Art

Traditional Textiles are Unraveled and Re-Woven in Installations by Aiko Tezuka

September 4, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Berlin-based Japanese artist Aiko Tezuka carefully unravels and re-weaves elaborate textiles to form new shapes and patterns. In some works, the separated threads hang from the bottom edge of an intact textile in perfectly parallel lines; others feature threads course down in waterfall-like sheaths, reconnecting as they crash into the floor. In still others, the loose threads come together to form images and words hovering on sheer substrates. Tezuka closely studies the cultural and economic histories interwoven in different Eastern and Western textile traditions, examining the greater symbolism embedded in each decorative element.

“My essential interest has been what makes up the surface of the object; through which processes was the surface produced; how could I peel off the surface; what things could I see behind the surface; and how could I embody these things behind the surface into my work,” Tezuka shares in an artist statement. “Although we are completely surrounded by surfaces, we cannot physically enter things in even one millimeter under the surface. Every time we peel a surface, a new surface will appear immediately, like an infinite loop. How does one perceive these infinite surfaces, or loosen the surfaces that seem to be firmly interwoven?”

She has exhibited widely and her solo show “Dear Oblivion” at Michael Janssen gallery, runs from September 14 to November 16, 2019 in Berlin. Tezuka’s work is also on view September 7 – 28, 2019 at MA2 gallery in Tokyo. See more from the artist on Instagram. (via The Jealous Curator)

 

 



Craft Design Music

A New Modular Paper Organ Allows Users to Build and Tune Their Own Functional Musical Instruments

September 4, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Wolfram Kampffmeyer (previously) loves to play with paper. The German artist uses the seemingly simple material to create three-dimensional shapes and figures, often designing products that users can assemble themselves. His newest project, PAPERorgan, is a fully functioning modular organ that is fueled by an inflated balloon. The instrument can run for approximately 40 seconds on one balloon’s-worth of air, and plays a range of notes depending on how each user chooses to tune and expand their organ. For paper organ aficionados, Kampffmeyer clarifies that he has spoken with fellow instrument designer Aliaksei Zholner (previously) to ensure that his design and commercial product are not derivative or competitive.

Kampffmeyer is currently building awareness for the product and will be funding production on Kickstarter. Follow along with the journey on Instagram and Facebook, and sign up for email updates on PAPERorgan’s website.

 

 

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Art

Glitched Paintings by Olan Ventura Give a Contemporary Twist to 17th Century Still Lifes

September 4, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

“Still Life of Flowers, Shells and Insects” (2019), acrylic on canvas, 76.2 x 101.6 cm. All images courtesy of the artist, the Working Animals Art Projects and Yavuz Gallery

Filipino artist Olan Ventura creates lavish acrylic paintings in the tradition of 17th century Dutch still lifes. Replicating the smallest details of iconic works such as Jan Davidsz de Heem’s Vase of Flowers (c. 1660), Ventura veers off course with striking glitches and drips that shoot off the canvas edges, seeming to pull grapes, lobsters, and roses from the past into the present. A statement on Yavuz Gallery explains that Ventura is interested in identity, technology, popular culture. Ventura holds a Bachelor’s of Fine Arts from University of the East, and has been exhibiting in solo shows for the last 15 years. His most recent show, Colour Feast, ran this spring at Yavuz Gallery in Singapore. Ventura keeps a low profile online, but you can explore more of his still life paintings on Yavuz’s website, and a wider range of his work on artnet. (via Hi-Fructose)

“Abundant Bouquet with Pomegranate” (2019), acrylic on canvas, 162.5 x 121.9 cm

“Still Life With Golden Goblet” (2019), acrylic on canvas, 121.9 x 137.2 cm

L: “Still Life with a Melon and Pears” (2019), acrylic on canvas, 45.7 x 61 cm / R: “Fruit Basket” (2019), acrylic on canvas, 45.7 x 61 cm

“Still Life of Flowers” (2019), acrylic on canvas, 101.6 x 76.2 cm

“Fruit Still Life” (2019), acrylic on canvas, 101.6 x 76.2 cm

Yavuz Gallery installation view

Yavuz Gallery installation view

 

 



Art

Meditative Mixed-Media Paintings by Arghavan Khosravi Subtly Address Human Rights Issues

September 3, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Artist Arghavan Khosravi creates multi-part worlds in her carefully composed paintings. Contemporary human figures commingle with ghostly limbs and classical Greco-Roman sculptures. Bright red lines of string, Persian decorative motifs, and found textiles connect the disparate figures. The artist begins each painting with an intensive brainstorming and research phase, which results in a detailed sketch that outlines about 85% of the completed work.

“Before I start a new painting, I keep thinking about what I want to say in it. It can have a specific narrative or just convey a mood or feeling—it mostly reflects on a memory, life event or something I have recently read,” Khosravi explains. “While I have this general idea/theme in my mind, I go through a lot of source images and put aside those that trigger something in my mind. I juxtapose those images to come up with the main visual structure and composition.”

