architecture

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Design

An Undulating Brick Facade Imitates the Free-Flowing Movement of Draped Fabric

October 17, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

German architecture firm Behet Bondzio Lin Architekten recently constructed a new headquarters for the Association of the Northwest German Textile and Garment Industry in Münster, Germany. The firm wanted the building to allude to the association’s work with fabric, and designed a facade that would imitate its folds through a gradient of bricks oriented at different angles.

The decision to recreate the appearance of a soft textile from a firm material was inspired by the alabaster folds of Max Klinger's statue of Beethoven located at the Leipzig Art Museum. The carved composer sits shirtless on an armchair with what appears to be a piece of fabric draped over his knee. The fluid nature of the sculpture’s scarf is believable, despite its composition of solid stone. A similar experience is shared by the new headquarters, however created from bricks rather than rock. You can see more of the Behet Bondzio Lin’s designs on their website. (via Jeroen Apers)

 

 



Design Photography

Majestic Conservatories and Cozy Private Potting Sheds Showcase the Universal Appeal of Glass Greenhouses

October 16, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Gardens by the Bay, Singapore. All photographs © Haarkon

Photographer duo India Hobson and Magnus Edmondson (known collectively as Haarkon) celebrate the universal beauty and rich history of glass greenhouses in a new book, Glasshouse Greenhouse. Filled with verdant images of greenhouses from around the world, the book is divided into seven thematic chapters including History, Research, and Pleasure. Haarkon complement the visual storytelling with written reflections that explain each location and their experience in discovering it.

The UK-based pair travels widely for their editorial and commercial work as visual storytellers, and seeking out greenhouses has become a touchpoint in their explorations of new places. In an interview with the Telegraph, Hobson shares, “It’s a fusion of both botanicals and architecture, an odd but extremely satisfying mix of the organic and engineered which I think appeals to a broad range of [people]. To me, they are a universal language in some ways: the fusion of many cultures and countries all under one beautiful glass roof.”

Freshly published by Pavilion Books on October 4th, Glasshouse Greenhouse is Haarkon’s debut book and it is available on Amazon. You can see more from Hobson and Edmondson on their website and Instagram.

Tropical Display Dome, Brisbane Botanic Garden, Mount Coot-tha, Queensland, Australia

The Kibble Palace, Glasgow Botanic Gardens, Glasgow UK

University of Oxford Botanic Garden, Oxford UK

Barbican Conservatory, London UK

Gardens by the Bay, Singapore

Magnus Edmondson and India Hobson

 

 



Art Design

A Prickly Structure Made of 70,000 Reusable Hexapod Particles

October 3, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All images used with permission. Photo © Roland Halbe

Architects design structures to last for generations. They erect buildings that will become classic additions to the skyline and last for generations due to solid foundations unsusceptible to catastrophic disaster. Researchers at the Institute for Computational Design and Construction (ICD) at the University of Stuttgart have taken a different approach in their recent 2018 Aggregate Pavilion, a moveable structure composed of thousands reusable star-shaped parts.

For the last ten years, researchers at ICD have studied how the behavior of granular substances, such as sand or gravel, can be adapted into an inhabitable structure. Their pavilion is the latest result from this research, and the first fully enclosed architectural space that has been entirely constructed from elements which hold their position by loose frictional contact. This allows the piece to act as a solid material while also maintaining the properties of a shape-shifting fluid.

For construction, 70,000 recycled plastic particles were poured by a robotic system into an enclosed space of about 29 x 32 feet. Included in the pour were also dozens of inflatable balloon-like objects, which fill the structure’s negative space until they are removed. These rubber spheres are used by the designers to roughly construct the inner form of the pavilion, creating hollow areas where the surrounding decapod particles will not topple inwards. You can take a look behind the making of ICD’s granular structure in the video below, and see more projects by the institute on their website. (via Archdaily)

Photo © Roland Halbe

Photo © Roland Halbe

Photo © Roland Halbe

Photo © ICD University of Stuttgart

Photo © Roland Halbe

Photo © Roland Halbe

ICD Aggregate Pavilion 2018 from ICD on Vimeo.

 

 



Design Food

A Cafe in Seoul Uses Clever Contour Lines to Appear Like a 2-Dimensional Cartoon

September 27, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Photo by @bulaiern

Since 2017, a small cafe in South Korea has been transporting its visitors to a two-dimensional world. Cafe Yeonnam-dong 239-20 in Seoul features all-white walls, floors, furniture, and fixtures accented with black contour lines that give the space the flattened look of a cartoon drawing. Illustration-inspired elements include drawn cacti, a curious puppy, and blank picture frames. Some of the beverage containers even sport defining lines. You can take a peek inside the playful cafe on Instagram and Facebook. (via My Modern Met)

Photo by @benjamin_liang

Photo by @cg__shinwonho

Photo by @__elsalovetravel__

Photo by @tsaichialing_kelly

Photo by @mmarichell

Photo by d7my_uk_

Photo by @adayinthelalz

 

