Illustration

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Illustration

Fantasies and Fears Surround the Beds of Illustrated Characters by Virginia Mori

February 27, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

We love the illustrations of Italian artist Virginia Mori (previously) who adds a subtle hint of dark humor to her quirky illustrations of young women and men. Recently the artist has been drawing scenes that revolve around the unconscious thoughts that spring to life while in bed. Each illustration presents an improbable or unique vision of a bedroom—from a bed composed of live grass, to another balanced on the tips of four trees. The illustrations seem to peek into her subjects’ dreams, projecting their hidden hopes or fears onto their surroundings as they slumber. You can see more of her work on her website, and keep updated with future exhibitions on Instagram and Facebook.

 

 



Art Illustration

Blue and White Greenhouse Illustrations Appear like Sun-Baked Cyanotypes

February 25, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Portuguese artist Ana Frois uses her background in architecture to draft precise structures she fills with imaginative monochrome plants and miniature gardening accessories. The series, simply titled Greenhouses, is created with white pencil on top of deep blue acrylic on paper. The ghostly forms are reminiscent of a cyanotype or faded architectural sketch, as if the clean-cut floating renderings are memories from another time. You can find more of Frois’s drawings on Instagram, and purchase prints of her work on Etsy.

 

 



Art Illustration

Hybrid Graphite Drawings by Mateo Pizarro Merge Animals and Humans with Unexpected Obstacles

February 21, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Colombian artist Mateo Pizarro (previously) is inspired by contradictions. His graphite drawings combine animals with elements of human creation, merging nature with technological advancements or conflicting scenes. A four-winged goose resembles an airplane propeller while an ostrich walks around with a lightbulb as a replacement for its small head and beak.  “Drawing these fantastical animals I have come to realize that the beasts that do exist are just as surreal [as those imagined]: a giraffe or an armadillo is just as improbable as any winged horse,” Pizarro tells Colossal.

His work is included in a group exhibition of works on paper titled Lenguajes en Papel which runs through March 7, 2019 at El Museo Gallery in Bogotá, and his solo exhibition An Anthology of Catastrophes at Heart Ego Contemporary Art in Monterrey runs through April, 2019. You can see more of Pizarro’s drawings on Instagram and Behance.

  

 

 



Illustration

Shapely Shadows Reimagined as Quirky Illustrations by Vincent Bal

February 19, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

The inspiration for the illustrated works of Belgian filmmaker and illustrator Vincent Bal (previously) comes from the shadows cast by everyday objects and detritus from the world around him. Bits of trash and spare items from his home are reimagined as curvy outlines for a cast of characters that range from a young girl in a rainstorm to DJ in his flow. Other items, like a textured glass, create the perfect sun-spotted water for a backyard pool. Bal is currently in production for a live-action film that incorporates his shadow drawings called Shadowology. You can support the creation of the film on Cinecrowd, and see more of his animations on Instagram. Bal also offers prints of his illustrations on Etsy.

 

 

 



Animation Illustration

1,440 Portraits Emerge from a Single Ink Drawing in a New Animation by Jake Fried

February 9, 2019

Andrew LaSane

In an impressive feat of dedication and patience, artist Jake Fried (previously) spent seven months creating Brain Wave, a hand-drawn animation using only ink and white-out. Fried reworked the same black-and-white drawing 1,440 times, scanning each new iteration into Photoshop and sequencing the drawings to play at 24 frames per second. He then added an original music track that frantically connects the hundreds of drawings into one 60-second video.

Centered both literally and narratively around a single, ever-changing face, the short animation takes the viewer through a wide range of emotions, settings, and themes. Because every frame is a new work of art, the piece as a whole feels like snapshots from a dream that have been remembered, recreated, and reassembled.

Working without an outline or storyboard, Fried explained to Vimeo that each successive drawing dictated what would come next. “There is an inherent logic or rhythm that emerges as I make the work, I have developed an instinct or gut-feeling for when the next frame is ready to be scanned. I can get quite obsessive about the smallest shifts within a fraction of a second.”  The filmmakers’s work will be featured later this month at the Flat Earth Film Festival in Seyðisfjörður, Iceland from February 10-14, 2019 and in a group exhibition at Mills Gallery in Boston from February 23 through April 28, 2019. To see more of Fried’s work online, follow him on Instagram. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

 

 

 



Art Illustration

Flower Petals and Stems Transform into Animals and Insects in Inventive New Arrangements by Raku Inoue

January 23, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Raku Inoue (previously) goes all-white in his latest flower petal compositions. The Montreal-based creative uses flower petals, stems, and leaves to form creatures ranging from owls and tigers to beetles and butterflies in his ongoing Natura series. Inoue takes advantage of the natural curvatures and shapes of his source materials to create lively interpretations of animals. In Inoue’s owl, densely-petaled mums form the bird’s fluffy belly, while the angular outlines of alstroemeria create the exoskeleton and horns of a beetle. By using largely intact plants, the artist heightens the aliveness of his creations, bridging both flora and fauna. You can see more of his work on Instagram and Behance.

 

 



Illustration

The Moon’s Magical Mythology Captured in an Illustrated Book by David Álvarez

January 17, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

In Noche Antigua (Ancient Night) an opossum and a rabbit work together—and against each other—to create and maintain the sun and the moon. The book, written in Spanish and illustrated by Mexico-based artist David Álvarez (previously) is based on elements from ancient myths in several Central American cultures. Álvarez captures a sense of quiet magic with the simplified forms and hushed tones of his illustrations, which seem to glow from the illumination of the moon. You can see more of the artist’s work on Instagram and his Etsy shop, and find a hardcover copy of Noche Antigua on Amazon.