The Extraordinary Iridescent Details of Peacock Feathers Captured Under a Microscope 

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In this series of photographs featuring the delicate details of peacock feathers, photographer Waldo Nell relied on an Olympus BX 53 microscope to take hundreds of individual shots that were combined to create each image seen here. The process, called photo stacking, blends dozens or even hundreds of photos taken at different focal points and then stitches them together to extend the depth of field. At this level of detail the feathers look more like ornate jewelry, thick braids of iridescent necklaces or bracelets, rather than something that grows organically from the wings of a bird.

By day Nell is a software engineer in Port Moody, BC, Canada, but is fascinated by technology, science, and nature, all of which he merges in his photography practice. You can see more of his work on Flickr. (via Reddit)

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New in the Colossal Shop: Stacking Cats, Art + Science, and You Are Beautiful 

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If you’re looking for a quirky new object for your space or a gift guaranteed to make someone smile, we’ve recently started carrying lots of new things in the Colossal Shop! New items include the super fun stacking cats you’ve probably seen around the web, a new pair of gravity-defying bookshelves from Artori Design, Art / Science / Wonder prints and pins from Imaginary Foundation, and a pair of birch plywood You Are Beautiful signs from Chicago artist Matthew Hoffman. More new stuff in the shop.

New Walls and Canvases by Pichi & Avo That Mix Classic Greek Imagery With Graffiti Writing 

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Mural in Boras, image via Pichi & Avo

Although Pichi & Avo (previously here and here) have continued to focus on their signature style of classic Greek gods and mythology intermixed graffiti writing, their works have now migrated off the wall and onto the canvas. The duo still produces stories-high murals, like the two they contributed to the Puerto Street Art Festival in late 2015, but have also began to incorporate their work into a gallery setting. This past December they presented two acrylic and aerosol canvases at SCOPE art fair with C.A.V.E. Gallery, each appearing like a cross-section of one of their larger wall murals.

The two are also in a group exhibition titled “Rough Cast” currently at Colab Gallery in Germany through May 7, 2016. You can see more of Pichi & Avo’s murals from across the world on their Instagram. (via StreetArtNews)

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Mural in Valencia, image via Pichi & Avo

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Mural in Valencia, image via Pichi & Avo

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“Bacchus Education,″ acrylic and aerosol on canvas, 57” x 45” (146 x 114 cm). Courtesy C.A.V.E. Gallery.

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Courtesy Colab Gallery.

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“Urban Warrior” at the Puerto Street Art Festival in Puerto de la Cruz, image via Pichi & Avo

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Close up of “Urban Warrior” at the Puerto Street Art Festival in Puerto de la Cruz, image via Pichi & Avo

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Mural in Fondi-Italy, image by Arianna Barone

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Dramatic Aerial Landscape Photos of Our Impact on Nature Captured by Daniel Beltrá 

February 8th 2007. Southern Ocean.

February 8th 2007, Southern Ocean, all images © Daniel Beltrá

During his past two decades as a photographer, Daniel Beltrá has photographed landscapes in all seven continents, exploring equally the beauty and tragedy found in nature across the globe. Beltrá works mostly in the air, providing the viewer with the expansive scale of what he encounters while perched inside an airplane or helicopter such as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill which he captured over the span of two months.

Other locations the Spanish photographer has traveled to included the Brazilian Amazon, the Arctic, the Southern Oceans, and the Patagonian ice fields. Beltrá was drawn to each of these locations due to the complexity of nature found at each. He explains in his artist statement that the “fragility of our ecosystems is a continuous thread throughout my work. My photographs show the vast scale of transformation our world is under from human-made stresses.”

Beltrá hopes that his unique aerial perspective and subject matter instill an understanding of how we are directly affecting the environment around us and at the edges of the globe. Many of his images from locations in Iceland and Greenland were recently included in his solo exhibition “Ice/Green Lands” at Catherine Edelman Gallery in Chicago that closed on March 5, 2016. The photographer also recently published a collection of his images from the 2010 BP oil spill in his book SPILL. You can see more of his expansive landscape photography on his Instagram and Facebook. (via Ignant)

August 19th, 2014. Ilulissat, Greenland

August 19th, 2014, Ilulissat, Greenland

August 24th, 2014. Ilulissat, Greenland

August 24th, 2014, Ilulissat, Greenland

July 7th 2014, Iceland aerials

July 7th 2014, Iceland aerials

Water in Iceland's Ölfusá River flows around sandbars towards the Atlantic Ocean, July 7th 2014. The Ölfusá is Iceland's largest river and its watershed drains 6100 square kilometers or 1/7th of Iceland, including the Langjökull glacier. According to a recent study by the University of Arizona to be published in Geophysical Research Letters, parts of Iceland are rising as much as 35mm per year; this is directly related to the melting of Iceland's glaciers and to global warming.

