Honey on Tap: A New Beehive that Automatically Extracts Honey without Disturbing Bees

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The Flow Hive is a new beehive invention that promises to eliminate the more laborious aspects of collecting honey from a beehive with a novel spigot system that taps into specially designed honeycomb frames. Invented over the last decade by father and son beekeepers Stuart and Cedar Anderson, the system eliminates the traditional process of honey extraction where frames are removed from beehives, opened with hot knives, and loaded into a machine that uses centrifugal force to get the honey out. Here is how the Andersons explain their design:

The Flow frame consists of already partly formed honeycomb cells. The bees complete the comb with their wax, fill the cells with honey and cap the cells as usual. When you turn the tool, a bit like a tap, the cells split vertically inside the comb forming channels allowing the honey to flow down to a sealed trough at the base of the frame and out of the hive while the bees are practically undisturbed on the comb surface.

When the honey has finished draining you turn the tap again in the upper slot resets the comb into the original position and allows the bees to chew the wax capping away, and fill it with honey again.

It’s difficult to say how this might scale up for commercial operations, but for urban or backyard beekeeping it seems like a whole lot of fun. It wouldn’t be hard to imagine these on the roof of a restaurant where honey could be extracted daily, or for use by kids or others who might be more squeamish around live bees. You can see more on their website and over on Facebook.

Update: The Flow Hive is currently seeking funding on IndieGogo. So far they’ve raised $1.8 million in 16 hours.

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Hand-painted Ceramic Plate Installations by Molly Hatch

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Quand on Aime Tout est Plaisir: After Fragonard, USA, 2013

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Quand on Aime Tout est Plaisir: After Fragonard, USA, 2013

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Recite, USA, 2014. 199 hand-thrown porcelain porcelain plates with glaze and underglaze, acrylic paint, hardware.

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Recite, detail.

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Covet Project, 2012.

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Covet Project, 2012.

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Deconstructed Lace: After Royal Copenhagen, USA, 2014. 93 hand-thrown and hand-painted porcelain plates with glaze and underglaze.

Massachusetts-based artist Molly Hatch creates immense installations of hand-built ceramic plates painted with a variety of patterns and scenes. Hatch frequently re-contextualizes historic images used centuries ago by old porcelain manufactures as well as paintings and textiles. Her largest artwork to date, Physic Garden, was installed last year at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, a monumental installation of 475 plates depicting imagery used on Chelsea Factory plates dating back to the 1750s. Hatch is represented by Todd Merrill Studio, and you can see more work on her website. (via Design*Sponge, My Amp Goes to 11)

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New Three-Dimensional Figurative Collages Encased in Multiple Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

The Brooklyn-based artist Dustin Yellin (previously) was commissioned by the New York City Ballet to install a new series of his figurative collages. The artist refers to the sculptures as Psychogeographies because “they feel like maps of the psyche.”

Each large-scale sculpture is individually embellished with bizarre found objects—cut-up books, magazines and trash found on the street—which are then sealed within layers of glass. “Imagine if you were to make a drawing on a window,” said Yellin, explaining his process. “And then you were to take another window and glue it to that window… until you had a window sandwich. I make window sandwiches.”

The resulting forms resemble dancers striking various poses: their multi-dimensional bodies encapsulated in suspended animation. A grand total of 15 of these “window sandwiches,” each weighing in at 3,000 pounds each, were installed in the atrium of the David H. Koch Theater at Lincoln Center. The installation is on view for all performances through March 1, 2015 but there’s also free public viewing through February 22. If you can’t make it you can always follow Yellin’s activities on Instagram.

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

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Architectural Letterforms Come to Life for ‘Deepblue Networks’

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For a recent promotional campaign, German creative firm Deepblue Networks collaborated with illustrator and graphic designer Florian Schommer of Kjosk Collective to create a series of animated buildings using the letters of their logo. The 8 illustrations turn each letter of the logo into a multi-story building and imagines the staff working inside. You can see the full presentation here. Creative direction by Burkhard Müller. (via Behance)

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Sponsor // A’ Design Awards 2015—Deadline February 28

The A’ Design Award & Competition is the world’s leading international annual juried competition for design. The A’ Design Accolades are organized in a wide range of creative fields to highlight the very best designers from all countries in all disciplines. Entries to the competition are peer-reviewed and anonymously judged by an influential jury panel of experienced academics, prominent press members and established professionals.

The A’ Design Prize, given to award winners, includes PR, publicity, and marketing services, in addition to an exclusive invitation to the glamorous Gala-Night and Award Ceremony at Como Lake, Italy, where award winners are presented their exclusive trophies, hardcover yearbook of best designs, and certificates.

Submit your work at adesignaward.com/registration.

Deadline for entries to the A’ Design Award & Competition is on February 28, 2015. Results will be announced on April 15, 2015.

Strong Winds Carve Otherworldly Towers from Frozen Sand on the Shore of Lake Michigan

DSC_8956 photo by Joshua Nowicki

DSC_8963 photo by Joshua Nowicki

DSC_8983 photo by Joshua Nowicki

DSC_8988 photo by Joshua Nowicki

DSC_9056 photo by Joshua Nowicki

IMG_9048 photo by Joshua Nowicki

While exploring the shores around St. Joseph, Michigan last week, photographer Joshua Nowicki stumbled onto a bizarre phenomenon: dozens of small sand towers rising out of the beach, some over a foot tall. The strange layered sand castles are formed when blasts of wind slowly erode layers of frozen sand, much like how a river might slowly create a canyon. Nowicki returned yesterday to shoot more photos, but found that sunny skies were enough to melt them away. You can see more of his photography here. (via EarthSky)

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Lifelike Galvanized Wire Animal Sculptures by Kendra Haste

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Working only with layers of painted galvanized wire atop steel armature, UK artist Kendra Haste creates faithful reproductions of creatures large and small for both public installations and private collections around the world. A graduate of the from the Royal College of Art, Haste says she is fascinated by how such a seemingly ordinary medium, chicken wire, is capable of suggesting “the sense of movement and life, of contour and volume, the contrasts of weight and lightness, of solidity and transparency—values that I find in my natural subjects.” She continues about her work with animals:

What interests me most about studying animals is identifying the spirit and character of the individual creatures. I try to create a sense of the living, breathing subject in a static 3D form, attempting to convey the emotional essence without indulging in the sentimental or anthropomorphic.

In 2010, Historic Royal Palaces commissioned Haste to fabricate thirteen sculptures around the Tower of London that will remain on view through 2021. You can see much more in this online gallery, and as part of the Art and the Animal exhibition currently at the Ella Carothers Dunnegan Gallery of Art in Missouri. (thnx, Kat Powers!)

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