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Art

Miniature Architectural Interiors and Collections of Tiny Symbolic Objects Carved into White Stone

December 14, 2018

Anna Marks

Elevation VI Rooke Chapel

Elevation VI Rooke Chapel

Copenhagen-based artist Matthew Simmonds (previously) carves miniature architectural interiors, angular shapes, and tiny windows filled with symbolic objects, trinkets, and animals. His ghostly white sculptural forms are cut from and presented within raw stone, which allows for a striking contrast between his designs and the medium’s natural surface. 

Although Simmonds mainly focuses on sacred architecture, particularly from the Medieval era, he is drawn to how cultures overlap and influence each other. His work often references a variety of architectural styles in one piece, and sometimes presents abstract forms. “I get inspired by real architectural spaces, but the works are not reproductions of actual buildings in miniature, with the exception of the Elevation series,” Simmonds tells Colossal.

His sculptures take a minimum of three weeks to complete, however they can span several months depending on the complexity and size. “The longest I’ve ever worked on a single piece of stone was when I made Windows in 2017,” explains Simmonds. “There was around 180 days, or nine months, of carving time with more time spent on research and design.” 

This particular piece was one of his most complex to date. Rows of carved openings collectively served as a curio cabinet, with each window filled with a range of creations, from a miniature iguana and array of small fruits to even tinier models of buildings and structures. Here Simmonds showcases the world in miniature, seen through the visual symbols of a variety of cultures. In the piece are also several references to San Francisco, as it was specifically created for a show in the Bay Area. To view more of the artist’s recent stone carvings, visit his website.

Windows 2017

Windows 2017

Windows 2017

Windows 2017

Windows 2017

Muqarnas Study

Muqarnas Study

Muqarnas Study

Exedra

Fragment VIII

Cube

Cube

Windows 2017

Millennium

Elevation VI Rooke Chapel

Elevation VIII Mren Cathedral

 

 



Illustration

Infinite Cities Take Shape in Imagined Architectural Drawings by JaeCheol Park

December 4, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

JaeCheol Park, who goes by the artist name PaperBlue, creates intricate drawings in the style of architectural drafts. But rather than imagining a buildable building, Park employs the classic illustrative aesthetic to form fantastical urban environments where structures appear and disappear, bleeding into one another in a haze of geometric patterns. His loose linework and intensive layering enliven the historical architectural styles he highlights in his drawings. The artist, who is based in Seongnam, South Korea, has a broad audience for his digital and concept art along with his more traditional drafting-inspired work. Park shares drawing tutorials on Youtube and finished work on Facebook. He has also published a book, which is available on Amazon. (via ARCHatlas)

 

 



Art Craft Illustration

Intricate Landscapes and Tiny Houses ‘Painted’ With Multi-Colored Thread

December 3, 2018

Andrew LaSane

Utah-based artist Stephanie K. Clark (previously) considers herself a painter, but the works she creates are not made with a traditional painterly medium. Using embroidery techniques and strands of floss in a spectrum of colors, Clark paints little houses, landscapes, and other scenes that look as if they exist in the natural world and are being lit by the moon or sun.

“My process is much like any painter,” Stephanie tells Colossal. “I started out as a drawer/painter and I’ve just carried that same process into my embroidery work. I always use image and color references for my pieces. I lay out my pallet of thread/floss and I start laying the colors as if I’m painting. They eventually start blending themselves.”

Working at various scales (as small as 5″ x 5″, and as large as 6-foot-wide canvases), Clark says that the time invested depends on the size and detail of the piece, with small houses taking between 6 to 12 hours to complete, and larger landscapes requiring up to 20 hours. “I consider myself a fast worker for embroidery,” she explained, “which tends to be slow and tedious. Sometimes I have to remind myself to slow down and when I do, the pieces come out so much prettier.”

When not working on commissions, Clark’s thread paintings are inspired by her personal life: “My concepts typically go along with my life, my family, my home, and my heart.” To see more of her work, follow her on Instagram.

 

 



Design

A System of Root-Like Benches Spreads Organically Through a South Korean Public Park

November 26, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Root Bench is a multi-height bench system installed in Hangang Park in Seoul, South Korea. The design is a winning proposal by Yong Ju Lee, which creates a circular protrusion of roots that provides space for rest and relaxation. The nearly 100-foot diameter installation is formed from conjoined slats of wood attached to a metal frame, and sprawls from a centralized point in the park. Three different heights accommodate children’s seating, adult chairs, and tables for picnicking. This provides space for all sizes, and allows gatherings that vary from intimate to community-wide celebrations. (via Designboom)

 

 



Design

A 10-Ton Copper Staircase Designed by CEBRA Floats Above Copenhagen’s Redesigned Experimentarium Museum

November 23, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All images © CEBRA and photographer Adam Mørk

A twisting set of floating copper staircases intertwine at the main entrance of Copenhagen’s new science and technology center, the Experimentarium. The museum, and its four-story Helix staircases, were designed by Danish architecture studio CEBRA who wanted to create a subtle nod to the institution’s science-based curriculum. The design is an abstract version of a DNA strand’s composition at an extraordinary scale. At over 300 feet long, the staircase includes 20,000 pounds of copper and 320,000 pounds of steel.

CEBRA won an international architecture competition to design the building in 2011. In addition to doubling the exhibition space of the Experimentarium’s original building, the re-design also includes a roof terrace, new staff facilities overlooking the museum, and convention center, and a large cafe and picnic area. You can see more images of the build-out, and CEBRA’s designs on their website and Instagram. (via ArchDaily)

 

 



Design

A Green-Tinted Aluminum Canopy Inspired by Florida’s Mangrove Trees

November 15, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Form of Wander is a new project by Mark Fornes of THEVERYMANY studio (previously) which was recently installed on a pier above the Hillsborough River in Tampa, Florida. The winding aluminum structure was built to subtly imitate the form of the native mangrove, and extends the city’s Riverfront Park recreational space onto the waterway. Its shape encourages playful wandering through the seven trunks secured along the floating bridge, and its branches imitate the mangrove’s tangled roots. Despite the thickness of the green-tinted structure being just a few millimeters, the canopy was built to withstand hurricane force winds. It held up to its first major storm this October when Hurricane Michael traveled through Florida’s Gulf Coast. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Design

An Undulating Brick Facade Imitates the Free-Flowing Movement of Draped Fabric

October 17, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

German architecture firm Behet Bondzio Lin Architekten recently constructed a new headquarters for the Association of the Northwest German Textile and Garment Industry in Münster, Germany. The firm wanted the building to allude to the association’s work with fabric, and designed a facade that would imitate its folds through a gradient of bricks oriented at different angles.

The decision to recreate the appearance of a soft textile from a firm material was inspired by the alabaster folds of Max Klinger's statue of Beethoven located at the Leipzig Art Museum. The carved composer sits shirtless on an armchair with what appears to be a piece of fabric draped over his knee. The fluid nature of the sculpture’s scarf is believable, despite its composition of solid stone. A similar experience is shared by the new headquarters, however created from bricks rather than rock. You can see more of the Behet Bondzio Lin’s designs on their website. (via Jeroen Apers)