Head Over Heels: An Oscar-Nominated Stop-Motion Short About the Struggles of an Upside Down Relationship

It’s not often that a student film gets nominated for an Oscar, but such was the case with Head Over Heels, the graduate film of animator Timothy Reckart that went on to pickup awards and nominations around the world when it was released two years ago. The film tells the story of a crumbling relationship depicted by the visual metaphor of a couple who are pulled by gravity in opposite directions; one lives on the ceiling and the other on the floor. Reckart just made the film viewable online for the first time along with a number of extras including a director’s commentary. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Colorful Psychedelic Installations of Sugar and Candy by Pip & Pop

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“I saw a dream like this” at Australian Experimental Art Foundation, Adelaide 2013. Photos by Andre Castellucci and Pip & Pop

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“I saw a dream like this” at Australian Experimental Art Foundation, Adelaide 2013. Photos by Andre Castellucci and Pip & Pop

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“Through a hole in the mountain” at MT Kurashiki, Japan 2014. Photos by Keizo Kioku

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“Through a hole in the mountain” at MT Kurashiki, Japan 2014. Photos by Keizo Kioku

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“Candy Lab” at Mediamatic, Amsterdam, Netherlands 2014. Photos by Willem Velthoven and Pip & Pop

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“Candy Lab” at Mediamatic, Amsterdam, Netherlands 2014. Photos by Willem Velthoven and Pip & Pop

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“Candy Lab” at Mediamatic, Amsterdam, Netherlands 2014. Photos by Willem Velthoven and Pip & Pop

Australian artist Tanya Schultz creates immersive wonderlands using the sweetest materials: colorful sugar and candy. But along with the hundreds of pounds of sugar, the miniature worlds, which are reminiscent of mythological lands made from food, often incorporate as many ingredients as there are colors. Working under the pseudonym Pip & Pop, Schultz uses everything from glitter and pipe cleaners to beads and figurines to create her psychedelic installations, which have been exhibited all around the world.

Pip and Pop began as a duo in 2007 but since 2011 Schultz has been working alone, or sometimes collaborating with other artist or creative companies, to create her elaborate installations. Check out what she’s been up to recently and allow yourself to be transported to imaginary worlds where sugar rains from the sky and streets are paved with candies. (via Cross Connect)

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A Glass Table that Appears to be Held Aloft by Helium Balloons

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The UP Balloon Coffee Table designed by Duffy London cleverly creates the illusion of a glass tabletop supported by 11 helium balloons. You might remember Duffy’s wildly popular glass underwater topography map table from last year. The balloons and strings in the UP table are actually made from steel rods and metal resin composite, creating a sturdy base. Duffy plans to make only 25 tables and they’re available in red, gold, and silver balloons. (via Designboom, Laughing Squid)

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Murals of Animals and Insects on the Streets of Antwerp by ‘Dzia’

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Although he’s only been painting murals for less than three years, Belgian street artist Dzia has already established a distinctive style and an impressive body of work. The artist most frequently paints depictions of animals and insects in colorful patterns of lines that resemble something like a mosaic. Dzia recently collaborated with artist Gijs Vanee on a series of window pieces at Harmonie Park, and you can follow more his latest work on Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

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Collaboration with Gijs Vanhee

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Collaboration with Gijs Vanhee

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An Embroidery of Voids: A Surreal Journey through Alleyways and Narrow Spaces by Daniel Crooks

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Trying to describe this short film by artist Daniel Crooks (previously) is a bit challenging, but once you start watching you’ll get the idea. Crooks filmed narrow passages, alleys, and other nooks and crannies that he stitched together into this seemingly infinite corridor. Make sure to turn up the volume or put on some headphones, Byron Scullin‘s sound design adds an entirely different dimension. The piece was originally commissioned by Silvia and Michael Kantor for the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.

The video embedded here is courtesy Anna Schwartz Gallery, and you can watch a slightly higher resolution version on Vimeo. If you enjoyed this as much as I did, you’ll also want to watch Crooks’ A Garden of Parallel Paths. (via Booooooom)

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Photographers Create Meticulously Faithful Dioramas of Iconic Photos

Making of “The Wright Brothers” (by John Thomas Daniels, 1903)

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“The Wright Brothers” (by John Thomas Daniels, 1903)

It all started with a joke—a rather ironic challenge, if you will, to recreate the world’s most expensive photograph: Andreas Gursky’s Rhein II. Because for commercial photographers Jojakim Cortis and Adrian Sonderegger, that meant tolling away in their spare time when money wasn’t coming in to recreate a photograph that had just sold for $4.3 million. This was the beginning of Ikonen, an ambitious project to meticulously recreate iconic historical scenes in miniature. The ongoing project includes immediately recognizable shots—the Wright Brothers taking flight, the Lock Ness Monster poking its head out, “Tank Man” halting tanks during the Tiananmen Square protests—because the images have been seared into our collective memory.

“Every field has its icons, guiding stars, which reflect the spirit of time in form, media and content,” says the photographers. And when something is photographed, it has a way of transcending time rather than becoming isolated. Historical symbolism is fluid and our perception of it can change the same way history can. This, perhaps, is why Cortis and Sonderegger pull away from their miniature scene at the very end, revealing what each photograph actually is: paper, cotton balls, plastic and plenty of their own spare time. Photos shared with permission from the artists. (via Wired)

Making of “Nessie” (by Marmaduke Wetherell, 1934)

Making of “Five Soldiers Silhouette at the Battle of Broodseinde” (by Ernest Brooks, 1917)

Making of “Tiananmen” (by Stuart Franklin, 1989)

Making of “AS11-40-5878″ (by Edwin Aldrin, 1969)

“AS11-40-5878″ (by Edwin Aldrin, 1969)

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Making of “Lakehurst” (by Sam Shere, 1937)

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Making of “The last photo of the Titanic afloat” (by Francis Browne, 1912)

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“The last photo of the Titanic afloat” (by Francis Browne, 1912)

Making of “La cour du dumaine du Gras” (by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, 1826)

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“La cour du dumaine du Gras” (by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, 1826)

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Shylights: Beautiful Unfolding Kinetic Lights That Bloom like Flowers

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Several types of flowers are known to open and close for reasons of defense or energy conservation. This evolutionary mechanism, called nyctinasty, inspired Studio DRIFT to design the Shylight, a kinetic light fixture that opens dramatically during a 30 foot (9 meter) fall. The motion mimics the same action of a blooming flower or the billowing of a parachute. A collection of Shylights were just permanently installed at Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, and you can see them in action in the video above. (via Prosthetic Knowledge)

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