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Photography

Restless Cities Cycle Through Day and Night in Time Slice Videos by Dan Marker-Moore

May 1, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Global metropolises known for their 24/7 energy glimmer around the clock in captivating time slice videos by Dan Marker-Moore. The skylines of Los Angeles, Kowloon, London, and Shanghai move through dawn, daytime, and dusk in precise slivers that capture specific moments of natural and man-made light. In an interview with Adorama, the photographer explains that he usually uses between 20 and 40 unique images to strike a balance between providing noticeable visual shifts and containing the busyness. The resulting images convey the endless motion of city life while also forming unusual geometric shapes that center around specific architectural details like LA’s Griffith Observatory or London’s Big Ben clocktower.

Marker-Moore, who is based in Los Angeles, works as a photographer, cinematographer, producer, and director. In addition to his vast trove of personal and editorial projects, he also has a decade of experience in animation and motion graphics for commercials. Marker-Moore is passionate about the technical aspects of still and moving images, and shares extensive notes on his blog and Lightroom tutorials on YouTube. You can see more from Marker-Moore on Instagram, and also check out his worldwide pay phone documention.

 

 



Art

Human-Powered Clocks by Maarten Baas Physically Mark the Passage of Time

March 14, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Dutch artist Maarten Baas produces artworks that lie at the intersection of visual art, performance, and design, creating manual clocks that are erased and redrawn on the stroke of each minute. In pieces like Grandfather Clock and Schiphol Clock Baas places himself within the structure of the time-telling devices, functioning as the works’ human mechanism. Other pieces from his Real Time series use the assistance of another performer to create 12-hour films, such as a line of perpetually swept trash doubling as a clock arm. Baas began the time-based series in 2009 at the Salone Del Mobile in Milan, Italy, and has a current piece in the group exhibition Design by Time at the Pratt Institute through April 13, 2019. You can see more of his works on his website, Instagram, and Vimeo, and in the videos below.

 

 

 



Art

Sunlight Casts Shadows of Phrases Exploring Theories of Time in a Street Art Installation by DAKU

January 15, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Pseudonymous Indian street artist DAKU recently installed an immersive text-based work in Panjim, Goa. Placed along 31st January Road, a fishnet structure suspends letters above pedestrians. The region’s abundant sunlight pours through to cast shadows on the street, spelling out tropes about the passage of time. Some of the phrases include, “Time works wonders. Time moves. Time flies over us, but leaves its shadow behind. Time fades. Time is an illusion.” The temporary installation, titled Theory of Time, was supported by the public art nonprofit St+art India, as part of the Start Goa festival.  DAKU often integrates language into his urban interventions. You can see more from the artist on Instagram.

 

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Art

‘Salt Years,’ Explores Sigalit Landau’s Lifetime Relationship With the Dead Sea

December 14, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Israeli artist Sigalit Landau (previously) has a practice that is deeply tied to working with the Dead Sea. Landau uses the hypersaline body of water as both a photographic backdrop and medium to suspend everyday objects, creating densely salt-encrusted sculptures. The items she chooses for her pieces are sometimes simply based on their textures and shapes, while others are chosen in order to filter memories that have been passed down to the artist through her parents and grandparents.

“These objects leave ‘the game’ of being useful ‘things’ and enter a new realm – the open space of representation,” said Landau to Colossal. “They loose their old features and dimensions and inhale a certain pureness of spirit, treated by climate and enhanced by emotion.”

A new book titled Salt Years, explores Landau’s process, bringing a new perspective to her salt crystal sculptures, video art, and images created over the last 15 years. Within the book Landau explores her process of “baptizing” objects in the Dead Sea’s waters, showcasing how the salt-filled sea breathes new life into the inanimate works through behind-the-scenes photos, and personal notes and essays.

You can pre-order the 288-page book through Landau’s Indiegogo campaign, and follow its progress through the book’s Facebook.

 

 



Design

Float Through Time with Flyte’s New Magnetized Clock

February 15, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Tell time or count down the moments until your next big life event with STORY, a new magnetized piece from Flyte (previously). The company’s latest design is an improvement to the wall clock, a work that uses powerful magnetism to move a hovering metal ball around STORY’s edge.

The designed object was built with three modes. With the Journey setting, you can set your mechanism to a specific date, watching the magnetic ball travel along the circular piece of wood until the ball reaches an upcoming moment such as a vacation or birth of a child. Selecting Clock allows you to use the object more like a traditional timepiece, and finally Timer acts as a short term countdown for kitchen prep or time out.

STORY also features a shining digital display to add detail to your chosen setting, and is backlit to be seen in the dark. When synced with Flyte’s mobile app, you can also use the backlight to demonstrate realtime sunsets, sunrises, and phases of the moon.

STORY was just launched on Kickstarter. You can see more of Flyte’s levitating designs, including a set of floating planters, on their website.

 

 

 



Design

This 24-Hour Clock Gradually Transitions You From Dusk to Dawn

June 13, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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All images via Scott Thrift

Instead of being a slave to the numbers on your clock, designer Scott Thrift would like you to have a more peaceful relationship to your timepiece, one that revolves around gradients and soothing colors rather than numerals. Today, his newest design, is a 24-hour timepiece that moves at half the speed of a typical clock, and operates on times of the day rather than numeric classifications. The subtle blues and purples that make up the clock’s gradient break down the day into dawn, noon, dusk, and midnight, allowing for a gradual transition rather than one that evokes stress by watching numbers tick by.

You can preorder Today on Thrift’s Kickstarter, or visit his previous clock design The Present on his website. (via My Modern Met)

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Art Photography

Photographic Images That Weave Moments in Time by Jason Chen

April 25, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Detail of “K,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 22.75in x 28.75, all images via Paradigm Gallery + Studio, Philadelphia

Moving beyond traditionally static methods of portraiture, Jason Chen creates movement through the weaving of multiple images into one. Chen’s works use separate images of the same subject to explore mutation and time, offering a more fluid peek into his subject’s emotional state. When glanced at from afar the images appear quite singular, but when zoomed in the disparate details of the images stand out—multiple eyes occupying the same face like seen in Chen’s haunting G-iii.

This is a relatively new method for the Philadelphia-based photographer who had been previously focused on dry plate tintypes. Chen is the co-founder of Paradigm Gallery + Studio where he is currently included in the group exhibition “Portrait”  through June 18th. (via Hi Fructose)

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“K,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 22.75in x 28.75

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“Ian” (2016), archival pigment print, hand cut and woven, 24”h x 36”w

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“Jessica” (2016), archival pigment print, hand cut and woven, 24”h x 36” w

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Detail of “Jessica” (2016), archival pigment print, hand cut and woven, 24”h x 36” w

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“C,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 9in x 11in

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“G-iii,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 22.75in x 28.75

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Detail of “G-iii,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 22.75in x 28.75

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“G-ii,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 20.5in x 20.5in