humor

Posts tagged
with humor



Amazing Photography

Stop and Smell the Flowers: Dick van Duijn Captured a Squirrel’s Floral Delight

September 19, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

All photographs © Dick van Duijn, shared with permission of the artist

This summer, while traveling in Vienna, Dutch photographer Dick van Duijn captured an indelible moment of natural connection between a ground squirrel and a yellow flower. The photographer was in Vienna specifically to document ground squirrels. In an interview with PetaPixel van Duijn explained, “On the first day we observed them and their behavior. On the second day, we photographed them the whole day. In the evening just before sunset, when the light became soft and nice, one of the many ground squirrels walked towards the yellow flower and began to hold it and sniff it.” You can purchase prints of this and other flower-enamored squirrel’s in van Duijn’s online store, and see more of his work and travels on Instagram. (via PetaPixel)

 

 



Art Photography

Photographs of Animals and Architecture are Sliced and Rearranged into Bizarre Collages by Lola Dupre

August 27, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Spain and Scotland-based collage artist Lola Dupre (previously) continues to surprise and delight with her unusual composite images. Rather than incorporating unique individual collage elements that contrast with each other, Dupre works with repetition and duplication to build bizarrely proportioned pets, buildings, and human figures. By layering and off-setting shards of the same photo in a sort of visual syncopation, Dupre stretches and bends otherwise familiar subjects into surreal images.

The artist recently exhibited work in the show “The Age of Collage 2” at Feinkunst Krueger gallery in Hamburg, Germany, and currently has a piece in “Lunacy” at Prescription Art in Brighton, U.K. You can see more of Dupre’s collages on Instagram and tumblr, and peruse originals and prints in her online store.

 

 

 



Art Design Food

Cheese Slices, Condiments, and Other Object Collections Bound into Books by Ben Denzer

August 23, 2019

Andrew LaSane

“20 SLICES of American Cheese” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

Toying with the concept of what a book can be, American designer Ben Denzer (through his publishing house Catalog Press) binds unusual collections of objects to create humorous volumes that you’re unlikely to find in a library. The limited edition books have been sold in the Whitney Shop, landing in the hands of a few lucky collectors. The unique objects have also found their way into the collections of museums and universities around the world.

A graphic designer with a degree in Architecture and Certificate in the Visual Arts, Denzer has created books of bound cheese slices, ketchup and sweetener packets, napkins, sequentially numbered dollar bills, and other books. The covers and spines feature the Catalog Press logo as well as well bold text announcing what the “reader” will find inside. In an interview with Its Nice That, Denzer shared his stance on books as “both content and object; simultaneously sculpture and catalog, singular contained multitudes.” He added that through Catalog Press he can “use the idea of the book as a catalogue to explore these wackier ideas while at the same time experimenting with more constrained design moves.”

Ben Denzer’s exploration of books can also be seen in his Ice Cream Books project which pairs real books with their ice cream complement. To see more of his work, check out his online portfolio and follow Denzer on Instagram.

“20 SLICES of American Cheese”Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

“5 KETCHUPS” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

“5 KETCHUPS” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

“INFLATABLE BOOK JACKET” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

“$200 IN ORDER” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

“FOUR FLIP BOOKS” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

“15 MASS MARKET PAPERBACKS” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

“30 NAPKINS from The Plaza Hotel” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

“200 FORTUNES” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

 

 



Art Design Food

Le Corbuffet: Conceptual Cookbook Presents Art-Inspired Recipes as Contemporary Sculptures

August 22, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

From the mind of Esther Choi comes a new cookbook titled Le Corbuffet: Edible Art and Design Classics. The writer, photographer, and artist has compiled a list of recipes inspired by artists, designers, and their creations, all staged in contemporary arrangements. Recipes seek to distill the practices of figures such as Frida Kahlo and Barbara Kruger into their best and most delicious aspects—like the crisp and bright Frida Kale-o Salad, or the crimson-colored and acerbic Rhubarbara Kruger Compote.

The idea was first launched during a series of participatory dinner parties Choi hosted in 2015 after discovering a 1937 menu designed by artist László Moholy-Nagy for Bauhaus founder and architect Walter Gropius. After creating her own set of detailed dishes, she decided to compile them into a book that would be a playful spin on the artists she admired.

“I hosted the first in a series of ‘Le Corbuffets’ in my Brooklyn apartment, a project which carried on until 2017,” she explains on her website. “Offering meals to an assortment of guests, these social gatherings revolved around the consumption of absurd, pun-inspired dishes that referred to canonical artists and designers. As a commentary on the status of art, food, and design as commodities to be ‘gobbled up’ by the market, the project deliberately twisted idioms to explore the notion of ‘aesthetic consumption’ though taste and perception.”

Le Corbuffet will be published October 1, 2019. You can see her photographs, in additions to snippets of recipes from what she describes as “a conceptual artwork in the form of a cookbook” in the following images, and learn more about her art and writing by following her on Instagram.

 

 



Photography

Passport Photos Widened to Reveal Unexpected Chaos Hiding Just Beyond of the Frame

August 19, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Max Siedentopf was in the process of getting his picture taken to renew his passport. As he sat in front of the camera, he began thinking of all of the ridiculous restraints placed on the small image —no smile, or patterns, or glasses, or anything interesting whatsoever. Siedentopf decided to create an alternate reality for a set of these “boring” identification images, creating regulation passport photos from scenes of intrigue, and often chaos.

The London-based visual artist recruited a cast of friends and strangers to sit for passport photos. Above the shoulders the participants are straight-faced and rigid, yet below they are balancing full wine glasses along their arms, taped to a wall, or even on fire. The humorous series explores the fringes of mundane government tasks, while imbuing some personality in the utterly quotidian. You can see more examples from his Passport Photos series on his website and Instagram. (via PetaPixel)

 

 



Art Design

Bizarre D.I.Y. Balloon-Destroying Devices by Jan Hakon Erichsen

August 16, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Don’t invite Jan Hakon Erichsen to your next birthday party. The Norwegian artist is on a mission to destroy every balloon he encounters with an endless array of awkward Rube Goldberg-esque setups. Erichsen documents his inventions in “Destruction Diary” videos, which he posts daily on Instagram, and aggregates into compilations on YouTube. Erichsen’s usual balloon-popping tool of choice is a steak knife, but he has also employed bananas, cacti, and saws to do the deed. The artist explains in a statement that he “works within a variety of media focusing on topics like fear, anger and frustration”. In addition to his balloon-centric video work, Erichson explores other found materials in his structural D.I.Y. projects, which you can see on his website. If you enjoy Erichsen’s creations, also check out Simone Giertz’s robots.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Jan Hakon Erichsen (@janerichsen) on

 

 



Design

Put Words into Action with ‘Gerry’, a New Font Created From the Silhouettes of Gerrymandered Electoral Districts

August 13, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Apologies to anyone who shares the name, but two designers in Chicago are taking on electoral gerrymandering in a new font called Gerry. The font, created by Ben Doessel and James Lee, is composed of 26 districts whose absurd boundaries resemble alphabet letters much more than they resemble logical, cohesive population groupings. Alabama’s pronged 1st District bears a striking resemblance to the letter K, while New York’s 8th District looks like an M with its tall legs connected by a curved middle.

“Gerry” is available for download on a dedicated website, UglyGerry.com, which also includes a Twitter integration allowing visitors to thank their Representatives for their contributions to the font. If you’re interested in learning more about Gerrymandering, we recommend this John Oliver segment. (via Hyperallergic)