Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Decoy Study (Duck), 2014. 15 x 5 x 6 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Decoy Study (Duck), 2014. 15 x 5 x 6 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Decoy Study (Duck), 2014. 15 x 5 x 6 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Souvenir Skeleton, 2014. (re-)carved African drummer figure. 10 x 5 x 26 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Souvenir Skeleton, 2014. (re-)carved African drummer figure. 10 x 5 x 26 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Souvenir Skeleton, 2014. (re-)carved African drummer figure. 10 x 5 x 26 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Souvenir Skeleton, 2014. (re-)carved African drummer figure. 10 x 5 x 26 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Shaman Anatomy, 2014. (re-)carved South American shaman bust. 5 x 5 x 20 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Shaman Anatomy, 2014. (re-)carved South American shaman bust. 5 x 5 x 20 inches.

Artist Maskull Lasserre Carves Imagined Skeletons into Souvenir Sculptures and Decoys wood sculpture anatomy
Shaman Anatomy, 2014. (re-)carved South American shaman bust. 5 x 5 x 20 inches.

For his latest body of work, artist Maskull Lasserre acquired a number of souvenir sculptures, the kind found in antique stores or craft fairs that have been mass-produced by anonymous artists, which he then used as a foundation for his own artwork. In a process he refers to as “re-carving,” Lasserre removed details from the artist’s original work to reveal intricate skeletal structures, a process we’ve marveled at numerous times over the last few years here on Colossal. If you happen to be in New York, the pieces are on view for two more days at Junior Projects as part of the Regular JOhn show curated by Jim Lee. You can see many more photos of each piece over in Lasserre’s portfolio. (via Design Milk)

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Designer Marcel Dunger Creates Jewelry by Fusing Colorful Bio-Resin to Pieces of Broken Maple Wood

Designer Marcel Dunger Creates Jewelry by Fusing Colorful Bio Resin to Pieces of Broken Maple Wood wood resin jewelry fashion

Designer Marcel Dunger Creates Jewelry by Fusing Colorful Bio Resin to Pieces of Broken Maple Wood wood resin jewelry fashion

Designer Marcel Dunger Creates Jewelry by Fusing Colorful Bio Resin to Pieces of Broken Maple Wood wood resin jewelry fashion

Designer Marcel Dunger Creates Jewelry by Fusing Colorful Bio Resin to Pieces of Broken Maple Wood wood resin jewelry fashion

Designer Marcel Dunger Creates Jewelry by Fusing Colorful Bio Resin to Pieces of Broken Maple Wood wood resin jewelry fashion

Designer Marcel Dunger Creates Jewelry by Fusing Colorful Bio Resin to Pieces of Broken Maple Wood wood resin jewelry fashion

Designer Marcel Dunger Creates Jewelry by Fusing Colorful Bio Resin to Pieces of Broken Maple Wood wood resin jewelry fashion

Product designer Marcel Dunger conceived of this fascinating and elegent way of creating small rings, pendants, and earrings by “repairing” broken pieces of maple wood with colored bio-resins. The resin is first poured onto a larger piece of broken wood and after the hardening process the piece is then machined into pieces of jewelry.

We’ve seen so many different projects using resin lately from sculptures of aquatic life to hair ornaments, but what’s probably more interesting, as pointed out by The Fox is Black’s Bobby Solomon, is the trend of visibly incorporating repairs into new or improved objects. We’ve seen it with Japanese Kintsugi pieces, furniture created by fusing tree trunks with cast aluminum, and even another wood/resin combo resulting in glowing kitchen shelves. As far as turning waste products into functional objects, or extending the life of something broken, it’s a visually striking idea that will hopefully be incorporated by more artists and designers. You can see more of Dunger’s work in his online portfolio. (via The Fox is Black, Behance)

Update: Jewelry designer Britta Boeckmann creates a similar form of jewelry and has quite a few pieces available in her shop.

