A Breathtaking Quilled Paper Carpet and Gospel Book Cover by Lisa Nilsson 

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Jardin, 2016. Japanese mulberry paper, gilt edged paper. 27.5″ x 34.25″ x 2.5″

Working with compact rolls of Japanese mulberry paper in a myriad of colors, artist Lisa Nilsson painstakingly creates anatomical figures and textile patterns using a centuries-old technique called quilling. In her latest artworks Jardine and Gospel, Nilsson was inspired by the patterns of an Islamic carpet and an 8th century gospel cover. The carpet piece alone was nearly 8 months in the making as she created ornate figures of flowers, stars, and other patterns to fill a 27″ by 34″ inch frame, much of which was improvised as she worked outward from the center. For Gospel she in incorporated bright gilt edged paper to mimic the actual gold used for traditional religious book covers.

You can see more views of these artworks on Nilsson’s website, and she was recently intereviewed about the new pieces on All Things Paper.

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Jardin, detail.

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Jardin, detail.

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Jardin, detail.

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Jardin, detail.

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Jardin, detail.

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Gospel, 2016. Japanese mulberry paper, gilt edged paper. 19 3/8″ x 22 3/8″ x 2 3/8″

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Gospel, detail.

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Gospel, detail.

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Gospel, detail.

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Photographic Images That Weave Moments in Time by Jason Chen 

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Detail of “K,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 22.75in x 28.75, all images via Paradigm Gallery + Studio, Philadelphia

Moving beyond traditionally static methods of portraiture, Jason Chen creates movement through the weaving of multiple images into one. Chen’s works use separate images of the same subject to explore mutation and time, offering a more fluid peek into his subject’s emotional state. When glanced at from afar the images appear quite singular, but when zoomed in the disparate details of the images stand out—multiple eyes occupying the same face like seen in Chen’s haunting G-iii.

This is a relatively new method for the Philadelphia-based photographer who had been previously focused on dry plate tintypes. Chen is the co-founder of Paradigm Gallery + Studio where he is currently included in the group exhibition “Portrait”  through June 18th. (via Hi Fructose)

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“K,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 22.75in x 28.75

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“Ian” (2016), archival pigment print, hand cut and woven, 24”h x 36”w

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“Jessica” (2016), archival pigment print, hand cut and woven, 24”h x 36” w

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Detail of “Jessica” (2016), archival pigment print, hand cut and woven, 24”h x 36” w

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“C,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 9in x 11in

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“G-iii,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 22.75in x 28.75

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Detail of “G-iii,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 22.75in x 28.75

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“G-ii,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 20.5in x 20.5in

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Edouard Martinet’s Masterfully Sculpted Animals and Insects Made from Bicycle, Car, and Motorcycle Parts 

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Robin. Bronze, one of an edition of 12 copies, 22 x 32 x 18 cm. LEGS: springs , pieces of costume jewellery; BODY: children’s tricycle fender; FEATHERS: hood ornament of a Citroen; WINGS: petrol tank plates of a 50s motorcycle Monet-Goyon, bike chain guards; TAIL: car part, motorcycle decoration; EYES: marbles; HEAD: two seed scoops, ornaments for bike lights; BEAK: autoscope part, bike ornament.

French artist Edouard Martinet assembles faithful interpretations of birds, crustaceans, insects, and other creatures with countless objects from discarded bicycles, cars, and household objects. A bicycle pump forms the abdomen of a dragonfly, windshield wipers serve as the legs of a fly, or the metal logos of a bicycle manufacturer are layered to create the dense scales of a fish. All the more incredible considering Martinet never welds or solders his pieces, but instead uses only screws or fasteners, selecting only the perfect components that “fit” each assemblage like a puzzle. From Sladmore Contemporary:

What sets Martinet’s work apart is the brilliant formal clarity of his sculptures, and their extraordinary elegance of articulation. His degree of virtuosity is unique: he does not solder or weld parts. His sculptures are screwed together. This gives his forms an extra level of visual richness – but not in a way that merely conveys the dry precision of, say, a watchmaker. There is an X-Factor here, a graceful wit, a re-imagining of the obvious in which a beautifully finished object glows not with perfection, but with character, with new life.

