Elongated Female Figures Composed From Elements of Natural and Urban Scenery by Johanna Goodman 

Taller than trees and towering over buildings, Johanna Goodman's pieced together female forms appear to stretch far above the landscapes before them. The collaged works, which combine elements of art, design, and architecture, are a part Goodman’s series titled The Catalogue of Imaginary Beings, which aims to explore the individual’s role in history and popular culture.

“[The Catalogue of Imaginary Beings] draws its inspiration from a wide spectrum of sources—including magical realism, surrealism and symbolism—and more specifically references such cultural artifacts as talismans, idols, totems and all of the material detritus that surrounds all of us all the time,” Goodman told Ms. “These characters are composites embodying notions of ‘the warrior,’ vulnerability, industry, the universal and the personal. They reference these identities as they’ve been depicted historically through art, literature and commerce.”

Recently Goodman has created works that commemorate the strong women involved in the Women’s March on Washington and its sister marches across the globe. She has also created work inspired by the Climate March that occurred this past April (like the figure seen erupting from a smoke stack below). You can view more of Goodman’s elongated collages on her Instagram and Tumblr. (via Tu Recepcja)

See related posts on Colossal about , .

A Neural Network Generates Surprisingly Elegant Images of Dinosaurs Composed of Plants 

Artist and writer Chris Rodley utilized a deep learning algorithm to create these really lovely illustrations of dinosaurs composed of plants. The images were generated with an online service called DeepArt that lets you upload a “target” image and then apply a visual style to it. For step one he fed the network images of common dinosaurs and then applied the styles of 19th-century fruit engravings and botanical illustrations. The results are a sort of 21st-century artificial intelligence channeling Giuseppe Arcimboldo. You can read a bunch more about all the technical mumbo jumbo over on Sploid. (via Kottke)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

Colossal x Maja Wronska: Modern City Watercolor Series 

Poland-based watercolor artist and architect Maja Wronska has wowed us before with her vibrant depictions of urban landscapes. Whereas most of her previous work highlighted architectural features from centuries past, recently the artist has found new focus and energy in the dense environments of more contemporary cityscapes. Hundreds of windows hover above gridded streets and prism-shaped buildings rise above bridges and freeways, while water and earth offer a subtle topographic frame. Wrońska’s confident, consistent hand and imaginative use of color capture the organic energy that makes cities come alive.

Colossal has partnered with Maja Wrońska to create three archival prints from her Modern City Series: Tokyo, Chicago, and Frankfurt. Working with the experts at ioLabs in Rhode Island, we’ve matched the artist’s original color and paper for a print that looks like it’s fresh off Wrońska’s easel. Each city is available in two sizes; all include a two inch border for convenient framing, and are printed with Moab Entrada Natural Textured 100% rag 300 gsm archival paper. Available only in The Colossal Shop.

Three-Dimensional Hoop Embroidery Accented With Clay by Justyna Wołodkiewicz 

Artist Justyna Wołodkiewicz mixes embroidery with abstract clay forms in order to produce three-dimensional works that spring from traditional hoops. The pieces weave together bold threads with equally bright polymer clay shapes, creating multi-textured surfaces from the diverse materials.

The artist typically starts with a miniature sketch before embarking on molding the clay structures she wishes to include in each piece, stitching the final clay works into the surface of the embroidered hoop. Wołodkiewicz sells her works on her Etsy shop “Nibyniebo” which means “just like the sky.” You can see more of her sculptural embroidery on her Instagram and Facebook. (via Colossal Submissions)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

A Large Suspended Tree Trunk Carved Down to a Frayed Rope by Maskull Lasserre 

Schrodinger’s Wood. Ash tree trunk, chain hoist, gantry. 156 x 16 x 15 inches

If you had to summarize an all-encompassing theme to describe Maskull Lasserre’s artistic practice, the word would probably be tension. From the balance of life and death to the opposing forces of war and peace, the Candian artist explores tension not only metaphorically but physically as well. Case in point, his latest piece titled Schrodinger’s Wood carved from the trunk of an Ash tree that relies on the tree’s inner core to serve as a tangled mass of rope in the process of fraying from the weight of itself. The work appears to share a kindred spirit to his sliced piano artwork, Improbable Worlds. You can see more views on his website.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Rock Sculptures Suspended Within Bell Jars by Their Own Weight by Dan Grayber 

Cavity Mechanism #12 w/ Glass Dome. 2013. Mixed. 23″ x 13″ x 13″. All images via Dan Grayber.

Dan Grayber‘s works exist at the intersection of sculpture and physics, pieces carefully designed to solve the problems created by their own existence. The sculptures each include a rock suspended within a glass enclosure, the rock’s weight perfectly balanced by the mechanisms, systems, and pulleys that surround it.

Grayber relates this play of tension and balance to personal relationships, which serves as another influence to his work outside of visual interests in industrial design, construction machinery, and the children’s game Cat’s Cradle.

Cavity Mechanism #6, from 2009, [seen below] is one of the most obvious pieces to speak about interpersonal relationships that I’ve made,” said Grayber to Venison Magazine. “There are two identical mechanisms inside of a glass display dome, and one small cable that runs between the two mechanisms. This cable holds all of the tension between the two mechanisms, and they both need to remain in place to maintain the tension. I was really thinking about co-dependence when I made the piece. If either mechanism were to slip, or the connection between them to break, it would cause both to fail.”

You can see more of Grayber’s experiments in equilibrium on his Instagram and Facebook. (via Boing Boing and Makezine)

Cavity Mechanism #21. 2016. Mixed. 13" x 14" x 14".

Cavity Mechanism #21. 2016. Mixed. 13″ x 14″ x 14″

Cavity Mechanism #24. 2016. Mixed. 13.5" x 6.5" x 6.5".

Cavity Mechanism #24. 2016. Mixed. 13.5″ x 6.5″ x 6.5″

Cavity Mechanism #18. 2015. Mixed. 11" x 5" x 5"

Cavity Mechanism #18. 2015. Mixed. 11″ x 5″ x 5″

Cavity Mechanism #23. 2016. Mixed. 7.5" x 5" x 5"

Cavity Mechanism #23. 2016. Mixed. 7.5″ x 5″ x 5″

Display Case Mechanism #6. 2016. Mixed. 24.5" x 16" x 11"

Display Case Mechanism #6. 2016. Mixed. 24.5″ x 16″ x 11″

Display Case Mechanism #6. 2016. Mixed. 24.5" x 16" x 11"

Display Case Mechanism #6. 2016. Mixed. 24.5″ x 16″ x 11″

Cavity Mechanism #20. 2016. Mixed. 29.5" x 12" x 12".

Cavity Mechanism #20. 2016. Mixed. 29.5″ x 12″ x 12″

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Page 10 of 836«...9101112...»