Elegant Animalistic Tattoos by Joanna Swirska 

Wrocław-based tattoo artist Joanna Swirska inks carefully considered depictions of animals tinged with psychedelic splashes of color. Her most common subject is the humble feline which seems to make an appearance in nearly half of her works which run the gamut from graceful to fantastically absurd. You can follow more of her recent work on Instagram. (thnx, Taylor!)

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An Origami Pineapple Pavilion Opens Inside Berrington Hall’s 18th-Century Garden 

images © Ivan Morison and Marsha Arnold

All images © Ivan Morison and Marsha Arnold

Situated inside the garden of the Georgian mansion at the National Trust’s historic Berrington Hall is Studio Morison's newest structure Look! Look! Look!, a pineapple-shaped pavilion with angles akin to a folded work of origami. The pavilion is dusty pink, with an open rooftop and four openings that surround the structure’s sides, and was built with the support of Trust New Art and the Arts Council England.

Heather and Ivan Morison, the two artists behind Studio Morison, spent more than a year researching the garden’s history before they arrived at the design of this sculpture as a way to bridge historical Georgian life with its present use, encouraging visitors to relax or picnic within. The pink color was pulled from a traditionally Georgian palette, hues of which are found inside the hall itself.

The shape of the pavilion is based on a piece of origami created by the two artists. With the help of structural engineers the timber work was brought to life. A metal frame sits at its core, while the outside is covered with a pink fabric that can withstand all weather conditions. In addition to designing the temporary outdoor pavilion, the artists also created several sculptural pieces of furniture that exist inside, small geometric stools that reflect the shape of the sculpture which they are inclosed.

Look! Look! Look! is open to the public at Berrington Hall through December 2019. During its run visitors can attend a series of events and activities hosted inside the shelter. (via NOTCOT, urdesign)

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Salvador Dali Answers ‘Yes’ to Almost Every Single Question on the 1950s Game Show ‘What’s My Line?’ 

This clip of artist Salvador Dalí appearing on the game show “What’s My Line?” in 1957 is both charming and quite funny. A group of blindfolded panelists ask round after round of yes-or-no questions to help reveal the identity of the special guest. Due to the breadth of Dali’s work, and perhaps a bit of mischievousness, the surrealist painter finds himself answering “yes” to nearly every single question, much to everyone’s total confusion. With millions of views on YouTube this has probably crossed your path, but if you haven’t seen it, it really is a fun bit of TV. (via Mental Floss)

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Surreal Aerial Views of Fish Farms Captured by Bernhard Lang 

Flying in a helicopter high above the coast of Greece, German photographer Bernhard Lang captures unusual networks of circular fish farms. The strange, ovoid enclosures appear like abstract geometric designs, hardly related to the thriving ecosystems of fish that lay just below the surface. Aquaculture is seen by many as a more efficient way to safely breed larger volumes of fish instead of harvesting wild populations, but concerns about the environmental impact near farming sites have raised a lot of questions.

“Greece’s aquaculture industry is important for the country,” Lang shares with Colossal. “Especially [because of] the bad economic situation in Greece. Fish, mainly sea bass and sea bream is one of their biggest agricultural exports, next to olive oil.” That said, fish prices have fallen sharply in recent years, further threatening a burgeoning industry.

Lang is known for his aerial studies of industry, wildlife, and landscapes around the world including a recent series of harbors in the Philippines and a colorful collection of beach umbrellas in the Italian resort town of Adria. You can follow more of his recent photography on Behance and Instagram.

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Perspective: Hilariously Shortened Vehicles and Other Edited Oddities Race Around a City’s Streets 

Fernando Livschitz of Black Sheep Films (previously) edits everyday footage in order to add a touch of the bizarre to mundane scenes. In his most recent short film he imagines a world where certain vehicles have been hilariously shortened, landing tiny planes on one wheel, and racing single-car trains along a track. In addition to these edited vehicles, he removes horses and bikes from their riders, making it seems as if jockeys and bicyclists are effortlessly floating through the world. You can see more of Livschitz’s short films, many of which are Vimeo staff picks, on his website.

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