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Art

Vintage Jigsaw Puzzles Blended Piece-by-Piece into Surreal Montages by Tim Klein

May 5, 2020

Grace Ebert

“Pig Jaw Suzzle #2,” 11 x 9 inches. All images © Tim Klein, shared with permission

Although there’s seemingly only one way to assemble a jigsaw puzzle, Tim Klein (previously) has diverged from the traditional method of following the photo on the box to assemble unusual arrangements of hybrid animals and everyday objects. The Vancouver, Washington-based artist combines two vintage puzzles that are similar in composition, creating bizarre amalgamations that position a hedgehog on top of a muffin and mask George Washington’s face with verdant greenery and a waterfall.

In a statement, Klein said he often utilizes die-cut pieces from the same manufacturer, which allows him to plug in portions from two different sets. “I take great pleasure in discovering such strange images lying shattered, sometimes for decades, within the cardboard boxes of ordinary mass-produced puzzles,” the artist said.

Although many of Klein’s puzzles are sold out—he notes that he needs more source material to create more—you can follow the humorous combinations on Facebook.

 

Left” “Pupcake,” 10 x 10 inches. Right: “Muffin,” 10 x 10 inches

“Waterfall Grille,” 6 x 18 inches

“King of the Road,” 18 x 24 inches

“Washington,” 18 x 24 inches

“The Other Side,” 18 x 24 inches

“Metamorphosis (Unburdening),” 24 x 18 inches

“Bow Wow,” 15 x 7 inches

“Were-Rabbit,” 11 x 9 inches

 

 



Art Design

Solve Your Life Problems with These Outlandish Remedies by Artist Dana Wyse

May 5, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Dana Wyse

Dana Wyse has a cureall for, well, everything. Can’t make the bed properly? There’s a pill for that. Need to be a bestselling writer ASAP? An injection is all you need. Struggling to figure out the meaning of life? There’s a capsule for that, too.

The Canadian artist dreamed up Jesus Had a Sister Productions, which she describes as “a fictional pharmaceutical company specializing in quick-fix medicines, dehydrated space food, discount time travel, spy electronics, transistor radios, invisible things, sneaky life hacks.” She’s designed various pills, solutions, and DIY kits in humorous packages meant to remedy any problem with a single dosage.

In an interview with Konbini, Wyse said she first thought of the utopic series in France.

In Paris, I was surprised to find three pharmacies on every street. As I explored the city, I found small packages of unopened medicines on the sidewalk. So I picked them up and wondered what they could be. Imagine if these pills were magic ?! If I swallowed them all at the same time, would they make me speak French or play Barracuda on the electric guitar?

Her discarded findings launched the ironic project that hearkens back to American advertising from the 1960s, which vehemently enforced stereotypes. The fictional company’s tagline reads, “Helping you to create your own reality. Since 1786.”

See the full collection (NSFW!) on Wyse’s site, and follow her future remedies on Instagram. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 

 



Animation Photography

Artist François Vogel Turns His Unaware Cat into a Wriggling Jellyfish

April 28, 2020

Grace Ebert

Based on a recent cameo, François Vogel ’s cat actually might enjoy a dip in the ocean despite his feline instincts to avoid it. The Abyssinian has been stretched and distorted in a series of humorous clips made by his French owner, including one that lengthens and spirals the cat’s legs like flowing jellyfish tendrils. The unsuspecting pet also is stretched across the dining room and launched into an expanding sea of fish that he slowly swims through.

Vogel, who lives and works in the Parisian suburb Meudon, used slit-scan photography and time displacement in After Effects to twist and warp his cat’s figure. Head to Instagram to see his extensive backlog of comical distortions that includes turning his daughter into a seagull. (via Laughing Squid)

 

 

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Design

Assemble the Jagged Pieces of This Shattered Puzzle and Fix ‘The Accident’

April 24, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Yelldesign

While most shattered glass heads straight to the trash, Yelldesign’s panes actually can be reassembled into a single sheet, turning a groan-inducing mistake into a delightfully tedious activity. Comically titled “The Accident,” the acrylic puzzle is comprised of 215 jagged and cracked pieces resembling a broken window. Yelldesign warns, though, that although you don’t have to worry about getting cut or scratched by the pointed edges, assembly isn’t an easy feat.

An animation studio venturing into design, the company also released two other clear puzzles: “The Fish Tank” surrounds an orange guppy in the form of a single piece, while “The Virus” contains a green contagion at its center. These jigsaws come amid an ongoing boom in puzzle sales as people around the world are looking to occupy themselves in quarantine.

To pick up your own humorous puzzle, head to Yelldesign’s site (a heads up that all prices are in AUD). Follow the company on Instagram and Vimeo, too.

 

 



Art

A Tiny Lizard Attends Miniature Gallery Opening to See ‘American Gecko’ and ‘The Birth of Gecko’

April 17, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Jill Young

The Gecko Museum’s opening only had one visitor to consider its most prized pieces: a mango-loving crested gecko that goes by The Mayor. Arriving around 7 p.m., the nocturnal lizard visited his personal gallery earlier this week, stopping to contemplate “American Gecko” and “The Birth of Gecko.” Dallas-based Jill Young, who both painted and curated the miniature museum’s permanent collection as part of a humorous quarantine activity, told Hyperallergic that “The Mayor was particularly fond of my ‘American Gothic’ spoof, ‘American Gecko.’ I guess he’s in an American Modernism phase.”

Similar to the brothers, Pandoro and Tiramisù, that disregarded signs requesting they not chew on the furniture or artworks in The Gerbil Museum, The Mayor ignored the red rope cordoning off the artworks. “I now understand that The Mayor’s relationship to art is a necessarily tactile one, which I can appreciate,” Young said. Despite her gecko’s unconventional approach to art, though, Young hopes to see the small-scale trend continue. “Every pet deserves a cultural outing,” she said.

 

 



Design Food

A Ridiculously Long Chain Reaction Brings Social Distancing to the Dinner Table

April 16, 2020

Grace Ebert

The latest humorous invention by Joseph Herscher designed to maintain social distancing practices during a meal might abide by the six-foot rule, but it definitely requires a little bit of patience, especially for those who are super hungry. The Rube Goldberg-esque sequence in “Pass The Pepper: Social Distancing is Nothing to Sneeze At” spans about five minutes in a ridiculous series of reactions that include balls rolling down shoots, spaghetti cooking half-way, and a horrifying coffee spill on an open laptop.

Herscher bills the comical system as a “fool-proof method for completely safe, germ-free passing of condiments across the table.” To see more of the New York-based creator’s eccentric machines, head to Instagram and YouTube. Check out his salt sequence, too.

 

 



Art

“My Wife Hates it When I Work From Home” — Banksy Shares Rats Run Amok in his Bathroom from Quarantine

April 15, 2020

Christopher Jobson

Presumably quarantined like the rest of humanity, Banksy just posted a few images of an artwork executed in his supposed home bathroom. The installation depicts a mischievous pack of his signature rats destroying everything in sight: swinging from towel racks, running on toilet paper, marking the days of quarantine on the wall, and making a disgusting mess of the toilet. The caption accompanying the work on Instagram reads simply, “My wife hates it when I work from home.”