Category: Photography

Highlights from Apple’s Favorite Photos Shot with iPhones

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Photo by Satoshi H., courtesy Apple

For a new promotional campaign celebrating the iPhone 6 camera, Apple reached out to a multitude of amateur and professional photographers alike to assemble a collection of 57 non-commissioned images. Collected here are a dozen of my favorites, but you can see the full collection in their online gallery which also mentions the various apps photographers use to process their images. (via Kottke, PetaPixel, My Modern Met)

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Photo by Dan C., courtesy Apple

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Photo by Andrew P., courtesy Apple

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Photo by Brendan Ó., courtesy Apple

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Photo by Cielo D., courtesy Apple

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Photo by Cole R., courtesy Apple

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Photo by Eric L., courtesy Apple

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Photo by Gayle T., courtesy Apple

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Photo by John L., courtesy Apple

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Photo by Paul O., courtesy Apple

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Photo by Shan L., courtesy Apple

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Photo by Siyuan G., courtesy Apple

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Giant Freezing Waves Infused with Ice Slowly Roll in off the Coast of Nantucket

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Photo © Jonathan Nimerfroh

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Photo © Jonathan Nimerfroh

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Photo © Jonathan Nimerfroh

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Photo © Jonathan Nimerfroh

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Photo © Jonathan Nimerfroh

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Photo © Jonathan Nimerfroh

Earlier this week photographer Jonathan Nimerfroh was walking along the coast of Nantucket when he noticed something odd about the waves crashing on shore. The high temperature was 19°F (-7.2°C) and while the waves weren’t completely frozen, they were thick with pieces of ice, much like the consistency of a Slurpee, or an slushy, or an ICEE, or whatever. It’s amazing to see how the ice changes the form and color of the waves, making them seem almost solid. You can see a few more shots over on Stay Wild Magazine. You can follow more of Nimerfroh’s photography on Instagram. (thnx, Amber!)

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Highlights from the 2015 Sony World Photography Awards Shortlist

Cat-mothers
© Ramil Gilvanov/Rimma Gilvanova, Russia, Shortlist, Lifestyle, Professional Competition, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards

Old Shepherd
© Saeed Barikani, Iran, Shortlist, Smile, Open, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards

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Ukrainian protester plays piano on a barricade in front of the riot police line during the continuing protest in Kiev, Ukraine on October 2, 2014. © Vladyslav Musiienko / UNIAN, Ukraine, Shortlist, Current Affairs, Professional Competition, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards

On the Tundra....
© Simon Morris, United Kingdom, Shortlist, Smile, Open, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards

Pelican Feeding
© Melissa Little, Australia, Shortlist, Nature & Wildlife, Open, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards

Blue Fields
The images were shot from a light aircraft flying at between 4,000 & 5,000ft. The height was crucial in order to flatten perspective by using long focal lengths. Time of day and cloud cover were also critical, the abstract effect being heightened by complete lack of signifying shadow. © Simon Butterworth, United Kingdom, Shortlist, Landscape, Professional Competition, 2015 Sony World Photography Award

Underwater Grace
© Jonathan Yeap Chin Tiong, Singapore, Shortlist, Sport, Professional Competition, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards

BLNgold
© Alexander Klebe, Germany, Shortlist, Panormaic, Open, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards

First Sight
West Bengal, India. October 21, 2013. Blind girls Sonia, 12, and Anita Singh, 5, are born into poverty with congenital cataract blindness. They must accompany their parents everywhere as they cannot be left alone without risk. The surgery to cure this is simple and takes 15 minutes but because of the level of poverty in this family they have been unable to pursue the necessary operation. India has more than 12 million blind, the majority of which suffer from cataract blindness. Poverty is the main reason these millions of people are trapped in this condition. Donor funding has recently enabled both sisters to finally go for this operation. This essay is an attempt to tell the story of their lives before surgery, during the operation to regain their sight and after as they begin to discover light. © Brent Stirton, South Africa, Shortlist, Contemporary Issues, Professional, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards

The World Photography Organization just announced the shortlist for the 2015 Sony World Photography Awards. Creating a shortlist was no small feat. This year submissions swelled to a record 173,444 photographs from 171 countries. Shortlisted images will be on view at Somerset House in London from April 24th through May 10th, and Winners are announced April 23rd. You can see all shortlisted photos online in three categories: Professional, Open, and Youth.

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Strong Winds Carve Otherworldly Towers from Frozen Sand on the Shore of Lake Michigan

DSC_8956 photo by Joshua Nowicki

DSC_8963 photo by Joshua Nowicki

DSC_8983 photo by Joshua Nowicki

DSC_8988 photo by Joshua Nowicki

DSC_9056 photo by Joshua Nowicki

IMG_9048 photo by Joshua Nowicki

While exploring the shores around St. Joseph, Michigan last week, photographer Joshua Nowicki stumbled onto a bizarre phenomenon: dozens of small sand towers rising out of the beach, some over a foot tall. The strange layered sand castles are formed when blasts of wind slowly erode layers of frozen sand, much like how a river might slowly create a canyon. Nowicki returned yesterday to shoot more photos, but found that sunny skies were enough to melt them away. You can see more of his photography here. (via EarthSky)

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Hubble Spots a Cluster of Galaxies That Looks like a Massive Smiley Face

A smiling lens

Hot on the heels of their new and improved Pillars of Creation image, NASA just published a new photo that appears to be the largest happy face in existence. The eyes alone are two different galaxies, SDSSCGB 8842.3 and SDSSCGB 8842.4, and the smile is an optical illusion caused by something called strong gravitational lensing, a phenomenon where the gravitational pull of an object is so powerful it causes spacetime to warp, effectively distorting the light around it. You can read more about it over on Hubble’s website. (via Hubble)

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New Photographs of Crashing Ocean Waves Frozen in Time by Pierre Carreau

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Fascinated by the mysteries of the ocean his entire life, photographer Pierre Carreau (previously) documents the power and serenity of ocean waves in his now decade-long project AquaViva. After obtaining a business degree and going into IT, Carreau dramatically changed course in 2004 and moved with his family to the Caribbean island of St. Barthélemy where he now photographs waves as an artistic pursuit.

Carreau’s high-speed photos capture waves that appear frozen in time, giving them an almost sculptural appearance. “Water is amazing,” Carreau says. “Basically it has no color, but through reflection and refraction it can possess all of them, the entire spectrum of light.” More from his statement about AquaViva:

Carreau observes that the photographic images of AquaViva may sometimes be perceived as objects rather than as two-dimensional representations. The play of light off the multitude of facets and curves on the water’s surface gives the image a sculptural quality that enhances the sense of stillness and power. This simultaneous depiction of roiling movement and suspended kinetic energy parallels the dual nature of the oceans and of water itself: life-giving and yet dangerous, inviting and yet fearsome, primordial and yet ever-changing and always renewed.

Seen here is a collection of new photos from 2014 mixed with a few earlier shots we had yet to feature on Colossal, and there’s plenty more to see.

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A Waterfall in Oregon Appears to Stare Right Back at You

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Photographer Jarred Decker recently stopped by Silver Falls, Oregon where he captured this amazing view of North Falls that looks uncannily like an eyeball. The final image is actually three stitched shots Decker took from inside a cave, and he says it wasn’t his intention to create an eyeball-like photo, just a happy coincidence. He has prints available through Fine Art America. (via Colossal Submissions)

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