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Art

Humorous Digital Collages by Les Creatonautes Give Edible Objects Animalistic Additions

September 14, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

A garlic-bodied bird, alligator-shaped brie, and winged salt shaker have all come out of the imaginative mind of French creative agency Les Creatonautes. This past year they have created a series of digital collages that combine sporting goods, animals, and edible objects. The project is a subtle gesture to our changing world, showcasing the evolution of society through absurd combinations and impractical animals.

“The world is in permanent change, it is in a transformation,” said Olivier Grossmann of Les Creatonautes to Colossal. “This transformation, often invisible, sometimes unexpected, is inevitable. Living organisms, landscapes, technologies, societies: everything changes constantly, at different rates. From this observation we decided to transform the world in our own way.”

The group started the project on January 1st, 2018 and has been publishing “transformations” each day since. You can see more of the oddball explorations on their Instagram.

 

 



Animation

ENOUGH: Humorous Stop Motion Film Examines Our Inner Desire to Lose Control

September 5, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Swedish director and animator Anna Mantzaris has a penchant for the darkly humous as seen in her 2012 film But Milk is Important. Her recent short ENOUGH was made during her first year at the Royal College of Art where she graduated earlier this year. The stop motion film follows several kind-looking characters as they snap during everyday occurrences such as frustrating board meetings, dealing with demanding customers, or just narrowly missing the bus.

“I wanted to have quite soft and sympathetic characters, to contrast with the less soft actions,”Mantzaris explained to Directors Notes. “I also liked them to feel a bit awkward and uncomfortable, just as we can feel sometimes in social situations. I also wanted it to feel a bit grey and boring, to enhance the feeling of an everyday life that we sometimes want to break out from.”

The funny animation is a cathartic release of the darkness we carry bottled up inside, and showcases what might happen if you finally let yourself lose control. The London-based director recently worked on Wes Anderson’s film Isle of Dogs and has won several awards for her films including the Walt Disney Award for Best Graduation Film and the Audience Award at Ottawa International Animation Festival. You can see more of her short films on her website and Vimeo. (via Short of the Week)

 

 



Art

Sliced Footwear Arranged in Uncanny Configurations by Sakir Gokcebag

September 4, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Turkish-born visual artist Şakir Gökçebağ (previously) deconstructs everyday objects, often eradicating their original functionality in order to form humorous installations. His works are created from items one might find around the house such as hula hoops, brooms, toilet paper rolls, and pairs of worn shoes. The later series of altered footwear spans more than 15 years, and has been installed in surreal arrangements both inside and out of the gallery.

For these pieces Gökçebağ chops the front toe off of neutral-toned work boots and other sturdy footwear. He then arranges the pieces in circles, rows, and parallel lines that split elevated platforms. The installations appear digitally composed, and playing a trick on the viewer as they attempt to decode the visual manipulation. Gökçebağ has lived and worked in Hamburg, Germany since 2001. You can see more of his oddly arranged objects, like this belt that has been sliced and folded to appear like a ribbon, on his Instagram.

 

 

 

 



Art

New Fictional Self-Help Titles Present Existential Messages on Faded Book Covers

August 24, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Johan Deckmann (previously) presents existential notions of life, love, and self-doubt as self-help titles on hand-painted books. The fictionalized novels contain no words on their pages, however their size often directly correlates to the messages on the front covers, such as his series of blue books, which read “Good ideas” on the smallest, “Mediocre ideas” on the mid-sized work, and “Bad ideas,” on the largest.

The Copenhagen-based artist is also a practicing psychotherapist who recognizes how language can be a powerful tool in both art and therapy. “The right words can be like good medicine,” he explained in a statement for the Faurschou Foundation in Copenhagen. His chosen phrases are both humorous and wise, often cutting to a deep truth with just a handful of words like his title “How to search forever for what is already inside.”

In addition to books, Deckmann also paints poignant messages on record sleeves, wooden boxes, and briefcases. He recently had an exhibition at the Arp Museum in Remagen, Germany titled “It Takes Time, It’s Risky and It Might Last Forever” which closed in mid-July. You can see more of his works on his website and Instagram.

 

 



Art

New Miniature Warning Signs and Other Humorous and Unexpected Interventions by Michael Pederson

August 22, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Michael Pederson, a.k.a. Miguel Marquez Outside (previously), installs miniature signs, work sites, and queues in unassuming locations, transforming ordinary plants and objects into moments of intrigue for unsuspecting passersby. In one recent work he tracks the lifespan of a solitary weed poking through a sidewalk crack. A tiny wooden ladder leans against a sign that marks the number of days the plant has been growing. In another work he installed two small stanchions in front of a hole in a stone wall. A small sign reads “Please wait here until called,” presenting the illusion that a mouse-sized club or popular eatery exists on the other side. You can see more of Pederson’s small-scale interventions and humorous additions to commonplace landscapes on Instagram and tumblr.

   

 

 

 



Art

New Furry Collages Stretch and Distort Famous Cats and Canines

August 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

We just recently covered a new set of collages by Lola Dupre (previously), but couldn’t resist sharing her latest series of stretched and distorted animals. Dupre began focusing on cats and dogs after creating several works based on her own pet Charlie, who appears again in this new series. The Scotland-based artist also created collages based on Instagram-famous pets such as @hosico_cat and @mywhiskeygirl. She hopes to expand the furry series, eventually including a selection of raccoons, foxes, sheep, opossums, and more. You can purchase an original collage on her website, and follow along with the new series on tumblrInstagram, and Behance.

 

 



Art

Mosaic Vermin Invade New York City as Part of Jim Bachor’s Latest Pothole Interventions

July 20, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Jim Bachor (previously) has been filling potholes with mosaics in Chicago and beyond for the last five years, combining his art practice with public service to create popsicles, flowers, and the Chicago city flag. The cheeky creations are one part beautification, one part nudge to city infrastructure, and are meant to exist in situ as both solution and artwork.

Bachor just returned from a trip to New York City where he installed five new mosaics as a part of his series Vermin of New York. All of the pieces—a dead rat, pigeon, cockroach, portrait of Donald Trump, and a bouquet of flowers—were installed in Brooklyn or Manhattan. “A lot of my work is pretty upbeat, so I try and be a little unpredictable to keep people of balance—hence the vermin,” Bachor tells Colossal.

Just days after installation his cockroach, portrait of Donald Trump, and bouquet were removed by the transportation department, something that has never happened to previous 67 installs. You can see the works that have managed to stay in the ground on his Instagram.