft), the largest oil tanker ever produced, was placed into the main lake in New York City’s Central Park, it would only have 350 feet of extra room in the front and back of the tanker.

aquickperspective_08

The Burj Khalifa is currently the tallest standing structure in the world (almost measuring 2,722 feet tall). If placed in New York City, it would stretch almost 1,000 feet past the One World Trade center and almost 1,300 feet taller than the Empire State Building.

aquickperspective_02

If the Titanic (882 ft) was placed on the deck of the U.S.S. Ronald Reagan, the ship would have 210 feet of deck room left.

aquickperspective_07

The B-2 Bomber is one of the most advanced and most expensive airplanes in the world. The wingspan of a B-2 is 172 feet, which is 12 feet wider than an NFL football field.

aquickperspective_09

Prehistoric bugs were larger than average day bugs due to the higher oxygen levels. The Pulmonoscorpius kirktonensis was a species of scorpion that grew to 24 inches long, or the size of a normal house cat.

aquickperspective_03

The M-1 Rocket motor was designed back in the 1950s for the NASA space program and would have been the biggest motor ever built had it been constructed. It’s designed diameter was 14 feet, or wide enough to fully cover a Smart Car with 2 feet to spare on either side.

aquickperspective_05

The Death Star’s estimated width is around 99 miles across, or around 1/4th the length of Florida.

See related posts on Colossal about , .

A Contemporary Art Center in Prague Builds 138-Foot Rooftop Airship as a Home for Public Events 

airship-1

(AP Photo/Petr David Josek) All images licensed for use on Colossal.

An enormous object resembling a zeppelin has just been built atop the Dox Center for Contemporary Art in Prague. The 138-foot structure (42-meter) won’t be taking to the sky anytime soon, but will instead be utilized as a public gathering space for readings, performances, and debates about literature. The wooden airship-like building is situated atop a cascade of steps on the Dox center’s roof and should accommodate up to 120 seated visitors.

The alternative meeting space was designed as part of a collaboration between the center’s founder and director, Leos Valka, and architect Martin Rajnis who won the 2014 Global Award for Sustainable Architecture. “Our aim for the world of contemporary art is to spread and get partially interconnected with the world of literature,” Valka shared with the AP at a preview event this week. “It’s a world of pure imagination, a children’s world.” Rajnis recently gave a Creative Mornings talk in Prague titled Embrace the Weird.

The airship has officially been named Gulliver, after the fictional protagonist and narrator of Jonathan Swift’s famous Gulliver’s Travels. You can see more process photos on Pinterest, Google Photos, and on Facebook.

airship-2

(AP Photo/Petr David Josek)

airship-3

(AP Photo/Petr David Josek)

airship-4

(AP Photo/Petr David Josek)

airship-5

(AP Photo/Petr David Josek)

airship-6

Photo courtesy HAMR Huť architektury Martin Rajniš.

airship-7

Photo courtesy HAMR Huť architektury Martin Rajniš.

airship-10

Photo courtesy HAMR Huť architektury Martin Rajniš.

airship-8

Photo courtesy HAMR Huť architektury Martin Rajniš.

airship-9

Photo by Matej Slávik / HN

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

A Museum Dedicated to Miniature Architectural Models Opens in Tokyo 

ARCHI-DEPOT_09

Earlier this summer, Archi-Depot opened within Tokyo’s Shinagawa district, a warehouse museum dedicated to the storage and display of Japanese architectural models. Created by the company Warehouse TERRADA (previously), the cavernous space houses rows and rows of dramatically-lit miniature designs, many of which serve as the tiny precursors to some of the city’s top attractions such as the Tokyo Skytree, Tokyo International Airport, and the Asakusa Culture and Tourism Center.

Each of the models stacked within the museum’s 17-foot-tall interior contain a QR code, a feature that provides quick access to further information about the architectural works. Digital details include blueprints, photographs of the finalized building or structure, and examples of other projects the head architect has completed during their career. One architect in particular, Kengo Kuma, has been selected to design the 2020 World Olympics stadium. Although this project is still within its planning stages, a few of his completed projects’ models are stored within the museum. These works include the China Academy of Arts’ Folk Art Museum and the Asakusa cultural center mentioned above. Other architects included in the museum’s collection are Jun Aoki, Shigeru Ban, Wonderwall, Torafu, and many more as the collection is continuously expanding.