July 7th 2014, Iceland’s Ölfusá River

September 16, 2013. Brazil. Aerials from Manaus to Santarem. Photo by Daniel Beltra for Greenpeace

September 16, 2013, Brazil. Aerials from Manaus to Santarem

September 10th, 2012. Arctic Ocean. Greenpeace MY Arctic Sunrise ship expedition to the Arctic to document the lowest sea ice level on record. Photo by Daniel Beltra for Greenpeace

September 10th, 2012, Arctic Ocean

Para, Brazil. February 11, 2012. Aerials south of Santarem and along the road BR163. Rainforest in the Tapajós River, coordinates: -4.737923-56.448047. Photo by Daniel Beltra for Greenpeace

February 11, 2012, Para, Brazil

Louisiana (USA). May 6th, 2010. Aerial view of the oil leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead, the BP leased oil platform exploded April 20 and sank after burning. Leaking an estimate of more than 200,000 gallons of crude oil per day from the broken pipeline to the sea. Eleven workers are missing, presumed dead. Photo by Daniel Beltra/Greenpeace

May 6th, 2010, Aerial view of the oil leaked from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead

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Suspended Tree Sculptures Connect an Artist to His Cuban Roots 

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“Espiritual conexion” (2012), paper, cable, fabric, acrylics and wood, 17.7 x 39.3 x 19.6 inch, all images via Jorge Mayet

Jorge Mayet's tree sculptures produced from paper, wire, fabric, and acrylic showcase the ways in which a tree’s roots often mimic the branches that sprout above ground. In these suspended works the underground systems are far more expansive than what appears above the earth, showing the viewer that what typically appears before us is only half of the real picture. Hanging from invisible wires, Mayet works are a conceptual connection to his own memories and roots growing up in Cuba, a visual metaphor for being uprooted from his home country.

The Cuban expatriate currently lives and works in Mallorca, Spain where he focuses his practice on allegorical landscapes like the ones seen here. You can see more of Mayet’s sculptures on his Facebook. (via Cross Connect Magazine)

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“Me desprendo de ti” (2009), paper, wire, fabric and acrylic, 66.9 x 23.6 x 23.6 inch

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Close up of Me desprendo de ti (2009), paper, wire, fabric and acrylic

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“Untitled” (2009), paper, wire, fabric and acrylic, 39.3 x 19.6 x 19.6 inch

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“Ochún” (2009), wood, paper, wire, fabric and acrylic, 39.3 x 19.6 x 19.6 inch

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“Sobre natural” (2008), wire, paper maché, textil and acrylics, 62.9 x 33.8 x 33.8 inch

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“A todos mis santos” (2008), paper, wire, acrylics and yarn, 45.2 x 27.5 x 23.6 inch

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“Corazón de Fuego” (2010), paper, cable, fabric, acrylics and resin, 55.1 x 33.4 x 33.4 inch

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“Tierra nueva” (2009), paper, wire, fabric and acrylic, 39.3 x 19.6 x 19.6 inch

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“Culto dialéctico de lo sagrado” (2010), paper, feathers, beads and acrylic, 15.3 x 53.1 x 26.3 inch

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Terrarium Lamps by Nui Studio Light Your Space with Suspended Ecosystems 

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All images courtesy of Nui Studio, © ErwinBlock Photography

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Nui Studio (formerly We Love Eames) has designed a lamp fit for the dim and sun-shielded garden apartments of the world, the living and working locations that are void of the light needed to grow lush plants indoors. The project is titled the Mygdal plant lamp, and is built from mouth-blown glass and aluminum. The plants placed inside this environment thrive on a completely self-sustained ecosystem that needs neither natural light or watering, with the installed LED lights sufficient enough to aid in photosynthesis for most plants.

The name of the lamp is a tribute to the Danish hometown of glassmaker Peter Kuchinke, and translates to mean “fertile soil.” Two minimal versions of the lamps were built, one to hang from the ceiling, while the other rests on top of a flat surface.

Nui Studio was founded in 2014 by Emilia Lucht and Arne Sebrantke. The two met while studying industrial design at Muthesius Academy of Fine Art where they started dating and designing together. The creative duo is currently finishing their masters degree at Burg Giebichenstein University of Art and Design. You can explore more of their furniture design and projects on their Facebook. (via Colossal Submissions)

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