Digital Photo Collages of Dreamlike Scenes by Hüseyin Sahin 

Turkish art director and visual artist Hüseyin Şahin has an uncanny eye for combining disparate photographs into cohesive scenes, where technology, nature, and humankind collide. Sahin works with a variety of digital photographs which he then edits into collages that he shares on Instagram and Behance. (via ARCHatlas)

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Ephemeral Rugs Formed From Oklahoma’s Red Earth by Rena Detrixhe 

Oklahoma-based artist Rena Detrixhe creates installations from finely sifted dirt, ephemeral rugs that she stamps with ornate patterns. The dirt used for the works is collected by hand from her surrounding Oklahoma landscape, bringing an important context to the earth-based faux textiles.

“This rich red earth is the land of the dust bowl, the end of the Trail of Tears, land runs and pipelines, deep fault-lines and hydraulic fracturing,” said Detrixhe in her artist statement. “There is immense beauty and pride in this place and also profound sorrow. The refining and sifting of the soil and the imprinting of the pattern is a meditation on this past, a gesture of sensitivity, and the desire for understanding. It is a meticulous and solitary act.”

By using this fleeting form Detrixhe questions the permanent decisions that have been made to the region’s environment. One of her red dirt rugs is currently a part of the group exhibition Shifting Landscapes at Form & Concept in Santa Fe, New Mexico through May 20, 2017. You can view a time-lapse video of Detrixhe installing one of her rugs in the video below. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Miniature Displays of Contemporary Urban Buildings by Joshua Smith 

Working at 1:20 scale, artist Joshua Smith builds in-depth works that capture the layered existences of urban environments in cities such as Hong Kong, Sydney, and Los Angeles. His miniature buildings showcase the details and detritus left by the diverse population of each city, bringing in elements of the city’s workers, inhabitants, and street artists. These marks can be seen through heavily graffitied exteriors, and thoughtful additions like a small table on the roof of one building with takeout food from the tiny Chinese restaurant below.

Smith has been working on this series for the last two years, after stints as both a stencil artist and gallerist. Using several reference photos from a building’s actual site, he utilizes MDF, cardboard, and plastic to create the base of the work, and chooses paint and chalk pastels for the exterior’s details. Smith’s newest four-story work took him three months to complete, often working 8-16 hours a day.

The Australian artist recently exhibited his miniature buildings with Muriel Guepin Gallery at VOLTA Art Fair in New York City from March 1-5. You can see more of his work on his Instagram and Facebook. (via My Modern Met)

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A Fold Apart: A NASA Physicist Turned Origami Artist 

In 2001 NASA physicist Robert Lang quit his job to focus on his one true passion: creating original origami designs. With a deep understanding of mathematics and materials, Lang’s folding designs have been incorporated into everything from spacecraft to airbags. His works aren’t limited to functional objects, he’s also produced a wide range of original artworks that have been exhibited around the world. The Great Big Story recently sat down with Lang for this brief interview. (via Uncrate)

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Explore Japanese Art, Design, and Architecture in the Free JAPAN 99+1 Travel Guide (Sponsored) 

Nakajima Library, Akita International University

For the last six months an international group of writers, designers, and travel experts has written a guide to Japan that avoids typical tourist spots and focuses instead on exciting design-centric travel to places visitors rarely explore.

The free downloadable book, JAPAN 99+1: Traveling Through Art, Design, and Architecture, and its companion website, has been published by the Japan National Tourism Organization (JNTO) as a way to help travel agencies and planners discover entirely new ways of experiencing a country famous for temples, cherry trees, and ancient traditions of design and craft.

Many of the locales mentioned, whether inside the Tokyo metropolis or remote countryside areas and islands, have been designed by Japan’s best architects, so there’s a strong emphasis on this part of the experience. To put it all into context, Editor-in-chief Roland Hagenberg has interviewed these architects about their work, but within the frame of actual locations you can experience in person during your travels in Japan.

Although the print edition of JAPAN 99+1 is free, its global distribution is limited primarily to the travel industry. However, the same content and more can be found on the project’s website, art.japan.travel, for you to discover right now. Download your free digital copy of JAPAN 99+1, no registration required.

Miho Museum

Aqua Ignis Kataoka Onsen

Oku-Noto Triennale © Naoki Ishikawa

This post was sponsored by Japan National Tourism Organization (JNTO).

Embroidered Haute Couture Box Bugs by Noboru Hoareau 

French embroidery artist Noboru Hoareau recently stitched this fun series of creepy insects, spiders, and arthropods comprised mostly of beads. Each piece is embroidered into fabric and framed, an objects he refers to as a “embroidery haute couture box bug”. You can see much more in his Etsy shop. If you liked these, also check out the work of Humayrah Bint Altaf and Adam Pritchett. (via Lustik)

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