Colossal

The New Face of Colossal

November 1, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Colossal Home Page

If you noticed things are a little different around here lately, you’re right—after nearly a year of work we’re extremely excited to announce that Colossal finally has a new look! The design represents the most dramatic facelift in our 7-year history and our first true redesign in over 4 years. The design brings our underlying technology and infrastructure up to speed, making things a bit more accessible on mobile devices, improving access to our massive archive of over 5,000 articles, and introducing a few subtle new features. We have a handful of tweaks left here and there, but otherwise we’re thrilled with the result and hope you enjoy it, too.

We would like to thank the incomparable Armin Vit from UnderConsideration who helmed the entire process. Vit also published the design-oriented Quipsologies blog that coincidentally ceased publishing last month. Over the years Colossal sourced dozens of stories from Quipsologies and the web will be a bit lonelier without it.

Since our inception in 2010, Colossal has embraced the idea that our identity is intertwined with the artists, designers, and stories we publish. In years past the site reflected this through various banners and collages created by numerous artists. For this latest iteration, we collaborated with Vit to incorporate this idea through the form of a logo ‘window’. Every few months we’ll rotate images of work we enjoy and update the credits on our About page. Thanks to Hari & Deepti, Meow Wolf, Daniel Mullen, Warren Keelan, and Kilian Schönberger for helping kick things off.

A big shout out to Lui Ferreyra for our fancy new bio portraits. And lastly a hat tip to our generous web host Media Temple and their CloudTech staff who have kept things humming smoothly behind the scenes here for years.

 

 



Art Photography

Artist Yang Yongliang Imagines the Bleak Effects of Industrialization in Dense Photographic Collages

November 1, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Yang Yongliang, Endless Streams, 2017. Single Channel 4K video, 7’00”, © Yang Yongliang / Courtesy Galerie Paris-Beijing

In these stark photographic collages that seem to possess the infinite density of a fractal, artist Yang Yongliang (previously) questions unchecked industrialization, the impact of climate change, and pressing social issues in his native China. Each image seems to suggest a post-apocalyptic future where the forces of urbanization collide with the natural world, creating a drab black and white dystopia. “The artist keeps developing a critic approach to reality while searching for a spiritual source in his country’s relentless march between technological progress and annihilation,” states Galerie Paris-Beijing.

As part of this new series titled Time Immemorial, Yongliang began with a series of digital collages that were printed in negative on fine art paper. Each piece was then photographed with a traditional film camera and prints were developed by hand. Lastly, the artworks are mounted on back-lit wooden cases to fulfill the artist’s intent to preserve digital imagery on photographic film.

Time Immemorial opens at Galerie Paris-Beijing on November 4, 2017.

Sinking, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 100 x 80 cm

Flooding, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 80 x 100 cm

The Cliff, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 80 x 80 cm

The Path, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 80 x 80 cm

The Streams, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 100 x 80 cm

The Flock, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 80 x 100 cm

 

 



Art

Brittle Skeletons Crocheted from Discarded Textiles by Caitlin McCormack

October 31, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Philadelphia-based artist Caitlin McCormack (previously) continues to explore the decay and remains of once-living things in her intricate crochet work. McCormick constructs her pieces using a labor intensive process that involves stiffening discarded textile materials with enamel paint to create brittle bone-like material. She then crochets fantastical intertwined skeletons of humans, birds, snakes, devils, and two-headed bats, which are displayed with stark black backdrops, glass cases, and lathed bases that reference old-fashioned displays for scientific specimens.

Her new show, Lazarus Taxa, refers to the paleontological concept of species that disappear and reappear in the fossil record. Lazarus Taxa is currently on display at Paradigm Gallery + Studio. You can also follow her on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Chandeliers Constructed From Recycled Plastic PET Bottles by Veronika Richterová

October 30, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Czech artist Veronika Richterová (previously) uses the near indestructible nature of plastic PET bottles to her advantage. By snipping, twisting, and heating the drinking vessels, she forms long-lasting sculptures that visually mirror the qualities of glass. This similarity inspired her series of PET luminaries, a project composed of fully functioning light systems in the form of chandeliers and lamps.

The included works are decorated with tulip-shaped light bulb covers, scalloped edges, and long, twisted segments of recycled bottles that imitate electrical cords. In order to protect these heat-sensitive sculptures, Richterová installs her works with bulbs and cables that produce minimal heat.

A few of Richterová’s plastic chandeliers are currently included in the 50-artist exhibition Eden Unearthed at Sydney’s Eden Gardens through February 2018. You can see more recycled works in the form of cacti, animals, and more on the artist’s website. (via Lustik)

 

 



Design

Computer-Generated Jigsaw Puzzles Based on Geological Forms

October 30, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Massachusetts-based design studio Nervous System writes unique computer programs that aim to imitate processes found in nature. These systems produce housewares and jewelry based on organic forms, creating pieces such as algae-inspired necklaces and 3D printed leaf-shaped lamps.  The company recently designed a geode jigsaw puzzle modeled after slices of agate, a type of rock characterized by its repeated colorful bands.

Every geode puzzle designed by Nervous System is completely different. The studio’s computer simulation ensures that natural variations influence the puzzle’s shape, color, and pattern, essentially “growing” the artificial geode in a similar way to how it would be formed in nature. Puzzles are each cut from birch plywood and sold at 180 or 370 pieces. You can view and purchase dozens of other original agate designs in the studio’s online shop. (via My Modern Met)

 

 



Illustration

A Collision of Flora, Fauna, and the Cosmic in Tattoos by Pony Reinhardt

October 30, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Artist Pony Reinhardt of Portland-based Tenderfoot Studio (previously) produces wildly creative tattoos which she describes as a “cosmic cataclysm of the Ghastly Phantastic.” Images of the natural world mingle with stars and elements of sacred geometry in a style reminiscent of old etchings and woodblock prints. Reinhardt has also exhibited fine art at the Smithsonian National Gallery of Art and is a US Presidential Scholar of the Arts. You can follow her recent work on Instagram.

 

 



Art Craft

A Tree-Like Figure Composed of Natural and Technological Elements by Garret Kane

October 27, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

The newest sculpture by assemblage artist Garret Kane (previously) combines moss, tree branches, and other natural elements with technological components to create a towering 7-foot-tall sculpture. The tree-like figure is Kane’s amalgamation of two protectors from vastly different cultural backgrounds. The first is the ancient Judaic Golem made from mud and sticks, and the second inspiration is the Japanese Mecha, a large protector composed of advanced robotics.

Kane combined elements from both traditions to create the Golemecha, a creature with powers tied to nature and advanced technologies. Using materials from tree roots to 3D printed parts, he built the complex model as a figure who would protect our natural world from the new technologies that threaten its existence. You can see more of Kane’s fantastical assemblages on his website and Behance.

 

 

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