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Design History

A Glass Floor in a New Dublin Grocery Opens a Window to Medieval Viking History

October 23, 2020

Grace Ebert

Embedded in the architecture of a new Lidl store in Dublin is a glass floor that allows shoppers to peer down into medieval history. During the supermarket’s construction, archaeologists discovered a 1,000-year-old home of Hiberno-Norse Dubliners, who were ancestors to the Vikings, in addition to a 13th-century wine jug and the below-stage trap of the former Aungier Street Theatre. Rather than excavate the items and build on top of the site, covering the ruins, the store installed glass flooring that provides shoppers with a literal window into local history. (via Twisted Sifter)

 

 

 



Design Photography

A New Book Compiles Photos of Idiosyncratic, Quirky Destinations that Look Just Like Wes Anderson Films

October 21, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Wally Koval, shared with permission

Devotees of Wes Anderson’s films can spot the pastel architecture and simple signage synonymous with the American director’s aesthetic anywhere, a notion that’s proven in a newly released book by Wally Koval. Buoyed by an Instagram account with more than 1,200 images from all seven continents, Accidentally Wes Anderson showcases international destinations with the likeness of the Grand Budapest Hotel or the heavily wallpapered train cars of The Darjeeling Limited. The 368-page edition is teeming with charm, quirky compositions, and picturesque settings and even includes a foreword written by the famed director himself, who previously had no ties to the endeavor.

Based in Brooklyn, Koval began collecting photographs in 2017 and has since amassed an incredible archive, which he’s categorized by location, theme, and color palette on his site. Further explore the idiosyncratic locales by picking up a copy of Accidentally Wes Anderson on Bookshop. (via Fast Company)

 

 

 



Design

Townscaper: Build Your Worries Away With This Instantly Gratifying Island City Construction Game

October 16, 2020

Grace Ebert

Earlier this year, Malmo, Sweden-based game developer Oskar Stålberg launched Townscaper, a low-stakes video game that’s similar to Sim City without the threat of natural disaster or the need to maintain characters’ emotional wellbeing. Users only have the option to delete or build with a certain color, a function that’s controlled entirely by the algorithm. Simply drop a block and watch the system construct charming homes, towering cathedrals, and luxurious greenspaces. “No goal. No real gameplay. Just plenty of building and plenty of beauty. That’s it,” Stålberg writes.

Townscaper is currently available to download for $6, although it isn’t finished quite yet. Watch this comprehensive tutorial to get a better sense of the user experience, and follow Stålberg on Twitter to keep up with the latest developments. (via Jeroen Apers)

 

 

 



Art

Two Fabric Homes by Artist Do Ho Suh Float Above an Atrium in Incheon International Airport

October 13, 2020

Grace Ebert

“Home within Home” (2019), polyester fabric, stainless steel, 292.91 x 325.59 x 316.93 inches. Images © Do Ho Suh, courtesy of Lehmann Maupin, shared with permission

Living and working in London, Korean artist Do Ho Suh (previously) is concerned with “home, physical space, displacement, memory, individuality, and collectivity,” ideas he evokes in his life-sized fabric sculptures and installations. His 2019 piece “Home within Home,” which is suspended from an atrium in Incheon International Airport in Seoul, positions two structures vertically, with the larger polyester and steel construction on top. This newer work evokes a similar piece from 2013, titled “Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home,” which placed replicas of Suh’s former living spaces within one another, from his first house in South Korea to an apartment building in Rhode Island.

Often using his own experiences as source material, Suh’s multi-media practice explores both the physical and metaphorical understandings of home as he considers the ways people occupy structures in specific times, locations, forms, and histories. “The spaces we inhabit also contain psychological energy, and in his work, he makes visible those markers of memories, personal experiences, and a sense of security, regardless of geographic location,” a statement about his practice says.

Suh is represented by Lehmann Maupin, and you can explore more of the artist’s architectural sculptures, installations, and smaller works on the international gallery’s site.

 

“Home within Home” (2019), polyester fabric, stainless steel, 292.91 x 325.59 x 316.93 inches

“Home within Home” (2019), polyester fabric, stainless steel, 292.91 x 325.59 x 316.93 inches

“Home within Home” (2019), polyester fabric, stainless steel, 292.91 x 325.59 x 316.93 inches

“Passage/s” (2017)

“Passage/s” (2017)

 

 



Design

Lively Interventions by 100 Architects Transform Urban Spaces into Vibrant Playgrounds

October 8, 2020

Grace Ebert

“Big Bang” in Pingjiaqiao Road 36, Pudong, Shanghai. All images © 100 Architects, shared with permission

Walk around Shanghai or Dubai, and you might stumble upon a bright, geometric playground amongst the concrete. The design studio 100 Architects installs bold interventions that transform typical urban spaces into colorful playgrounds. Each public structure, which boasts entertainment for both kids and adults, is conceptualized around a theme, whether a massive shower complete with ground-level waves or an illuminated castle with inner tunnels. Splashes of color, playground equipment like swings and slides, and towering structures frame the areas, while some spaces, like the “Sea Horse,” sprinkle water from a central spot.

100 Architects recently partnered with urban planning group Playgones to collaborate on a range of interventions throughout Europe in upcoming months, which you can follow on Instagram. (via Journal du Design)

 

“Creek Play” in Dubai Creek Harbor, Dubai, UAE

“Hang Out” in Pingjiaqiao Road 36, Pudong, Shanghai, China

“Paint Drop” in Daning Road, Jin’An District, Shanghai, China

“Paint Drop” in Daning Road, Jin’An District, Shanghai, China

“Seahorse” in Pingjiaqiao Road 36, Chongqing, China

“The Shower” in Daning Road, Jin’An District, Shanghai, China

“The Shower” in Daning Road, Jin’An District, Shanghai, China

“The Shower” in Daning Road, Jin’An District, Shanghai, China

“Secret Garden”

“Secret Garden”

 

 



Design

Built From Rattan, A Sinuous Structure Houses a Yoga Sanctuary in Bangkok

September 28, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Enter Asia Projects

To transform a 450-square-meter space into serene pods for yoga, Thai architecture studio Enter Projects Asia built an undulating structure of rattan. Harvested from the palms of Southeast Asia, the natural material lines the walls and encloses the overhead lighting before swooping down to form a lengthy bench. The result is a serene, light-filled area that flows from ceiling to floor, mimicking the gentle movements of yoga poses.

Thai timber bears the structure’s load, while the rattan separates two large studios and two smaller, private rooms. The sanctuaries were designed for yoga brand Vikasa‘s retreats. “All elements of the project were made from natural, local materials to be a hub or a portal for their existing location, which is based on a hillside in Koh Samui: Thai hardwood, local black slate, bamboo and most notably, rattan,” Patrick Keane, design director for the Enter Projects Asai, told Dezeen.

The architecture studio collaborated with designer Project Rattan to combine classic weaving and 3D techniques, and local craftspeople used digitally created templates and frames to inform their construction process. A glass facade holds the rattan forms, which occupy the second floor of the building, with Vikasa’s cafe on the street level. It’s “an oasis of tranquillity amongst the chaos of Bangkok,” Keane says.

To follow Enter Projects Asia’s latest architectural endeavors, follow Keane on Instagram.