A 300-Foot Tunnel Excavated Through Walls Examines the Creative and Destructive Powers of Mankind

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All images courtesy Daniel Arsham

In his latest exhibition, “The Future Was Then,”  Daniel Arsham (previously here and here) carved a path through the SCAD Museum of Art’s Pamela Elaine Poetter Gallery utilizing a series of faux concrete walls. The 300-foot-long series of walls starts with the cutout of an abstract shape roughly the size of a human body. As one looks at the progression of carvings and walls, the holes begin to form a representational shape, ending in the fully formed outline of a life-size human.

The “Wall Excavation” installation explores how mankind interacts with architecture, continuously building and destroying the walls around them. This central installation points to this idea directly, showing the path of destruction around a singular human form. By standing between the carved walls, visitors can literally place themselves in the the timeline of our intimate history with architecture, finding their own place amidst the excavated exhibition.

You can follow Arsham’s work on Twitter and Instagram, and learn more about his collaborative art and architecture project Snarkitecture here. “The Future Was Then” will be on display at SCAD through July 24, 2016. (via Designboom)

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