New Designs Printed Directly From Urban Utility Covers by Berlin-Based Pirate Printers 

Berlin-based art collective Raubdruckerin (which translates to pirate printer) (previously) uses elements of urban design to create guerilla printing presses, adding ink to manhole covers, grates, and street tiles to create utilitarian designs on t-shirts and bags. The experimental print makers view the works as footprints of a particular city, with current designs collected from Amsterdam, Athens, Paris, Lisbon, and their hometown of Berlin.

By printing each of the works outside, members of Raubdruckerin are immersed in the population of each city they print, imparting spectacle on aspects of a city’s design that are often overlooked. Other motivations of the project include a desire to stimulate a new perception to their audience’s surroundings, redefine everyday routines, and encourage printed sustainability. The group is incredibly considerate of the source of all materials that go into production, making sure to choose the right manufacturers for each certified organic cotton wearable and eco friendly ink.

The collective is currently on a tour through Europe through early May. You can follow their printing stops on their Facebook and Instagram, and see more urban printed designs on their online shop.

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Comical Ceramic Figures Produced With Ancient Materials by Luciano Polverigiani 

South American artist Luciano Polverigiani creates ceramic objects that lay at the intersection of fine art sculptures and toys, figures that are designed with both a playful and thoughtfully considered eye. Each work is produced from various clays and mud, and then fired with eucalyptus wood in a gas kiln at the ideal temperature for vitrification. Although much of Polverigiani’s work is about experimentation with enamel and color glazes, the artist limits himself to materials that were readily available to ancient civilizations. You can view more of his ceramic figures on his Behance.

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Super Satisfying Video of a Woodcarver Making ‘Fibonacci’ Spiral Shavings 

In this all too brief video woodworker Paul Sellers gives us a close-up view as he creates a number of ultra satisfying ‘Fibonacci’ spiral shavings. Between the soothing music, camerawork, and the mathematical perfection of each spiral as it rises from the wood, I could watch something like this all day. Somebody call somebody and turn this into an episode of Slow TV? (via Boing Boing, The Awesomer)

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Announcing the Winners of the 2017 A’ Design Awards & Competition (Sponsor) 

Tribeca Loft Residential Apartment by Andrew Franz Architect PLLC

The A’ Design Award & Competition is the world’s largest annual juried design competition. Each year the competition accepts entries from over 110 categories, including graphic design, fashion and apparel, photography, toys and games, furniture, architecture, and visual communication.

A’ Design Prize winners receive marketing services such as press release preparation and distribution, lifetime license to use A’ Design’s award winner logo, a public relations campaign, an award trophy, an exhibition of selected projects, and a gala night invitation.

Included below is a selection of some of our favorite preliminary entry winners.

Multi functional chair by Yi-An Hung, Yestudio

Into The Water (Women In Water Series) Series of artworks by Sonia Alins

Pasta Nikita Packaging by Nikita Konkin

DuoSkin On-Skin User Interface by Cindy Hsin-Liu Kao

Binhi Multifunctional Bench by Ito Kish

To learn more about the A’ Design Award & Competition, visit whatisadesignaward.com.

To register, visit competition.adesignaward.com/registration.php.

Miniature Power Line Towers Sprout from the Bristles of Toothbrushes by Takahiro Iwasaki 

Japanese artist Takahiro Iwasaki (previously) works with the finest bristles of toothbrushes and brooms to construct architectural structures as part of his ongoing series titled Out of Disorder (Brushes of World). Inspired by the industrial history of Japan, Iwasaki builds fragile radio towers, power lines, and other buildings by gluing tiny cut piece of brush filament cut from the objects open which they rest. The artist recently exhibited with URANO Gallery at Art Stage Singapore 2017, and you can see more of his miniature works on Artsy and Ocula Magazine.

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Animals Etched onto Dirty Cars by Illustrator Nikita Golubev 

Over the last few weeks, Moscow-based artist and illustrator Nikita Golubev has taken to the streets to etch images of animals onto the sides of completely filthy vehicles. The reductive process involves creating “clean” spots by wiping or scraping his images onto the gritty surface of each car. You can see more from his “Dirty Art” series on Facebook. (via Twisted Sifter)

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