One of Khosravi’s main sources of inspiration is societal issues in Iran: “Human rights and, more specifically, women’s rights issues, patriarchy, and some levels of gender apartheid. I am more interested in addressing these concerns in a symbolic and subtler way and have an indirect approach.” She also studies and incorporates art historical traditions, ranging from Persian miniature painting and Islamic architecture to medieval painting and ancient sculpture.

The artist shares with Colossal that she began to take art seriously at the early age of 12, but felt pressure to pursue a more practical career like engineering. She pivoted slightly with a commercial creative career: after studying graphic design in college, Khosravi worked in the field for almost a decade, while also earning a Master’s in Fine Arts in illustration, and illustrating nearly two dozen children’s books. Last year, Khosravi achieved her dream of becoming a painter and completed her Master’s in Fine Arts in painting at the Rhode Island School of Design.

Khosravi has most recently exhibited in a group show at the Museum of Contemporary Art Yinchuan in China, and in SPRING/BREAK, a part of New York’s Armory week. You can see more of her detailed, multi-layered paintings on Instagram. (via Booooooom)

work in progress

work in progress

work in progress

 

 



Art

New Solo Exhibition by Seth Globepainter Fills a Historic Chateau in Bordeaux, France

September 1, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Collaboration with Pascal Vilcollet

French artist Julien Malland, aka Seth Globepainter (previously), has spent the summer exhibiting a large body of work inside and outside of the Institut Culturel Bernard Magrez. Located in Bordeaux, France, the historic chateau was built in the 18th century and now doubles as a cultural center. Malland’s takeover includes dozens of paintings, installations, and sculptures that have transformed the castle into a colorful record of his travels and a look into his mind.

Titled 1,2,3, Soleil, the exhibition features over 50 of the artist’s faceless characters. Each room in the chateau has a theme that represents one of Malland’s previous projects in countries around the world. Vibrant colors and geometrical shapes are complicated by themes of conflict and loneliness. The exhibition includes site-specific installations as well as collaborative pieces made with artists Mono Gonzalez and Pascal Vilcollet.

The walk through Malland’s world will remain on view in France through October 7, 2019. In addition to his solo show, Malland also recently completed two murals in Denmark as part of Kirk Gallery‘s annual Out in the Open mural initiative. To keep up with the artist’s latest projects, follow him on Instagram.

© Constant-Formé-Becherat

© Constant-Formé-Becherat

© Julien-Malland

© Julien-Malland

© Julien-Malland

© Constant-Formé-Becherat

© Constant-Formé—Becherat

© Constant-Formé-Becherat

Seth | ‘The Phoenix’ | Østerbro 22 | Aalborg (Photo: Seth)

Seth | ‘Jack in the Box’ | Østerbro 41 | Aalborg | Denmark

 

 



Art

Tiny Metal Plants, Animals, and Buildings are Liberated From Coins by Artist Micah Adams

August 31, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Toronto-based artist Micah Adams uses a jeweler’s saw to cut out the embossed animals, figures, and objects from coins of different sizes and denominations. The metal cut-outs are used to create tiny readymades and fun collages. From a growing pile of copper leaves taken from Canadian pennies, to intricate birds and flowers borrowed from foreign currency, each of Micah Adams works are hand cut using the same basic tool. Working at a smaller scale is something that the artist came to in art college while making sculptures and spending his free time in the jewelry and metal smithing department. The practice of cutting coins evolved out of using other materials.

“I was making small assemblages from things I’d collected over the years, tiny things like toys, bottle caps, beach finds and even teeth,” Adams tells Colossal. “Then I cast them in metal. They were like tiny bronzes or miniature monuments. That lead me to look for tiny things that were already metal that I could use. So I looked at coins and their designs for things I could cut-out.”

Micah Adams is currently working on another solo exhibition of his coin collages and other works which will open at MKG127 in Toronto in February 2020. He also has an Etsy shop where he sells earrings, tie tacks, and other keepsakes. For future updates and to see more of his art, follow Adams on Instagram.

 

 



Animation Science

Take a Deep Dive Into the Relative Scale of Atoms Through the Tip of a Ballpoint Pen

August 30, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

The Super Zoom is a new computer-generated animation that shows how everything in the universe is made of minuscule foundational elements. The 3 minute-long short grounds itself with a relatable starting point: a ballpoint pen and ruled paper. On the lower right side of the screen, a scale adjusts as the “camera” zooms further and further in, breaking through the pen tip’s metal surface into more and more minute layers. The Super Zoom was created by Pedro Machado, a computer graphics designer who is based in Brazil. You can watch more of Machado’s videos on Vimeo.

 

 

A Colossal

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