Spectacular Camera Drone Footage of New Year’s Fireworks Over Lima 

Right at midnight on New Year’s Eve, photographer Jeff Cremer sent his camera drone up into the skies above Lima, Peru to capture the sights and sounds of residents shooting off fireworks. A heck of a lot of fireworks it turns out, shot from streets and rooftops across the entire city. Cremer wanted to get a bit closer to the action but smartly kept his drone at about 200m so it wouldn’t be knocked out of the sky by a random firework. Set to Perpetuum Mobile by Penguin Cafe Orchestra. (via PetaPixel)

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New ‘8-Bit’ Watercolor Paintings Inspired by Famous Artworks and Pop Culture Icons by Adam Lister 

Bar at the Folies Bergere

Bar at the Folies Bergere

Adam Lister (previously here and here) recreates famous artworks with watercolor paintings that appear as if they have been pulled directly from a 1980s Atari. The modulated technique makes each image appear futuristic, even if the work is a reimagining of the late 19th century Georges Seurat piece A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte.

In addition to producing recreations of famous paintings in this nearly cubist style, Lister also paints portraits of famous pop icons, previous works including Popeye and Darth Vader. This September Lister had a solo exhibition at White Walls in San Francsico titled “Elucidation.” The exhibition featured many of his regular-sized works as well as a few miniature paintings that featured subjects from Monopoly boards to Damien Hirst’s famous tiger shark suspended in formaldehyde (“The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living“).

You can browse his limited edition prints and new releases on his website here.

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The Great Wave, image provided by White Walls San Francisco

The School of Athens, image provided by White Walls San Francisco

The School of Athens, image provided by White Walls San Francisco

Olympia after Manet

Olympia after Manet

Lady with an Ermine after da Vinci

Lady with an Ermine after da Vinci

La velata after Raphael

La velata after Raphael

bb8, image provided by White Walls San Francisco

bb8, image provided by White Walls San Francisco

Boba Fett and Darth Vader, image provided by White Walls San Francisco

Boba Fett and Darth Vader, image provided by White Walls San Francisco

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Hirst, image provided by White Walls San Francisco

Hirst, image provided by White Walls San Francisco

Monopoly, image provided by White Walls San Francisco

Monopoly, image provided by White Walls San Francisco

Popeye, image provided by White Walls San Francisco

Popeye, image provided by White Walls San Francisco

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Cut Rice Paper Sculptures of Twisting Rollercoasters by Bovey Lee 

Flower Knot– The Moon Cyclist

Flower Knot–The Moon Cyclist. 35.5×35.5”, 2015. Chinese xuan (rice) paper on silk, hand cut.

Early last year, artist Bovey Lee (previously) made the move from Pittsburgh to Los Angeles, experiencing the overwhelming emotions and turmoil one faces when moving across the country. As a way to reconcile the differences between the two cities, Bovey began working on a new body of cut rice paper artworks that display the features and landscapes of her old a new lives as if twisted together on the spiraling tracks of rollercoasters.

Cut by hand from Chinese xuan paper, the pieces depict collisions of skyscrapers and flower bouquets, buffalos carrying mountainous stacks of suitcases, and in a piece titled Eternity – The Rescuer tumbling wedding cakes are surrounded by storm clouds. She shares with us about the new work:

Speaking to the motivation of my relocation, the works also feature imagery associated with romantic relationships, and wedding bouquets, engagement rings, cakes, and eternity symbols populate the pieces. In these works, I draw parallels between one’s romantic relationship and our relationship with nature. While seeking balance, eternity, stability, and harmony in both relationships, the journey we take on are often complex, dramatic, changing, and lopsided. But there is also incredible beauty, energy, richness, and even whimsy in chaos and imperfections through the ups and downs, and trial and error.

Many of these pieces will be on view starting next week at Gavlak Gallery for her show titled Divertical (a name taken from the world’s tallest water rollercoaster) starting January 9th. What you see here is just a fraction of her latest art, see plenty more in her 2015 gallery.

The Tightrope Walker

The Tightrope Walker 50×27.5”, 2015. Chinese xuan (rice) paper on silk, hand cut.

The Tightrope Walker, detail

The Tightrope Walker, detail

The Tightrope Walker, detail

The Tightrope Walker, detail

The Skateboarder

The Skateboarder 32×19”, 2015. Chinese xuan (rice) paper on silk, hand cut.

The Skateboarder, detail

The Skateboarder, detail

The Ribbon Dancer

The Ribbon Dancer 28.5×17.5”, 2015. Chinese xuan (rice) paper on silk, hand cut.

The Ribbon Dancer, detail

The Ribbon Dancer, detail

Eternity–The Rescuer

Eternity–The Rescuer 26×14.5”, 2015. Chinese xuan (rice) paper on silk, hand cut.

Ring–The Big Wave Surfer

Ring–The Big Wave Surfer 12×12”, 2015. Chinese xuan (rice) paper on silk, hand cut.

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A Photographic Celebration of America’s Vibrant Textile Industry by Christopher Payne 

S&D Spinning Mill, Millbury, Massachusetts

S&D Spinning Mill, Millbury, Massachusetts

Typically focusing on obsolete or decrepit architectural structures, photographer Chris Payne's most recent project, Textiles, documents the aesthetics of the colorfully-hued American textile industry. His photographs showcase the bright runs of yarn and thread as the materials makes their way through the hyper-organized machinery, appearing digitally altered in their extreme hot pinks, vibrant reds, and electric blues.

