architecture

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Photography

Plush Seats and Ornate Balconies Sit Empty in Joanna Vestey's Unobstructed Photographs of London Theaters

July 6, 2020

Grace Ebert

Charlie Jones, Building Services Manager, Royal Albert Hall in London, June 2020. Image © Joanna Vestey, shared with permission

In Joanna Vestey’s Custodians for COVID series, one worker poses idly amid an otherwise unobstructed shot of a historic venue. The Oxford-based photographer has been capturing the empty seats and balconies of London theaters, which have been closed due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. For the timely series, Vestey visited 20 venues, including Royal Albert Hall, The Globe, and National Theatre, to photograph the breadth of the vacant architecture.

Prints of the bare spaces are available on Vestey’s site, with proceeds supporting each company. She also shares many of her architectural projects on Instagram.

 

Deborah McGhee, Head of Building Operations, The Globe, June 2020. Image © Joanna Vestey, shared with permission

Greg Ripley-Duggan, Executive Producer, Hampstead Theatre in London, June 2020. Image © Joanna Vestey, shared with permission

Graeme Bright, Building and Facilities Manager, Theatre Royal Stratford East in London, June 2020. Image © Joanna Vestey, shared with permission

Louise Glover, Theatre Manager, Alexandra Palace Theatre in London, June 2020. Image © Joanna Vestey, shared with permission

Gerhard Maritz, Keyholder, Bush Theatre in London, June 2020. Image © Joanna Vestey, shared with permission

Kieron Lillis, Head of Facilities, National Theatre in London, June 2020. Image © Joanna Vestey, shared with permission

Ruairi McNulty, Technical Manager, Richmond Theatr in London, June 2020. Image © Joanna Vestey, shared with permission

 

 



Design

Two Recycled Woods are Engineered into a Modest, Airy Church in Indonesia

June 10, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © TSDS, by Mario Wibowo

Constructed entirely with locally sourced wood waste, “Oikumene Church” erected in Sajau, East Kalimantan, Indonesia, is designed to conform to its natural environment. The unassuming project features a slatted facade made of Rimba, or teak, while the inner structure utilizes meranti. An open-air hallway wraps around the perimeter of the building that’s situated at the highest elevation in the region.

For the worship space, TSDS Interior Architects relied on the Dayak people’s “Rumah Betang” design concept, which is an elongated, single-room dwelling that must have entryways on the east and west sides. Varying roof heights improve airflow throughout the interior, allowing it to stay cool throughout the day when temperatures hover around 90 degrees Fahrenheit with more than 85 percent humidity.

See more of TSDS’s environmentally thoughtful architecture on Instagram. (via designboom)

 

 

 



Design

Mid-Century Modern Perches Offer a Minimalist Haven for Backyard Birds

May 15, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Douglas Bernhard

Accented with wood-slatted porches and bright water dishes, these mid-century modern birdhouses by Douglas Barnhard give avian neighbors with particular aesthetic sensibilities a reason to flock home. Barnhard, who’s behind the Santa Cruz-based company Sourgrassbuilt, builds the succulent-studded abodes from bamboo, cedar, teak, and glossy laminate. With clean lines and angular features, they emulate the architecture pioneered by Joseph Eichler, Frank Lloyd Wright, and the Bauhaus.

To offer your feathered companions a modern upgrade, see which works Barnhard has available on Etsy, and check out the home he renovated into a miniature art gallery on Instagram. (via Apartment Therapy)

 

 

 



Design

Corrugated Steel Shelves Line a Church-Turned-Poetry-Shop in Shanghai

May 12, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Wutopia Lab

Peer inside Shanghai’s St. Nicholas, an Orthodox church from 1932, and you won’t see pews or traditional iconography. Thanks to architectural firm Wutopia Lab, the renovated building now serves as a shrine to verse. Titled “Church in Church,” the 388 square-meter structure holds Sinan Books Poetry Store, which boasts more than 1,000 volumes written in multiple languages. They’re displayed on steel shelves weighing 45 tons that contrast the ornate facades, high archways, and ceiling-bound frescoes of the original architecture.

In a conversation with ArchDaily, Wutopia Lab said the Chinese city’s mandates to preserve historical features restricted the project. The result is a light-filled space for Shanghai’s poetry community.

It should have an independent spirituality and should not be based on the religion of the old site. Given the fact that the dome could not be transformed, I used bookshelf to create a new structure as a Church in the old building Church. This is ‘Church in Church,’ a sanctuary for modern people was born in where once a sanctuary of faith.

For shoppers who need a snack after browsing, there are two cafes on the east and west sides of the building. For more of Wutopia Lab’s poetic designs, head to Instagram. You also might like these similarly transformed bookstores in the Netherlands and Buenos Aires. (via Trendland)

 

 

 



Design

Rippling Waves of Bricks Formed Through Groundbreaking New Augmented Bricklaying Technique

April 28, 2020

Grace Ebert

Image © Michael Lyrenmann. All images shared with permission

The teams at Gramazio Kohler Research and Incon.Ai recently collaborated on an architectural project that merges digital savvy with traditional craftsmanship to create a skillful new building technique. Completed in 2019, “Augmented Bricklaying” relies on digital markers to instruct bricklayers about where to spread mortar, how thick to layer it, and what the position of the next stone should be.

A custom-designed guidance system, the hybrid technique combats the limitations of both traditional and innovative digital approaches: robotic arms have restricted mobility and difficulty with pliable materials like mortar, while physical templates can be cumbersome and less accurate for masons. The new model “combines the advantages of computational design with the dexterity of humans, supporting an entirely new way of fabrication,” the Zurich-based team said in a statement.

To create the 225 square-meter structure, masons assembled 13,596 locally sourced bricks in varying rows. The differentiated mortar heights range from five to 30 millimeters and help to determine each brick’s rotation that spans -20° to +20°. “That way mortar, usually treated as secondary material in the design of fair-faced brick walls, became a defining element in the appearance of the facade,” the team said.

Because of the differed construction, the porous exterior appears as a wave or ripple. The patterned facade provides ventilation and allows sunlight to stream into the building, which produces an array of circles that shifts based on the time of day.  It will house KITRVS Winery’s processing and storage facility. The Greek vineyard overlooks the Thermaic Gulf of the Aegean Sea at the base of Mount Olympus.

Gramazio Kohler Research is the ETH Zurich’s chair of architecture and digital fabrication, and Incon.Ai is a subsidiary of the organization’s robotic systems labs. Keep up with Gramazio Kohler’s inventive projects on Instagram and Vimeo. (via designboom)

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Image © Michael Lyrenmann

Image © Michael Lyrenmann

Image © Michael Lyrenmann

Image © Michael Lyrenmann

Image © Michael Lyrenmann

Image © Michael Lyrenmann

Image © Michael Lyrenmann

Image © Michael Lyrenmann

Image © Gramazio Kohler Research, ETH Zurich

Image © Gramazio Kohler Research, ETH Zurich

 

 



Design

Bright Tape Promoting Social Distancing Transforms Public Architecture in Singapore

April 21, 2020

Grace Ebert

To help visualize social distancing guidelines, residents in Singapore are using tape to demarcate many outdoor common areas and shopping centers. Large dots designate where to stand when waiting to check out, and benches and steps feature rectangles identifying open seats. An unintended side effect of these safety measures, though, is that the tape itself becomes an architectural element. The account @tape_measures has been compiling photo submissions from the country, showing how geometric additions are altering public spaces with the use of simple X’s and more complex systems of arrows, boxes, and lines. For more of the architectural transformations inspired by social distancing, head to Instagram. (via Kottke)

 

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