Category: Photography

Bean: 1, Tourist: 0 — Anish Kapoor’s Cloud Gate Sculpture Fed-up with Chicago Weather

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This photo pretty much sums up the feelings of an entire city as nearly 6 inches of snow fell on Chicago late this weekend. Local photographer Patricia Jones happened to be shooting by Kapoor’s Cloud Gate as tourists were snapping their own photos when the sculpture suddenly attacked. Hilariously perfect timing. (via Reddit, Instagram)

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Photographer Unknowingly Captures a Bird Flying into a Solar Eclipse

eclipse

While standing in her backyard garden this morning around 9:20am in Leicestershire, UK, photographer Amy Shore snapped away at a perfectly clear view of a total solar eclipse with her Nikon D600. What she didn’t know until after the fact was that a lone bird was crossing the viewfinder at just the right moment. Via email Shore mentions that as a full-time photographer she normally shoots weddings, and the split-second decision to take this shot was a happy accident. It’s not immediately clear if there happened to be a weasel riding on the bird.

This eclipse was the first viewable over the UK in the social media age and photos, videos, and accounts like this have spread everywhere since this morning. The Guardian in particular had fantastic minute-to-minute coverage.

Update: Photographer Andrew Brooks got a similar shot in Manchester.

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Photographers Create Meticulously Faithful Dioramas of Iconic Photos

Making of “The Wright Brothers” (by John Thomas Daniels, 1903)

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“The Wright Brothers” (by John Thomas Daniels, 1903)

It all started with a joke—a rather ironic challenge, if you will, to recreate the world’s most expensive photograph: Andreas Gursky’s Rhein II. Because for commercial photographers Jojakim Cortis and Adrian Sonderegger, that meant tolling away in their spare time when money wasn’t coming in to recreate a photograph that had just sold for $4.3 million. This was the beginning of Ikonen, an ambitious project to meticulously recreate iconic historical scenes in miniature. The ongoing project includes immediately recognizable shots—the Wright Brothers taking flight, the Lock Ness Monster poking its head out, “Tank Man” halting tanks during the Tiananmen Square protests—because the images have been seared into our collective memory.

“Every field has its icons, guiding stars, which reflect the spirit of time in form, media and content,” says the photographers. And when something is photographed, it has a way of transcending time rather than becoming isolated. Historical symbolism is fluid and our perception of it can change the same way history can. This, perhaps, is why Cortis and Sonderegger pull away from their miniature scene at the very end, revealing what each photograph actually is: paper, cotton balls, plastic and plenty of their own spare time. Photos shared with permission from the artists. (via Wired)

Making of “Nessie” (by Marmaduke Wetherell, 1934)

Making of “Five Soldiers Silhouette at the Battle of Broodseinde” (by Ernest Brooks, 1917)

Making of “Tiananmen” (by Stuart Franklin, 1989)

Making of “AS11-40-5878″ (by Edwin Aldrin, 1969)

“AS11-40-5878″ (by Edwin Aldrin, 1969)

Hindenburg

Making of “Lakehurst” (by Sam Shere, 1937)

Titanic

Making of “The last photo of the Titanic afloat” (by Francis Browne, 1912)

titanic

“The last photo of the Titanic afloat” (by Francis Browne, 1912)

Making of “La cour du dumaine du Gras” (by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, 1826)

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“La cour du dumaine du Gras” (by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, 1826)

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Fictional Images of the Universe Made From Scanning Household Items and Food by Navid Baraty

wander space probe (1)

Planet – bottom of a glass containing half and half, water, food coloring. Moons – bottom of a glass containing coconut milk, water, food coloring. Stars – salt, cinnamon, baking powder, tums

wander space probe (2)

Black hole – bottom of a glass of coffee, salt, sugar, corn starch, cinnamon

wander space probe (3)

Planet – bottom of a glass containing half and half, water, food coloring. Stars – salt, cinnamon, baking powder

wander space probe (4)

Nebula – makeup, olive oil, chalk, baby powder, salt, water

wander space probe (5)

Nebula with gas streams – cat fur, garlic powder, salt, flour, cumin, turmeric

wander space probe (6)

Distant galaxy – olive oil, sesame oil, water, cumin, cinnamon, flour

wander space probe (7)

Spiral galaxy – baking soda, curry powder, chalk, salt, sugar, cinnamon

Have you ever left the lid of a scanner open to find that the background of your image was rendered black instead of white? That, essentially, was the impetus behind photographer Navid Baraty’s latest project WANDER Space Probe. Using an Epson photo scanner, Baraty carefully positions various household items, many of which are edible, on the document table.