Payne began photographing the factories and mills in America’s Northeast in 2010. The images are not just snapshots of the industry, but photographs that sometimes took months to catch. Due to the machinery’s continuous run and his inability to halt production, Payne had to wait until the perfect moment when the right color would appear, or the parts of the machinery would perfectly align. Payne also features the workers within his documentation of the diminishing domestic industry, explaining that their inclusion is proof that labor and craftsmanship is still valued in our current economy.

“Over the past five years, I have gained access to an industry that continues to thrive, albeit on a much smaller scale, and for the most part, out of public view,” said Payne. “Many mills are doing quite well, having modernized to stay competitive, while others have survived by catering to niche markets that value the ‘genuine article’ produced on the original, vintage equipment. I view my work as a celebration of American manufacturing—not a eulogy.

Trained as an architect, Payne typically shoots architectural structures using large format documentation to capture America’s industrial landscape. Past projects have included exploring America’s asylums and an uninhabited island named North Brother Island in New York City’s East River. Payne’s Asylum series will appear at Benrubi Gallery February 11, 2016 and run through March 26, 2016. (via Huffington Post)

Bartlettyarns, Harmony, Maine

Bartlettyarns, Harmony, Maine

S&D Spinning Mill, Millbury, Massachusetts

S&D Spinning Mill, Millbury, Massachusetts

Fall River Knitting Mills, Fall River, Massachusetts

Fall River Knitting Mills, Fall River, Massachusetts

Polartec, Lawrence, Massachusetts

Polartec, Lawrence, Massachusetts

Polartec, Lawrence, Massachusetts

Polartec, Lawrence, Massachusetts

Langhorne Carpet, Penndel, Pennsylvania

Langhorne Carpet, Penndel, Pennsylvania

Conrad-Jarvis, Pawtucket, Rhode Island

Conrad-Jarvis, Pawtucket, Rhode Island

 

Bloomsburg Carpet, Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania

Bloomsburg Carpet, Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania

Darn Tough Socks, Cabot Hosiery Mills, Northfield, Vermont

Darn Tough Socks, Cabot Hosiery Mills, Northfield, Vermont

S&D Spinning Mill, Millbury, Massachusetts

S&D Spinning Mill, Millbury, Massachusetts

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The Soft, Memory-Laden Oil Paintings of Joshua Flint 

Migration | oil on wood panel | 30" x 30"

Migration | oil on wood panel | 30″ x 30″

The oil paintings of Joshua Flint look like depictions of memories when one tries too hard to access the faded thoughts—worn corners, blurred faces, and transposed scenes that don’t quite make sense. Each work has a familiar element that seems to be cast in a dark and foreboding haze like Sandcastles, a dark painting that disguises whether the included children are building or destroying the miniature city that lies before them.

“There is a dynamic interplay between experience and interpretation,” says Flint about his work. “What is remembered isn’t necessarily descriptive of the actual event. Once the experience has passed through our emotional filter we assign meaning to it, changing the actualities. My paintings explore that place in-between a direct translation and the abstract of emotion.”

Flint has a current exhibition titled “The World Between” at Sumter County Gallery of Art in Sumter, South Carolina which continues until January 8, 2016. You can see more of his oil paintings and in-process sketches on his Instagram here. (via Booooooom)

Memory Palace | oil on wood panel | 24" x 24"

Memory Palace | oil on wood panel | 24″ x 24″

The Banquet | oil on canvas | 48" x 60"

The Banquet | oil on canvas | 48″ x 60″

They Feed the Earth | Oil on Canvas | 48" x 48"

They Feed the Earth | Oil on Canvas | 48″ x 48″

Mapping a Galaxy | oil on wood panel | 30" x 30"

Mapping a Galaxy | oil on wood panel | 30″ x 30″

Bright Reflections | Oil on Wood | 24" x 24"

Bright Reflections | Oil on Wood | 24″ x 24″

The Wide Arena of Air | oil on wood panel | 36" x 36"

The Wide Arena of Air | oil on wood panel | 36″ x 36″

Sandcastles | oil on canvas | 48" x 48"

Sandcastles | oil on canvas | 48″ x 48″

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Sponsor // Develop Your Creative Side at The 92Y Art Center 

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The 92Y Art Center in NYC is comprised of three world-class programs: Fine Art & Design, the Ceramics Center, and the Jewelry Center, which is the largest of its kind in the nation. The Art Center is where artists of every age and skill level discover their inspiration, fuel their imaginations, and chart their personal paths as creators. Classes start soon and run throughout the spring. Register now to receive 20% off with code Col20.

On January 12 from 69pm, take part in Transformation Tuesday, an evening in the Art Center and 92Y’s May Center featuring free workshops, demos, and open studios in the arts, health, fitness, and sports. All attendees will have an opportunity to meet with program directors, faculty, and existing students. Come early and stay late—to mix and mingle with fellow New Yorkers, and to help ring in 2016. Learn more at 92Y.org.

Cut Travertine Marble and Resin Merge to Create ‘Lagoon’ Tables 

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Designer Alexandre Chapelin of LA Table designed this intriguing series of three tables he refers to as Lagoon Tables. Each table is formed from a carved travertine base to which he adheres a special resin that forms volumes of water that appear to slice through each piece. The tables are undoubtedly influenced by Chapelin’s immediate surroundings on the small Caribbean island of Saint Martin where his studio is based. You can see more of his work here. (via Colossal Submissions)

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