Category: Photography

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco surreal portraits conceptual

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco surreal portraits conceptual

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco surreal portraits conceptual

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco surreal portraits conceptual

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco surreal portraits conceptual

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco surreal portraits conceptual

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco surreal portraits conceptual

New Conceptual Fine Art Photography from Oleg Oprisco surreal portraits conceptual

Photographer Oleg Oprisco (previously) who lives and works in Kiev, continues to wow us with his vivid style of conceptual photography that places subjects in the middle of surreal and fantastic tableaus. Oprisco spends large amounts of time scouring flea markets and resale shops to collect props, costumes, and other items for each shot which he often sketches beforehand in a sketchbook, with the final shoot requiring 2-3 days of preparation. I love this bit from an interview with 500px earlier this year where he was asked to give advice to amateur/student photographers:

I strongly advise to use your time wisely. Laziness is your worst enemy. Enough looking at photographs taken by your idols. You’ve commented on enough work that you hate. It’s time to take photos. Your best photos. Let go and shoot, shoot, shoot!

All of Oprisco’s work is available as prints which you can inquire about directly. You can see more of his recent work on Flickr and Facebook. (via 500px)

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Photographer Captures Perfect Shadow of Mt. Fuji at Sunrise

Photographer Captures Perfect Shadow of Mt. Fuji at Sunrise shadows Mt. Fuji mountains Japan

While climbing Mt. Fuji in 2012, photographer Kris J B managed to capture this crystal clear shot of the mountain’s shadow at sunrise. The 12,388 ft. Fuji is notoriously shy and is often obscured by low hanging clouds or fog. This was the photographer’s 4th attempt to climb the mountain, an ascent in 2011 left him with a tantalizing, but ultimately unsatisfactory photograph of the mountain’s perfectly triangular shadow stretching out toward the horizon. In 2012 he arrived prepared and returned with this amazing shot.

After posting it online two years ago, K B’s image spread like wildfire and he quickly lost control of his rights. The photo was used widely without his permission, a story he recently shared with PetaPixel. K B now lives and works in England, and you can follow more of his photography on his website and over on Facebook. Image courtesy the photographer.

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Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs

Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs WWII war landscapes

Henning Rogge, “#45 (Bulau)” (2013), Analogue C-print, 24 x 29 1/8 inches (all photographs courtesy the artist and RH Contemporary Art)

Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs WWII war landscapes

Henning Rogge, “#41 (Rotterbach und Hacksiefen)” (2013), Analogue C-print, 18 3/16 x 22 inches

Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs WWII war landscapes

Henning Rogge, “#1 (Stolpe-Süd)” (2013), Analogue C-print, 24 x 29 1/8 inches

Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs WWII war landscapes

Henning Rogge, “#54 (Altwarmbüchener Moor)” (2013), Analogue C-print, 18 3/16 x 22 inches

Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs WWII war landscapes

Henning Rogge, “#58 (Projensdorfer Gehölz)” (2013), Analogue C-print, 18 3/16 x 22 inches

Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs WWII war landscapes

Henning Rogge, “#66 (Mascheroder Holz)” (2013), Analogue C-print, 18 3/16 x 22 inches

Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs WWII war landscapes

Henning Rogge, “#79 (Münsterbusch)” (2013), Analogue C-print, 18 3/16 x 22 inches

Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs WWII war landscapes

Henning Rogge, “#83 (Beerenbruch)” (2013), Analogue C-print, 18 3/16 x 22 inches

Although WWII ended almost 70 years ago, its legacy lives on: in photographs, memories and on our landscape. Walk through the forests of Germany and you’ll see craters or, scars, as German photographer Henning Rogge calls them, that are the aftermath of bombs being dropped from planes. Rogge has been tracking down these craters and photographing them, capturing moments, after decades have elapsed, of earth slowly healing her wounds. An unknowing hiker might easily mistake them for small ponds and nothing more, which is perhaps why these masked scars are so haunting. Rogge’s photographs are part of a group show titled The Beautiful Changes, which is on display at RH Contemporary Art in New York City through September 13, 2014. (via Hyperallergic)

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A Sea of 4.5 Million Baby Blue Eye Flowers in Japan’s Hitachi Seaside Park

A Sea of 4.5 Million Baby Blue Eye Flowers in Japans Hitachi Seaside Park Japan flowers
Azure TB

A Sea of 4.5 Million Baby Blue Eye Flowers in Japans Hitachi Seaside Park Japan flowers
Atsushi Motoyama

A Sea of 4.5 Million Baby Blue Eye Flowers in Japans Hitachi Seaside Park Japan flowers
Teerayut Hiruntaraporn

A Sea of 4.5 Million Baby Blue Eye Flowers in Japans Hitachi Seaside Park Japan flowers
Megu

A Sea of 4.5 Million Baby Blue Eye Flowers in Japans Hitachi Seaside Park Japan flowers
Ituki Kadiwara

