Art Photography

Balanced Gourds and Stacked Loaves Compose Bountiful Still Lifes by ChangKi Chung

July 29, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

All photographs © Chang Ki Chung, shared with artist’s permission

ChangKi Chung composes cairn-like portraits of flowers, fruits, and vegetables that balance the unique shapes and vibrant colors of each natural object. In some images the edible elements are shot whole, while in others artistic slices are created to highlight a variety of internal patterns and shapes. For a recent series, Chung was commissioned by the publication Le Monde to create a new still life each week, showcasing stacks of crusty bread, halved hard boiled eggs, and cubes of blood red beets. The Korean photographer has also recently produced two images for the Château du Rivau as a part of a group exhibition celebrating the 500 year anniversary of Leonardo da Vinci’s death. You can see more of Chung’s photographs on his website and Instagram.

 

 



Art Illustration

Melancholy Creatures Explore Imagined Worlds in Wistful Murals by Hayley Welsh

July 29, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Hayley Welsh’s playful murals pair imaginative creatures with universal messages of uplift and encouragement. Often featuring furry, plump critters that seem to be hybrids of dogs, rabbits, and teddy bears, Welsh’s subjects peer through periscopes atop mechanical fish or aboard paper boats, tug clouds from penny farthing bicycles, and sprout trees as antlers. Occasionally, Basquiat-esque crown motifs appear as well.

In a statement on her website, Welsh’s “ominously soft” work “explores inner voices of self doubt and fear, weaving a poignant narrative into every piece⁠—a message for each person to reflect on in the moment.” The British-born artist lives and works between Perth, Australia and Blackburn, U.K. Explore more of her outdoor and gallery-based artwork on her website and Instagram.

 

 



Art

Wild Creatures Emerge From Thrown Sand in Photographs by Claire Droppert

July 28, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Dolphin

Netherlands-based photographer Claire Droppert (previously) has created a new series of images that depict the silhouettes of animals appearing in clumps of thrown Holland beach sand. Dolphins, snakes, lizards, and other animals in the Sand Creatures II collection defy gravity and float through the air in Droppert’s photographs. The “Gravity Project”  highlights natural elements set in nature but unencumbered by the force that keeps them grounded.

“The Sand Creatures series focuses on nature in an unexpected way,” Droppert writes on her website, adding that the “explosive and at times powdery scenes of the grainy sand being thrown into the air can be taken as a manifesting life form” as images of silkworms, cobras, and dogs appear against the backdrop of the horizon and the hazy sky. The photographer has labeled each animal in the series, but the abstract nature of the images gives the viewer some freedom to determine where the boundaries of their anatomies lie.

Prints of Claire Droppert’s photos from this series and others are available to purchase in various sizes from her online shop. To see more of her finished work and a few behind-the-scenes shots, follow her on Instagram.

Silkworm

Moth

Cobra

Shark

Lizard

Wombat

Dog

 

 



Art

Cinematic Journeys Illustrated in Hand Painted Maps by Andrew DeGraff

July 27, 2019

Andrew LaSane

The Wizard of Oz

Maine-based artist, illustrator, and pop culture cartographer Andrew DeGraff creates detailed maps that outline the movements of major characters in iconic movies. Made by hand using gouache and ink on paper, each of DeGraff’s maps are meticulously planned and can take up to 1,000 hours to complete.

DeGraff has been working as an illustrator for 15 years. He began his “Cinemaps” series in 2011 and has since published a book that includes art inspired by Back to the FutureKing KongThe Shining, Pulp Fiction, and other classic movies. Speaking to Colossal about his process, DeGraff said that it doesn’t matter if the film is a favorite that he has seen several times, or if it is one that he is less familiar with—the approach is the same. While carefully watching the movie a few more times, he deconstructs each scene and character journey (which are color-coded in the maps) to create a flowchart. “Then I start building my reference file from film stills, behind the scenes shots of the sets, location shots, Google Earth—even LEGO recreations if [they’re] helpful,” he explains. He then creates a blocking sketch before going in with pencils and paint.

“The smallest ones are 50–80 hours, and the largest go up to 600–1,000 hrs,” DeGraff said. “It’s often tedious but meditative work and I’ve come to love it. And I get to listen to a lot of audiobooks and music while I work since I don’t have to fully concentrate while I spend a day painting 800 trees or something.” To see more of DeGraff’s attention to detail in painted trees and movie landmarks, follow him on Instagram.

