airplanes

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Photography

Time-Lapse Photographs Capture Swarms of Airplane Lights as They Streak Across the Night Sky

December 31, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Pete Mauney has been interested in observing the dizzying patterns of planes at night since high school. As a teenager the photographer would watch airplanes has they circled Manhattan, imagining their trajectories and how they might intersect. Although he has worked with night imaging for the few decades since, it wasn’t until he began to photograph fireflies that the idea to return to his initial inspiration struck. As he practiced and improved his techniques for long exposure and editing, he realized he could make similar images of the swarms of airplanes that were circling large cities, rather than his backyard.

“Like the fireflies, airplanes are highly engineered systems that do the same thing reliably over and over again,” Mauney tells Colossal. “The chaos and form in the images come from them not happening in the same spot, but maybe a bit more over there, introducing difference. Each image is a mystery and I find the reveal moment about as magical as one can get within the otherwise non-magical world of digital photography.”

His photographs capture the streaks of light that blaze across the night sky when slowed down during a long exposure, showcasing prismatic flashes combined with starscapes and positioned above calm environments. Mauney will have an upcoming solo exhibition at the Kleinert/James Center for the Arts (Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild) in Woodstock, New York from July 5, 2019 to August 18, 2019. You can see more of Mauney’s images, of both flying planes and darting insects, on his website and Instagram. (via Kottke)

 

 



Animation Art

Perspective: Hilariously Shortened Vehicles and Other Edited Oddities Race Around a City’s Streets

July 12, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Fernando Livschitz of Black Sheep Films (previously) edits everyday footage in order to add a touch of the bizarre to mundane scenes. In his most recent short film he imagines a world where certain vehicles have been hilariously shortened, landing tiny planes on one wheel, and racing single-car trains along a track. In addition to these edited vehicles, he removes horses and bikes from their riders, making it seems as if jockeys and bicyclists are effortlessly floating through the world. You can see more of Livschitz’s short films, many of which are Vimeo staff picks, on his website.

 

 



Art Science

Meet the Milky Way: A Timelapse Video Shot From the Cockpit of a Swiss Airliner

May 1, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Sales Wick is an airline pilot, photographer, and film producer based in Switzerland who photographs the journeys of his many international flights on his website BeyondClouds. For his video Meet the Milky Way, Wick created a timelapse of his nighttime trip from Zurich to Sao Paulo, capturing the starry sky and the glowing Milky Way straight ahead. The video was recorded in August during one of the few nights where shooting stars can be seen racing across the sky, and during the video several can be observed traveling across the screen.

You can view more of Wick’s adventures in aviation on his Instagram and Vimeo, or if you a want different perspective of the Milky Way, check out the timelapse video shot recently in Hawaii by Gavin Heffernan and Harun Mehmedinovic from SKYGLOW. (via Kottke)

 

 



Photography

Airportraits: Composite Flight Path Photos Capture Planes Landing and Departing from Worldwide Airports

October 20, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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For his ambitious Airportraits series, photographer Mike Kelley sets up camp outside of airports and meticulously photographs planes as they takeoff and land—shooting thousands of photos per location. He then uses Photoshop to isolate the planes and combines the images into the composite “portraits” you see here. Each image tells a fascinating story about the nature of each airport and the many unseen variables that affect the flight paths of each airport like noise regulations, plane size, and air traffic patterns.

When he initially began the project two years ago, Kelley’s plan was relatively straightforward: fly to 10 or so cities around the globe and spend a day or two at each airport scouting the location, taking photos, and then off to the next destination. This plan worked well in Europe where the weather was consistent, but soon he faced the reality that seasonal weather in places like Japan was completely unpredictable. In Tokyo he left without a single usable photo after days of trying. Some cities he had to return to 2-3 times in hopes the weather would improve, and in other places it would take nearly a week to photograph enough planes to make an image.

During editing, most planes are left “as is” in the location they appeared in the sky while taking off. Planes in the processes of landing proved to be more difficult. “For the landing images, I did take slight artistic liberty with the position of the aircraft, because in real life the planes follow a very specific glidepath to the touchdown point,” Kelley shares with Colossal. “If I hadn’t moved them, all the planes would be directly on top of one another and there’d be no real dynamics or movement in the image.”

In all, Kelley created 19 composite images you can explore on his website, all of which are available as limited edition fine art prints. You can see more of his photography on Instagram. (via Boing Boing, Kottke)

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Amazing Photography

A Photographer Captures An Airplane with Rainbow Contrails Above Japan

May 13, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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A digital artist and photographer who goes by the name Kagaya recently spotted this unusual sight of a commercial airliner appearing to blast a contrail of rainbows out of its engines. Spotted above Oshino-Mura, Yamanashi Prefecture in Japan, the rare phenomenon is most likely a form of cloud iridescence caused by the perfect convergence of water vapor and sunlight. Kagaya explains that he was nowhere near the event and had to use a long telephoto lens to zoom in on the plane. If you need a few more rainbows today, here’s some more examples of cloud iridescence. (via Neatorama)

 

 



Amazing Design

A Repurposed Boeing 737 Engine Cowling Makes a Fantastic… Chair

April 25, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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If you’re looking to remodel your home or office with ultimate conversation starting furniture, look no further than the 737 Cowling Chair by Fallen Furniture. The behemoth chair is made from a genuine Boeing 737 engine cowling that sits atop a spun aluminum base in the same orientation you would find on an airplane and measures nearly 6.5′ square. It’s hard not to compare the curvy space age design to something Eero Saarinen might have designed. The Bath-based furniture company specializes in making functional objects from “reclaimed, authentic aircraft parts, from both military and civilian aircraft,” and you can see more of their designs on their website and on Facebook. (via Bored Panda)

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Design

A Singapore Airlines A380 Model Plane Crafted Entirely from Manila Folders by Designer Luca Iaconi-Stewart

December 8, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

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A traditional paper airplane takes one sheet of paper and approximately 90 seconds. A Luca Iaconi-Stewart-designed paper airplane? 1,000 hours, 100 manila folders, 50 X-Acto blades, and an entire bottle of glue. The San-Francisco based designer has previously built a 1:60 scale Boeing 777 model and to the delight of detailed hobbyists everywhere he’s now constructed another, this time a scale model of a Singapore Airlines A380.

A challenge for Iaconi-Stewart was the variety of seating that comes with the plane’s design, ranging from basic economy seats to first class suites that include fully operating sliding doors. With precision he built each element of the model from delicately folded paper, the smallest piece of the 3,000 used being a 2.5 x 1 mm pin that secures each business class seat.

Videos of the plane’s construction can be seen below. More images of Iaconi-Stewart’s previous 1:60 scale Boeing 777 model can be viewed on his Flickr, and time lapse videos of his model’s construction can be seen over on his Youtube. (via The Kid Should See This and The Awesomer)

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