A Sea of 4.5 Million Baby Blue Eye Flowers in Japans Hitachi Seaside Park Japan flowers
Syota Takahashi

A Sea of 4.5 Million Baby Blue Eye Flowers in Japans Hitachi Seaside Park Japan flowers
kobaken

A Sea of 4.5 Million Baby Blue Eye Flowers in Japans Hitachi Seaside Park Japan flowers
kobaken

Hitachi Seaside Park is a sprawling 470 acre park located in Hitachinaka, Ibaraki, Japan, that features vast flower gardens including millions of daffodils, 170 varieties of tulips, and an estimated 4.5 million baby blue eyes (Nemophila). The sea on blue flowers blooms once annually around April in an event referred to as the “Nemophila Harmony.”

If you plan on visiting, the park offers a great English language flower calendar to help plan your trip. You can see many more photos of the grounds here. (via Bored Panda)

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Remarkable Macro Photograph of a Hummingbird by Chris Morgan

Remarkable Macro Photograph of a Hummingbird by Chris Morgan macro birds

Remarkable Macro Photograph of a Hummingbird by Chris Morgan macro birds

Photographer Chris Morgan snapped these great macro shots of hummingbirds in 2011 at Bosque De Paz, a 3,000 acre privately-owned biological reserve in the middle of Costa Rica. The top photo is a Green-Crowned Brilliant, a bird that only grows to a length of 13cm and is not known for its ability to sit for portraits. You can see more of Morgan’s bird photos here. (via Lost at E Minor)

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X-Rayed Toys by Brendan Fitzpatrick

X Rayed Toys by Brendan Fitzpatrick x rays toys

X Rayed Toys by Brendan Fitzpatrick x rays toys

X Rayed Toys by Brendan Fitzpatrick x rays toys

X Rayed Toys by Brendan Fitzpatrick x rays toys

X Rayed Toys by Brendan Fitzpatrick x rays toys

X Rayed Toys by Brendan Fitzpatrick x rays toys

X Rayed Toys by Brendan Fitzpatrick x rays toys

Photographer Brendan Fitzpatrick whose floral x-rays we first featured back in 2012, just released three new collections of x-ray photos including toys, creatures, and a new set of flowers, as part of his Invisible Light series. The photos are created with the help of a standard x-ray machine, but are artificially colored to help distinguish different materials. Prints of almost all of the images are available through Behance.

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An Abandoned Bangkok Shopping Mall Hides a Fishy Secret

An Abandoned Bangkok Shopping Mall Hides a Fishy Secret Thailand fish Bangkok
Photo © Jesse Rockwell

An Abandoned Bangkok Shopping Mall Hides a Fishy Secret Thailand fish Bangkok
Photo © Jesse Rockwell

An Abandoned Bangkok Shopping Mall Hides a Fishy Secret Thailand fish Bangkok
Photo © Jesse Rockwell

An Abandoned Bangkok Shopping Mall Hides a Fishy Secret Thailand fish Bangkok
Photo © Jesse Rockwell

An Abandoned Bangkok Shopping Mall Hides a Fishy Secret Thailand fish Bangkok
Photo © Jesse Rockwell

An Abandoned Bangkok Shopping Mall Hides a Fishy Secret Thailand fish Bangkok
Photo © Jesse Rockwell

An Abandoned Bangkok Shopping Mall Hides a Fishy Secret Thailand fish Bangkok
Photo © Jesse Rockwell

In most post-apocalyptic films when the camera pans down the abandoned streets of New York or Tokyo, long after people have disappeared and the buildings have fallen into disrepair, we see nature again thriving. Trees and plants take hold in the sidewalks and wild animals like deer, bears, and lions stalk the ruins left behind by humans. But after descending the staircase at a vacant shopping mall in Bangkok, professional cook and photographer Jesse Rockwell discovered a wholly different take on beasts inheriting the Earth: fish. Specifically exotic koi and catfish, teeming by the thousands in a secret subterranean aquarium. Rockwell shares via his blog:

New World shopping mall, a four storey former shopping mall. Originally constructed as an eleven storey building. It was found to be in breach of old town Bangkok’s four storey limit on building heights. The top seven floors were demolished to adhere to building codes in 1997. In 1999 the mall burned due to suspected arson committed by a competitor in the area. The disaster resulted in several casualties, and the building has remained abandoned ever since. Not having a roof, the basement floor remains under several feet of water year round.

At some point in the early 2000s an unknown person began introducing a small population of exotic Koi and Catfish species. The small population of fish began to thrive and the result is now a self-sustained, and amazingly populated urban aquarium.

What an amazing discovery. It makes you wonder what else lurks in abandoned places around the world? You can see more of Rockwell’s photography over on 500px and on his website, Taste of the Road. (via James Theophane, The Verge)

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