In addition to this growing permanent display, Archi-Depot also hosts rotating exhibitions of newer models or more conceptual pieces in its exhibition area. Currently the museum has an exhibition of works by Japanese architecture firm Wonderwall that will be on display through the end of the year. Last month we had a chance to visit the museum, and were blown away by the immense detail put into each of the tiny pieces, especially considering they are often stored away from the public eye. You can have a chance to browse the collection by either visiting the museum Tuesday through Sunday from 11 AM to 9 PM, or visit digitally on their website and Instagram.

ARCHI-DEPOT_03   ARCHI-DEPOT_05

ARCHI-DEPOT_01

ARCHI-DEPOT_04  ARCHI-DEPOT_02

ARCHI-DEPOT_12

ARCHI-DEPOT_06

ARCHI-DEPOT_07

ARCHI-DEPOT_08

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

A Bird’s Nest Tearoom Perched Atop a 300-Year-Old Camphor Tree in Japan 

birdsnest-11

All photos by Koji Fujii for Hiroshi Nakamura & NAP

Architect Hiroshi Nakamura had always been intrigued by how some crows utilize found coat hangers as a structural element in their nests. With this idea in mind, a unique opportunity presented itself when treehouse builder Takashi Kobayashi contacted him with an unusual site for a tearoom: 10 meters above the ground in a 300-year-old cinnamomum camphora tree growing precariously on the side of a mountain that overlooks the ocean in Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan. Using the coat hangers as a starting point he designed the Bird’s Nest Atami Tearoom using a variety of minimally invasive construction techniques meant to protect the integrity of the tree.

“Hangers are not only durable but also highly elastic, and they offer more hooks to connect than branches and hence are easier to assemble,” he shares. “Crows, flying deftly across the dichotomy of natural and artificial, are creating a functional and comfortable environment.” Thus the tearoom became a lightweight scaffold-type structure that works in harmony with the trees branches instead of being directly anchored to it. From Nakamura’s notes on the project:

For the foundation, we carefully inserted pier type foundations between the roots in order to avoid the use of concrete and large-scale excavation. Using the structure itself as scaffolding, we assembled it by avoiding the branches as birds create their nest, adding or taking out components based on structural analysis. We mortared the room interior to be like a swallow’s nest. The design leaves open the possibility for visitors to experience nest building by picking up branches from the mountain side and fitting them into walls inside.

The tearoom is part of the KAI Atami resort, and you can see more views both inside and out on the Hiroshi Nakamura & NAP website. Please take me with you. (via ARCHatlas)

birdsnest-1

birdsnest-2

birdsnest-3

birdsnest-5

birdsnest-6

birdsnest-7

birdsnest-8

birdsnest-9

birdsnest-10

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

Levitating Clouds Provide a Dreamlike Resting Place During the Festival des Architectures Vives 

HeadintheClouds_06

Images by Paul Kozlowski

The Festival des Arcitectures Vives in Montpellier, France grants access to the courtyards of private hotels and other buildings typically restricted to the general public, filling these outdoor areas with installations that reflect the architecture that surrounds the temporary artworks. For the 2016 festival, the French collaborative duo Michaël Martins Afonso and Caroline Escaffre-Faure brought architecture’s universal backdrop down to eye level, floating several large clouds throughout one of the selected courtyards.

The project, which they have titled “Head in the Clouds,” provides a relaxing dreamland away from the bustling city, inviting attendees to sit or stand within the fluffy orbs. Although the symbolism of the piece is direct, the installation does provide a meditative area for those to take a step back and think, dream, or scheme amongst the hovering works.

You can see more images from this installation and the rest of the festival on the Festival des Architectures Vives’ Instagram. (via Designboom)

HeadintheClouds_02

HeadintheClouds_05

HeadintheClouds_08

HeadintheClouds_01

HeadintheClouds_04 HeadintheClouds_03

HeadintheClouds_07

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

New Miniature Dwellings Suspended Inside Test Tubes by Rosa de Jong 

micro-1

Artist Rosa de Jong continues to explore the spacious confines of glass test tubes by erecting impossibly small buildings, trees, and other inhabitable structures inside of them. For her series titled Micro Matter the Amsterdam-based artist uses traditional model-making materials and her own handcrafted structures that she suspends inside scientific instruments. You can see some of her latest sculptures on Behance, and she may eventually start selling some of her pieces online, so be sure to signup for an alert.

micro-2

micro-3

micro-4

micro-8

micro-5

micro-6

micro-7

micro-last

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Page 2 of 311234...»