Guardians of the Galaxy

Monty Python and the Holy Grail (with key)

The Shining

The Lord of the Rings

Fargo

Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom

The Silence of the Lambs

Mad Max: Fury Road

Mad Max: Fury Road (detail)

Labyrinth

 

 



Art

Ghostly Figures Occupy Sculptures of Architectural Ruin by Diana Al-Hadid

July 26, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

“Nolli’s Orders” (2012), Steel, polymer gypsum, fiberglass, wood, foam, paint, 156 x 264 x 228 inches, all images via Marianne Boesky Gallery

Diana Al-Hadid creates large-scale sculptures and installations that merge bodily forms with collapsing altars, columns, and other architectural forms. Headless bronze figures in repose appear to drip down concrete blocks, while organs surround fictional players like beautiful beasts. In each, the Syran-American artist references archaeological remains, creating ghostly figures that reference the ruins from societies past. In addition to traditional sculptural media like bronze, steel, and concrete, the artist also incorporates more experimental materials like beeswax, fiberglass, and foam. “For me to get a sculpture to lift off the floor…that’s the first way to rebel,” Al-Hadid explained about her gravity-defying work in an Art21 interview.

The Brooklyn-based artist has concurrent Nashville-based exhibitions at both the Frist Art Museum until September 2, 2019 and Cheekwood Estate&Gardens. You can see more of Al-Hadid’s sculptural work on her website and Instagram. (via Hi-Fructose)

“Synonym” (2016), Polymer modified gypsum, fiberglass, powder coated aluminum, pigment, 83 x 60 x 60 inches, Edition of 5, with 1 AP

“Suspended After Image” (2012), Wood, steel, polymer gypsum, fiberglass, high density foam, plaster, paint, 126 x 282 x 204 inches

Detail of “Synonym” (2016), Polymer modified gypsum, fiberglass, powder coated aluminum, pigment, 83 x 60 x 60 inches, Edition of 5, with 1 AP

Detail of “Antonym” (2012), Steel, polymer gypsum, fiberglass, wood, foam, paint, 68 x 63 x 54 inches

Detail of “In Mortal Repose” (2011), Bronze and concrete, 72 x 71 x 63 1/4 inches

Installation view of “Falcon’s Fortress” at Boesky Gallery, (2017), Photography Credit: Object Studies

Detail of “A Measure of Ariadne’s Love” (2007), Mixed media 84 x 108 x 96 inches

“A Measure of Ariadne’s Love” (2007), Mixed media, 84 x 108 x 96 inches

Installation view of “Phantom Limb,” NYU Abu Dhabi Art Gallery, 2016

 

 



Art Craft

Shimmering Collages and Installations by Sara Shakeel Bring Bedazzled Glamour to Everyday Scenes

July 26, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Chicago-based artist Sara Shakeel used to have a career as a dentist. But she’s traded in pearly whites for a shiny new medium: crystals. Shakeel incorporates a combination of collage and original photography in her glittering work, and focuses on food, landscapes, and female figures as her primary subjects. Shimmering crystals stand in as skyscraper windows, the chocolate in an ice cream twist, and snake scales. “The Great Supper,” her recent solo show at NOW Gallery in London, afforded Shakeel the opportunity to work in three dimensions. A dining table and chairs laden with plates, dishes, food, and candlesticks were all completed covered in crystals.

The self-taught artist has no formal training, and shared in an interview with Forbes that she has always been creative, but was discouraged from pursuing art school in favor of a more pragmatic career. Despite her meandering route—she tells Forbes she loved being a dentist—Shakeel has found her bedazzled own path to success. You can see more of Shakeel’s work on Instagram, where she shares new images with nearly 1 million followers. (via Hi-Fructose)

 

 



Art

Two Collaborative Murals by Pat Perry and Local Schoolchildren Connect Communities in Iraq and Maine

July 26, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Detroit-based artist Pat Perry (previously) travels widely to create drawings, paintings, and murals inspired by the diverse cultures and landscapes of different parts of the world, often with an eye toward forgotten or marginalized people and places. Partnering with aptART and the Good Works Foundation, Perry’s most recent project took him to Maine and Iraqi Kurdistan, where he collaboratively designed and painted a pair of murals with local schoolchildren. The two fifth grade classes, located over 5,600 miles apart in Biddeford and Slemani, got to know each other by exchanging videos and artwork. They then assisted Perry with painting their own messages on the new murals.

The resulting project, OPENING LINES, depicts a child in each mural holding a red telephone. Because their backs are turned, the viewer can imagine whether each subject is speaking or listening. Surrounding each figure are doodles and messages written in both English and Arabic by Perry’s young collaborators. Samantha Robison of aptART tells Colossal, “With cultural overlap across the globe unavoidable, the peril of stereotype can be lessened by individual, personal acquaintances across borders; a literal face rather than an idea of one. The most integral part of equality is providing platforms for people to speak, to create, to be listened to.”

The video below offers a glimpse behind the scenes of OPENING LINES. You can follow along with aptART’s youth programming on Instagram and explore more of Perry’s wide-ranging humanist work (including limited edition prints) on his website and Instagram.