Category: Photography

Halo Effect: Swimmers in Thailand Surrounded by Clouds of Bioluminescent Phytoplankton 

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When photographer Will Strathmann was recently in Krabi, Thailand, he decided to head out during a full moon to witness the effects of bioluminescent phytoplankton in the nearby Andaman Sea. His curiosity was rewarded by a small group of swimmers who were causing the microscopic organisms to light up by agitating the water around them. The result was this amazing shot. You can see more of Strathmann’s photography on Instagram. (via NatGeo)

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A Photo Series Featuring an Oversized Dachshund and Her Owner Exploring Brooklyn 

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Writer, photographer, illustrator, and director Mitch Boyer got the idea to Photoshop his tiny dachshund Vivian to an enormous scale after wanting to see her portrayed the same size of her mammoth personality. The idea was so entertaining he decided to turn the series of digitally manipulated images into a children’s book titled “Vivian the Dog Moves to Brooklyn” which depicts the pair’s own move to the city just a couple of years prior.

Knowing that each year over 5.5 million kids between the ages of one and nine move to a new home in the United States, Boyer decided to format the book as a tool to help children feel more comfortable during periods of relocation and transition. The 32-page book will feature Vivian as a six-foot-tall version of herself, adjusting to life in Brooklyn alongside Boyer and meeting some furry friends along the way.

The project is currently seeking funding on Kickstarter. You can follow Boyer and Vivian’s real day-to-day adventures on Instagram and Facebook. (via Designboom)

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Aerial Shots That Demonstrate The Stark Divide Between Rich and Poor 

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Papwa Sewgolum Golf Course © Johnny Miller / Millefoto

During apartheid, barriers were both constructed and modified to segregate urban spaces—roads, rivers, and large stretches of open land separating rich neighborhoods from the poor. Twenty-two years later these barriers still exist, large homes with lush lawns just a few yards away from tightly-packed communities organized with dirt roads rather than tree-lined streets. Photographer Johnny Miller wanted to capture the dramatic divide from a new perspective, and decided to shoot many areas in South Africa from several hundred feet in the air for a series titled “Unequal Scenes.”

By utilizing aerial photographs, the separation is all the more apparent, suburban sprawl nestled up against tight and overcrowded streets. Due to the camera’s position so high in the air, the details of each area becomes obscured. It is difficult to pinpoint an exact location for the photographs, allowing the viewer to relate the imagery to communities in their own part of the world that may also carry distinct inequalities.

“My desire with this project is to portray the most Unequal Scenes in South Africa as objectively as possible,” Miller explains in a statement about the project. “By providing a new perspective on an old problem, I hope to provoke a dialogue which can begin to address the issues of inequality and disenfranchisement in a constructive and peaceful way.”

Miller has an upcoming exhibition of his photographs in early August in Johannesburg that will be announced soon. You can see more of his aerial photographs that document inequality on his Facebook, Twitter, and Youtube. (This Isn’t Happiness)

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Bloubosrand Kya Sands © Johnny Miller / Millefoto

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Manenberg Phola Park © Johnny Miller / Millefoto

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Masiphumelele Lake Michelle © Johnny Miller / Millefoto

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Strand Nomzamo © Johnny Miller / Millefoto

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Strand Nomzamo © Johnny Miller / Millefoto

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Vukuzenzele Sweet Home © Johnny Miller / Millefoto

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Vusimuzi Mooifontein Cemetery © Johnny Miller / Millefoto

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Dramatic Portraits of Pet Fish Swimming with Personality 

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Ah yes, the majestic… goldfish. Photographer Visarute Angkatavanich (previously here and here) takes us up close and personal with these unusual domestic fish, from Siamese fighting fish (betta) to various breeds of goldfish, the Bangkok-based photographer casts these unusual pets in a spectacular light. Shooting in crystal clear aquariums with powerful lenses, Angkatavanich photographs each fish against black and white backgrounds creating the effect of each fish swimming in midair. The close-up portraits also have the added benefit of capturing moments of unintended personality. You can explore more of his recent photos on 500px.

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Artist Bill Domonkos Remixes Archival Footage and Photos into Surreal Animations 

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Photo by Fitz W. Guerin from The Library of Congress. Animation by Bill Domonkos.

Working with photographs, film clips, and illustrations lost to time, San Francisco-based filmmaker and stereoscopist Bill Domonkos creates darkly humorous animated GIFs. The resurrected photos merged with modern animation are almost completely nonsensical in subject matter and yet perfect in their execution, the more random the better. From his artist statement:

I experiment by combining, altering, editing and reassembling using digital technology, special effects and animation to create a new kind of experience. I am interested in the poetics of time and space—to renew and transform materials, experiences and ideas. The extraordinary thing about cinema is its ability to suggest the ineffable—it is this elusive, dreamlike quality that informs my work.

These brief animations capture the filmmakers wit and aesthetic, but he uses many of the same techniques for much longer films, many of which have been shown in galleris and festivals around the world. You can explore more of Domonkos’ work on Tumblr and on Ello.

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Archive film footage from the Internet Archive’s 35mm stock footage collection. Animation by Bill Domonkos.

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Photo: Costică Acsinte. Stock footage from Videvo. Animation by Bill Domonkos.

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Archive Film Footage from the Prelinger Archives. Animation by Bill Domonkos.

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(Image: Robert Thornton’s Temple of Flora) (Circular Wave Anim by SoylentGreen)

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Image from page 96 of Our domestic animals, their habits, intelligence and usefulness (1907). Animation by Bill Domonkos.

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Photo: c1909. Animation by Bill Domonkos.

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A Short Film Detailing the Miniature Replication of Nix + Gerber’s Post-Apocalyptic Studio 

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“Library” (2007), all images via The Drawing Room

Since 2005, artist Lori Nix and partner Kathleen Gerber have been producing dioramas that depict post-apocalyptic environments, everyday scenes that give the audience a glimpse of their world once nature has been left to take over. Nearly everything within the scenes is fabricated by the two under the name Nix+Gerber, with each scene taking approximately seven months from start to the final photograph. This means that the two take approximately two photographs a year, spending the bulk of their practice on miniature reproduction.

When deciding the last piece to produce for the body of work “The City,” Nix+Gerber decided to look inward. They choose to replicate their own studio, titled “The Living Room” (2013), which Nix explains actually looks like the end of the world, a disaster scene to fit within the dystopian series. For this particular project they had to work in an extremely meta fashion, scanning each CD that sat on their shelves and reproducing an even smaller replica of a subway train car that was sitting in their studio when they started production.

“It’s the little details that really make the scene come alive,” said Nix. “The fan in the back window, the paracords going everywhere, and the little items on the table.”

Despite the fact that most of Nix’s practice is focused on creating the props for each shoot, she still labels herself as a photographer rather than sculptor. “I’m not the type of photographer that is going to go out and find things to photograph,” said Nix. “I am going to create things to photograph.”

While crafting “The Living Room,” The Drawing Room produced a short documentary about Nix+Gerber’s practice which you can see below. You can also read more about the artists’ work on their blog, and see more of their miniature scenes on their Instagram and Facebook.

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“Living Room” (2013)

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“Church” (2009)

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“Control Room” (2010)

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“Anatomy Classroom” (2012)

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“Laundromat at Night” (2008)

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“The Subway” (2012)

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“Chinese Take-Out” (2013)

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“Museum of Art” (2010)

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“Beauty Shop” (2010)

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