A Rocking Chair That Knits You a Hat as You Read the Paper 

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All images via Gessato

Two longtime porch activities are now combined into one simple contraption thanks to designers Damien Ludi and Colin Peillex, creators of the Rocking Knit. The wooden rocking chair is rigged to knit as you sway back and forth, producing a cap from minimal energy output. The invention was produced as a part of Ecole cantonale d’art de Lausanne‘s Low-Tech Factory, a workshop that encourages students from the industrial design program to invent simple machines that at once create an experience and a material good. Ludi and Peillex premiered their contraption at Designer’s Saturday in Langenthal, Switzerland and produced a video that demonstrates their invention below. (via My Modern Met)

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Sponsor // Frustrated By Figure Sketching? Not Anymore With 50% Off This Online Craftsy Class 

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When you feel comfortable sketching people in motion, capturing scenes brimming with life becomes easy and enjoyable! Join Urban Sketchers correspondent and instructor Suhita Shirodkar in her new online Craftsy class, Figure Sketching Made Simple. Receive 50% off Suhita’s video lessons — a special, one-week offer for Colossal readers — and discover loose, gestural techniques that allow you to sketch expressive figures in a flash.

Watch these lessons anytime and as many times as you want to learn all about bringing a fresh perspective to sketching people. Suhita will start by introducing you to “verb” drawing and line-of-action techniques, as well as how to apply these methods to drawing figures from a variety of angles. Along the way, you’ll also pick up tips for shading, composition and enhancing your focal point with watercolor.

Visit Craftsy now to get 50% off the online class, Figure Sketching Made Simple, and enjoy your video lessons risk-free with Craftsy’s full money-back guarantee. Offer expires April 11, 2016 at 11:59pm MT.

A 150-Year-Old Porcelain Warehouse in Japan Opens for Daily ‘Treasure Hunts’ for Just $45 

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The Kouraku Kiln was founded in Arita (Saga Prefecture, Japan) in 1865 and has been producing ceramics for the past 150 years. Over that time the facility has accumulated a vast collection of pottery that has, for one reason or another, gone unsold. The warehouse is so vast that some workers use a bicycle to get from one side to the other. And they’ll be the first to admit that even they don’t really know what’s in there. The production facility is now inviting visitors on a “treasure hunt” to try and get rid of some of their stock.

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Here’s how the treasure hunt works:

— Make your reservation by phone (they only allow 10 people per day)
— Show up at your designated time and select your course and pay: 5,000 yen or 10,000 yen (about $45 to $90)
— Get a 30-min tour of the facility
— Begin your 90-min treasure hunt. You’ll be given a pair of gloves, a flashlight and a basket. You can take home everything you fit in your basket.
— The more expensive course gives you access to a special section of decoratively painted ceramics but both allow you to take home as much as you can fit in your basket. Once done you’ll get to wrap everything up in newspaper so that nothing breaks on your way home.

It sounds like a really fun excursion! They even have an English-speaking staff on hand to assist foreigners.

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(Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

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A New 3D Graffiti Mural in Hong Kong by Peeta 

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Venice-based artist Peeta merges his passions for graffiti writing, sculpture, and design in his large-scale spray murals that look like swirling three dimensional objects that float just above a wall or canvas. The trompe l’oeil artworks take on the form of graffiti-like letterforms but aren’t necessarily meant to be read or deciphered. Instead the pieces focus more on the use of line, shadow, and color to build impressive voluminous shapes that explode in every direction.

Peeta created this latest mural for the HKWALLS festival. The piece occupies a giant facade on a busy Hong Kong intersection above the Golden Computer Arcade and draws its color for neighboring buildings and signs. You can see his behind-the-scenes process over on Behance.

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Secret Rooms Installed Inside Abandoned Manhole Covers on the Streets of Milan 

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In this new series of outdoor installations artist Briancoshock has turned abandoned manhole covers on the streets of Milan into cramped miniature rooms complete with hanging artwork, kitchen utencils, and tiled walls. Titled Borderlife, the artist says the admittedly humorous pieces are meant to draw attention to a more serious issue in Bucharest, where many hundreds of people now live underground in the sewer system. You can learn more about these newest interventions on his website and on Facebook. (via StreetArtNews, This Isn’t Happiness)

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Olympic Athletes Crafted From Layers of Paper by Raya Sader Bujana 

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Barcelona-based paper artist Raya Sader Bujana designed these fantastic serial plane paper figures in collaboration with photographer Garcia Mendez for an Olympic themed stock photography shoot. Each figure is cut from up to 150 pieces of paper joined by hundreds of tiny 3mm separators to create the delicate layering effect. Bujana shares more her process over on All Things Paper and you can see some of her unrelated origami jewelry in her Etsy shop. The photos seen here were shot by Leo García Mendez.

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