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Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Stockholm-based illustrator, printmaker, and artist Nina Lindgren was been working with cardboard to build a series of stacked geometric cityscapes that look like small architectural islands. The works are assembled like puzzles from carefully cut cardboard panels with internal lights for some of the houses. Her most recent piece, “Floating City” was recently on view at ArtRebels Gallery. You can see more over on her website. (via Hi-Fructose)

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Color Coded Food and Flowers Photographed by Emily Blincoe

Color Coded Food and Flowers Photographed by Emily Blincoe food flowers color

Color Coded Food and Flowers Photographed by Emily Blincoe food flowers color

Color Coded Food and Flowers Photographed by Emily Blincoe food flowers color

Color Coded Food and Flowers Photographed by Emily Blincoe food flowers color

Color Coded Food and Flowers Photographed by Emily Blincoe food flowers color

Color Coded Food and Flowers Photographed by Emily Blincoe food flowers color

Color Coded Food and Flowers Photographed by Emily Blincoe food flowers color

Color Coded Food and Flowers Photographed by Emily Blincoe food flowers color

Photographer Emily Blincoe (previously) continues to make us smile with her arrays of food and plants perfectly organized by color. Blincoe collects every color permutation of tomatoes, oranges, eggs, and even candy and then sorts them into groups and gradients for each image. Her wildly popular photos have attracted a huge following on Instagram and Tumblr, and many are available as prints.

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Art and Craft: A Documentary about Mark Landis, One of the Most Prolific Art Forgers in U.S. History

Art and Craft: A Documentary about Mark Landis, One of the Most Prolific Art Forgers in U.S. History movies forgery documentary

Art and Craft: A Documentary about Mark Landis, One of the Most Prolific Art Forgers in U.S. History movies forgery documentary

Art and Craft is a new feature documentary about art forger Mark Landis (previously) who is arguably one of the most prolific art forgers in U.S. history, having tricked over 60 museums in 20 states into believing his masterfully created replicas are authentic artworks. The catch: so far, it appears Landis, who has been diagnosed as schizophrenic, has yet to commit a crime. While he’s caused headaches, confusion, and multi-year investigations, he has never sought to benefit or profit from his forgeries in any way. Instead, he enjoys the performative act of pretending to be a philanthropist who makes donations of obscure artwork to art institutions, many of which unknowingly exhibited the fakes, allowing Landis the secret thrill of seeing his work on display.

Art and Craft opens next month in a select number of theaters. (via Coudal)

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Sponsored // Win $1000 in Art from Crated

Crated is a new online art community and marketplace where you’ll find curated works of art from digital artists and photographers. Choose from poster prints, canvas prints or framed art prints, including exclusive pieces from Karim Rashid, devNgosha and Kal Barteski, or take a look at some of our favorites in this Colossal collection.

Crated is giving away a $1,000 gift certificate to spend on art plus an additional 250 runner-up prizes to Colossal readers.

To enter, just visit the contest page before Aug. 31 and click the “Enter now” button, share the contest page on Twitter or Facebook, and collect 5 or more of your favorite Crated art pieces by clicking the heart icon in the top right-hand corner of the art.Sponsored // Win $1000 in Art from Crated sponsor

Singapore Changi Airport Timelapse Turns Planes into Abstract Streaks of Light

Singapore Changi Airport Timelapse Turns Planes into Abstract Streaks of Light video art timelapse Singapore airplanes

Photographer and filmmaker Milton Tan was given unprecedented access to Singapore Changi Airport in order to film his latest timelapse of planes taking off and landing at night. In an unusual reversal, airport officials saw one of Tan’s earlier films, and immediately invited him to shoot at Changi from several restricted areas. He was at times positioned so close that you can occasionally see his tripod shake from the thrust of the jet engines.

My favorite aspect is that even when the airport appears to be busiest (Changi Airport has a takeoff or landing every minute), the airplanes only appear as abstract orbs and streaks of light moving through the sky. You can see a bit more about how it was made over on PetaPixel, and on Tan’s blog.

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