 



Art Design

A Porous White Aluminum Sculpture Encourages Exploration and Play at the Jinji Lake Biennale

September 27, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All images by NAARO

For the 2018 Jinji Lake Biennale in Suzhou, China, Marc Fornes and his art and architecture studio THEVERYMANY (previously here and here) installed a porous outdoor pavilion crafted from white aluminum. Holes that span the bulbous structure allow light to pour in from each direction, sprinkling the interior with a variegated influx of miniature light beams. The piece is titled Boolean Operator after the search function that determines relationships between statements, concepts, or forms. Its experience is detailed in a statement on THEVERYMANY’s website:

The intricacy of the skin asserts a density: of limbs, of openings, of parts and their connections. You have to let your eyes adjust to the resolution of the experience. Unfocusing your gaze again, the whole scene overwhelms, strikes awe, compels you to move closer, deeper, and through an edgeless space. The doubly-curved surfaces cast no regular shadows, giving little information to the eye to perceive its scale or depth.

The winding nature of the installation encourages play, as the curvature of the outside walls turn inward to form the interior, and vice versa. You can see more projects by the New York City-based studio on their Instagram. (via NOTCOT)

 

 



Art Design

ReActor: a Tilting House That Shifts and Spins Based on its Inhabitants’ Movements

September 20, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Photography: Richard Barnes & Dora Somosi

In the rolling hills of upstate New York at the outdoor sculpture park Art Omi, artist duo Alex Schweder and Ward Shelley (previously) created a fully functional house with a special slant. The project, called ReActor, is a 42 by 8-foot rotating home that balances on a single 14-foot tall concrete column. Movements inside the dwelling, as well as outside forces like gusts of wind, cause the structure to gently tilt and rotate. In the summer of 2016, Schweder and Shelley inhabited the home for five days, and their movements toward or away from the house’s fulcrum caused constant motion. Because the home is constructed with Philip Johnson-esque levels of floor-to-ceiling windows, the artists’ interior activities were visible to Omi attendees.

Schweder and Shelley have collaborated since 2007, focusing on “performance architecture,” a practice of designing, building, and living in structures for the purpose of public observation and dialogue.  Though the artists are currently residing in (presumably) more stable housing, the tilting house remained on view at Omi until August 2018. (via Yellowtrace)

 

 



Art

Flipped Perspectives Explored in New Intimate Paintings by Cinta Vidal

September 12, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"On Chairs," Acrylic on wood, 32 x 32 cm

“On Chairs,” Acrylic on wood, 32 x 32 cm

Barcelona-based artist Cinta Vidal has previously produced fictionalized architectural paintings that study how individuals with differing perspectives can view and inhabit the same world. Vidal crafts her visual metaphors by placing subjects onto floating islands, presenting each with a different vantage point depending on their chosen location. In her newer series of works, Vidal focuses more intently on intimate relationships, populating her suspended clusters of furniture, animals, and household objects with only two or three individuals rather than a larger population.

Her Couples series places pairs of characters in opposition to each other, exaggerating her previous explorations of human understanding. In these works two male figures sit back-to-back as they type on their own laptops, a woman peers longingly from an armchair as a man stands facing the opposite direction below her chair, and a boy photographer and woman stare at the same scene, but from flipped perspectives. These works show how two people might hold differing ideals, despite occupying the same community or household.

The included paintings will be presented alongside a mural in Vidal’s upcoming solo exhibition Viewpoints at Thinkspace Projects in Los Angeles from September 15 through October 6, 2018. You can view more of the artist’s gravity-defying works on her website and Instagram.

"Outing," Oil on wood panel, 55 x 55 cm

“Outing,” Oil on wood panel, 55 x 55 cm

"Working," Acrylic on wood, 20 x 32 cm

“Working,” Acrylic on wood, 20 x 32 cm

"Couple 4," Acrylic on wood, 13.4 x 32 cm (L) and "Couple 3," Acrylic on wood, 13.6 x 32 cm (R)

“Couple 4,” Acrylic on wood, 13.4 x 32 cm (L) and “Couple 3,” Acrylic on wood, 13.6 x 32 cm (R)

"Four Cats Three Kids," Acrylic on wood, 35 x 50 cm

“Four Cats Three Kids,” Acrylic on wood, 35 x 50 cm

"Living Together," Acrylic on wood, 63.5 x 50 cm

“Living Together,” Acrylic on wood, 63.5 x 50 cm

"Couple 2," Acrylic on wood, 11.2 x 32 cm

“Couple 2,” Acrylic on wood, 11.2 x 32 cm

"Coworking," Oil on wood panel, 80 x 80 cm

“Coworking,” Oil on wood panel, 80 x 80 cm

"Caravan," Oil on wood, 36 x 36 cm

“Caravan,” Oil on wood, 36 x 36 cm