Martinet will open a new exhibition of work at Sladmore Contemporary in London starting May 5th, 2016.

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Dragonfly, 115 x 54 x 80 cm. ABDOMEN: bicycle pump; THORAX: four bike rear lights, two small car lights, big upholstery tacks , gas cap, ball furniture casters; HEAD: two old bike headlights, inside round sunglasses, shoe tree parts, parts of a daisy wheel for typewriter (hair from the mouth), under the head parts of acetylene bike lights; LEGS: tubes, bike cable guide, wing nuts, cream chargers; WINGS: umbrella ribs, fencing wire, aluminium metal mesh.

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Dragonfly, detail.

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Fly, 47 x 40 x 27 cm. LEGS : windshield wiper arms, bike brakes, bike chains, small typewriter parts; HEAD: motor vehicle rear light; PROBOSCIS: car hood hinge; ANTENNAE: ski boot fasteners; THORAX: motorbike headlight; On the top : 50’s kitchen utensil. WINGS: the glass is set in a windscreen brush holder, the wing ribs are made with soldering wire; ABDOMEN: motorbike headlight, part of ceiling lamp.

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Fly, detail.

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Toad

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Sardine, 25 x 70 x 11 cm. BODY: Moped chain guard covered with multiple bicycle logo badges; HEAD: Solex front fenders, car bumpers. EYES: Flashlights; GILLS: Car door parts, bicycle chain guards. TAIL: Motorbike exhaust pipe; FINS: Cake tins.

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Sardine, detail.

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Black Swift, 45 x 20 x 17 cm. LEGS: springs, pieces of costume jewellery; BODY: silver sauce jug; WINGS and FEATHERS: petrol tank plates of a 50s Villier motorcycle, bike chain guards, scooter decoration; TAIL: car decoration; EYES: metal balls; HEAD: one seed scoop, bike headlight; BEAK: dental forceps.

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Black Swift, detail.

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Praying Mantis, 104 x 50 x 74 cm. ABDOMEN: bike fender, car ventilator and ski boots fasteners; WINGS: rear lights of a Peugeot 404; HEAD: two moped indicators; TOP FORELEGS: car mirror handles, ham slicers, nutcracker handles, spaghetti tongs; FOR ALL THE LEGS: the ends are parts from bike brakes plus a bit of bike chain; THE OTHER LEGS: windshield wiper arms, aluminium tubes; THORAX: car bumper, car mirror handles.

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A Repurposed Boeing 737 Engine Cowling Makes a Fantastic… Chair 

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If you’re looking to remodel your home or office with ultimate conversation starting furniture, look no further than the 737 Cowling Chair by Fallen Furniture. The behemoth chair is made from a genuine Boeing 737 engine cowling that sits atop a spun aluminum base in the same orientation you would find on an airplane and measures nearly 6.5′ square. It’s hard not to compare the curvy space age design to something Eero Saarinen might have designed. The Bath-based furniture company specializes in making functional objects from “reclaimed, authentic aircraft parts, from both military and civilian aircraft,” and you can see more of their designs on their website and on Facebook. (via Bored Panda)

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Sponsor // Create a Stunning Website or Portfolio with Squarespace 

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Check out these websites powered by Squarespace of artists whose work was recently featured on Colossal: Jeremy Mann, Erik Johansson, Jess Riva Cooper, and Allison May Kiphuth.

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Start a free 14-day trial at Squarespace.com (no credit card required). Use the code THISISCOLOSSAL for 10% off your first purchase.

New Architectural Watercolors by Maja Wronska 

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We’ve long enjoyed the work of painter and architect Maja Wronska (previously) who depicts unique vantages of architectural sites through detailed watercolors. Not only does Wrońska capture these buildings in their entirety, but also focuses on the specific details of their construction and environment such as chandeliers that hang within an ancient church, or the pigeons found circling its exterior. These elements are all produced with an eye for how to capture the character of a space rather than just its aesthetic, imbuing her paintings with the rich history found within each location.

Many of her pieces are available as prints and other objects on Society6. You can see more of Wronska’s works and pieces in progress on her Instagram.

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