Cooking ingredients like baking soda, sugar and cinnamon act as distant stars and nebulas while glasses containing milk, water and food coloring create the planets. Once everything is aligned properly Baraty hits the scan button. The photographer describes his project as “Cosmic explorations of an imaginary space probe.” You can follow Baraty’s fictional space probe and its adventures into depths of the unknown on Facebook and Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

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Highlights from Apple’s Favorite Photos Shot with iPhones

007_s.honma-(1)
Photo by Satoshi H., courtesy Apple

For a new promotional campaign celebrating the iPhone 6 camera, Apple reached out to a multitude of amateur and professional photographers alike to assemble a collection of 57 non-commissioned images. Collected here are a dozen of my favorites, but you can see the full collection in their online gallery which also mentions the various apps photographers use to process their images. (via Kottke, PetaPixel, My Modern Met)

025_d.carr
Photo by Dan C., courtesy Apple

004_a.pielage-(1)
Photo by Andrew P., courtesy Apple

014_b.o-se
Photo by Brendan Ó., courtesy Apple

019_c.delapaz
Photo by Cielo D., courtesy Apple

020_c.rise
Photo by Cole R., courtesy Apple

030_e.lin
Photo by Eric L., courtesy Apple

036_g.tan
Photo by Gayle T., courtesy Apple

048_j.lehmann
Photo by John L., courtesy Apple

064_p.octavious
Photo by Paul O., courtesy Apple

075_s.lu
Photo by Shan L., courtesy Apple

079_s.gao
Photo by Siyuan G., courtesy Apple

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Giant Freezing Waves Infused with Ice Slowly Roll in off the Coast of Nantucket

wave-1
Photo © Jonathan Nimerfroh

wave-1-detail
Photo © Jonathan Nimerfroh

wave-2
Photo © Jonathan Nimerfroh

wave-3
Photo © Jonathan Nimerfroh

wave-4
Photo © Jonathan Nimerfroh

wave-5
Photo © Jonathan Nimerfroh

Earlier this week photographer Jonathan Nimerfroh was walking along the coast of Nantucket when he noticed something odd about the waves crashing on shore. The high temperature was 19°F (-7.2°C) and while the waves weren’t completely frozen, they were thick with pieces of ice, much like the consistency of a Slurpee, or an slushy, or an ICEE, or whatever. It’s amazing to see how the ice changes the form and color of the waves, making them seem almost solid. You can see a few more shots over on Stay Wild Magazine. You can follow more of Nimerfroh’s photography on Instagram. (thnx, Amber!)

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Highlights from the 2015 Sony World Photography Awards Shortlist

Cat-mothers
© Ramil Gilvanov/Rimma Gilvanova, Russia, Shortlist, Lifestyle, Professional Competition, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards

Old Shepherd
© Saeed Barikani, Iran, Shortlist, Smile, Open, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards

Ukraine.Kiev. Euromaidan
Ukrainian protester plays piano on a barricade in front of the riot police line during the continuing protest in Kiev, Ukraine on October 2, 2014. © Vladyslav Musiienko / UNIAN, Ukraine, Shortlist, Current Affairs, Professional Competition, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards

On the Tundra....
© Simon Morris, United Kingdom, Shortlist, Smile, Open, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards

Pelican Feeding
© Melissa Little, Australia, Shortlist, Nature & Wildlife, Open, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards

Blue Fields
The images were shot from a light aircraft flying at between 4,000 & 5,000ft. The height was crucial in order to flatten perspective by using long focal lengths. Time of day and cloud cover were also critical, the abstract effect being heightened by complete lack of signifying shadow. © Simon Butterworth, United Kingdom, Shortlist, Landscape, Professional Competition, 2015 Sony World Photography Award

Underwater Grace
© Jonathan Yeap Chin Tiong, Singapore, Shortlist, Sport, Professional Competition, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards

BLNgold
© Alexander Klebe, Germany, Shortlist, Panormaic, Open, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards

First Sight
West Bengal, India. October 21, 2013. Blind girls Sonia, 12, and Anita Singh, 5, are born into poverty with congenital cataract blindness. They must accompany their parents everywhere as they cannot be left alone without risk. The surgery to cure this is simple and takes 15 minutes but because of the level of poverty in this family they have been unable to pursue the necessary operation. India has more than 12 million blind, the majority of which suffer from cataract blindness. Poverty is the main reason these millions of people are trapped in this condition. Donor funding has recently enabled both sisters to finally go for this operation. This essay is an attempt to tell the story of their lives before surgery, during the operation to regain their sight and after as they begin to discover light. © Brent Stirton, South Africa, Shortlist, Contemporary Issues, Professional, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards

The World Photography Organization just announced the shortlist for the 2015 Sony World Photography Awards. Creating a shortlist was no small feat. This year submissions swelled to a record 173,444 photographs from 171 countries. Shortlisted images will be on view at Somerset House in London from April 24th through May 10th, and Winners are announced April 23rd. You can see all shortlisted photos online in three categories: Professional, Open, and Youth.

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